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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: October 3, 1942 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - October 3, 1942, Mason City, Iowa                             NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME C 0 M P OCPARTMCNT OF HISTORY A3CHI UOIKCS THE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS VOL XLVIH ASSOCIATED PRESS UNITED PRESS FUIA LEASED WIRES MASON CITY IOWA SATURDAY OCTOBER 3 1942 BYRNESTODIRECT STABILIZATION Cut Into lUINNG FONT OFSTAUHCRSD MAY BE NEAR Red Reports Reflect Shade of Optimism for City for First Time By ROGER D GREENE Associated Press War Editor The 40 day old siege Stalin grad verged on the turning point Saturday as the red armies cut deeper into the vital German flank north the city seizing a powerfully fortified hilltop and again forced the nazis to retreat in bloody street fighting inside the Volga metropolis German Held headquarters acknowledged that the Rus sians were launching strong re lief attacks both north and south of the city but declared they failed after heavy fight ins if The nazi command also asserted that the German drive in the northwest suburbs everywhere achieved all objectives set for Fri day It did not specify these ob jectives Far to the north on the Lake Ladoga front around Leningrad the German high command re ported the destruction of seven encircled Russian lOOCOO the cap ture of 12370rea army prisoners said a re cent series of battles below the Jake had ended in complete suc cess But the grim struggle for Stal Jngrad continued to overshadow other developments on the long fighting front Our troops forged through clearing individual buildings of the enemy the soviet command announced referring to an in ner city zone Stubborn fighting continues K For the first time Russian field dispatches reflected at least a shade of optimism as Marshal Timoshenkos troops took the ini tiative in sector after sector Red Star declared the Germans were losing 2000 to 3000 killed daily and said the Russians were battering down hastily erected nazi fortifications and thrusting wedges into the invaders de fenses both inside and outside the city On the northern flank where the red armies have teen slash ing at a 40 mile barrier guard ing Hie main nazi siege forces the Russians reported they had slormcrt and captured a strate Ric height where the Germans had buried 130 damaged tanks as firingpoints German military quarters ad mitted late Friday that the main weight of the battle had now shifted to the north implying that they had been compelled to with draw troops from the inner city to combat the soviet countcrof North Flank Kaiser Workers Hear From Chief Cards Beat Yanks 20 to Get One Game Lead Over N Y in Series YANKEE STADIUM New York The sensational St Louis Cardinals drove in one run in the third inning and an other in the ninth to triumph over the New York Yankees Saturday afternoon and get a lead of one game in the Hawkeyes and Great Lakes in 0Q at 1st Periods End Slar said Russian shock fense WUIV1 aUUUK troops captured a series of trenches destroyed five machine sun nests and a pillbox and killed 150 nazis in the northwest zone With that task completed Red Star said the Russians then raced forward to new positions while the nazis apparently assuming that Ihc assault forces had dug in sent up dive bombers to rain cx plosue on the empty trenches for several hours As the Germans rushed to block the Russian drive from the north an elite soviet guard di vision struck against a flank ot the invasion wedge inside Slal ingrad and compelled the naiis to retreat leaving several hun dred dead and prisoners Buy War Savings Bonds and btamps from your GlobeGazette earner boy IOWA University Iowa Hawkeyes and the Great Lakes blue jackets battled to a 0 to 0 tie at the end of the first quarter here Saturday afternoon The Hawks had threatened to score when a pass from Farmer was intercepted by the Great Lakes on the 10 yard line A crowd of 10000 saw the game FIRST QUARTER Great Lakes elected to receive Krnetovic took Uknes kick on the three and returned to the 31 Great punched through to the 36 but the sailors took a five yard penalty for being off side Smith faked a pass and ran to the 37 Great Lakes took another five yard off side penalty Smith lateralled to Kmetovic who was thrown down on the 27 by Niedziela Much as punt was downed on the Iowa 32 plays failed to gain Smith took Farmers punt on his own 35 and was hit on the 49 INTERNING OF HERRIOT TOLD them back lo Ihe 37 McCullugh D J r was smeared on the 31 Muchas rOtmel President Ot kick nearly blocked went out of French DeDUtipS Put bounds on Iowas 38 CI1 Lrtpuueb FUl fumbled a bad in Forced Residence pass from center but recovered on the 39 Farmers punt was downed VICHY Hcrriof on the sailors 25 i the sailors 25 presidentof the defunct chamber Great McCutlough drove of deputies has been placed in to the 3J Sweiger ploughed through lo the 36 for a first down Sheer power brought Sweiger five more through the middle Great Lakes took a five yard backfield inmotion penalty Carey skirted vuli end to the 42 McCullouh hit advices forced deuce it announced of ficially Satur day United Press 26 right tackle for two Muchas kick bounced out of bounds on Iowas cracked the line for three Kmetovic intercepted Farmers pass on the 48 and lie fell on the Hawkeyc 44 Great picked up a yard into the line Trickey me ia knocked down McCulloughs nass Great picked up I MuIIcneaux missed anotherMc fcur yards inlo the line Smiths pass to Preston was no good Mucha punted over the goai The Hawks took over on their own 20 the third play Kmet ovic took Farmers punt on the Blue Jacket 30 and returned to Lakes Sweiger made the 37 five through the lost two yards on an end sweep Smith was spilled on the line by Uknes Farmer returned Muchas punt from the 25 to the 34 made three on an end sweep Farmer passed to Uknes on the 41 Trickey picked up a first down on the 46 Vacant made a yard and Farmer then threw over Parkers head Vacanti took Farmers pass on the Blue Jacket 37 for another first down Smith intercepted Farmers pass on the 10 and Parker hit him on the 19 Great took a lateral from Smith and picked up six Smith hit the middle for three Sweiger picked up a first down on the 34 Burkctt forced Carey out of bounds on the 38 Smith hit center for three End of first quarter Iowa 0 Great Lakes 0 SECOND PERIOD Great punched to the 47 but Great Lakes took a five yard offside penalty setting Cullough pass Hawkeyes took over en the 20 after McCulloughs kick roller over the goal Trickey rounded end for six yards Farm er was smacked down on the 17 after failing 0 spot n receiver Kmetovic took Farmers punt on his own 46 and was tackled on the 47 Great pushed to the Iowa 48 Iowas secondary stopped McCulIough on the 39 then he groke through to the 32 Sweiger made 17 for a first down on the 26 McCulIough punched to the 23 Hand stopped McCulIough on the 20 Sweiger hit the line for a first down on the H McCul Iough faked a pass and hit the line for a yard Smiths pass went untouched in end zone but Iowa was called for interference giving the sailors possession on the two Popov slid off right tackle for a touchdown Rectos conver sion was fide Great Lakes Iowa 0 the French frontier vealed that had been terned i r residence Chateau Brotel near Lyons bc HERRIOT cause of his refusal lo give a writ ten pledge not to try to leave France Ten police inspectors were assigned to watch him To the demand that he the pledge Herriot told the Vichy prefect of the Rhonedepartment You insult me You may tell your masters that I am not obliged to take any engagements I have only one thought to serve France How docs not concern you You have police and force You can use them but you cannot force me to take an engagement of any Weather Report FORECAST MASON CITY Rain Saturday aft ernoon Saturday night and early Sunday Cooler Saturday night and Sunday forenoon ASSIGNED TO BASE LONDON Col El liott Roosevelt has been assigned to an air base outside London as a unit commander and will be mak ing operational flights shortly it was disclosed Saturday The presi dents son arrived in Britain this week tA Intermittent light rains Saturday afternoon and in east and central portions Saturday night and in northeast portion Sunday forenoon cooler in west portion Saturday night and in Bombers Lash Nazi Centers Iowa Great Lakes I FINAL See story on Page 2 Saturday night cooler Saturday exccpt near Lake Superior cooler Saturday night IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics Moore who Maximum Friday Minimum Friday night At 8 a m Saturday YEAR AGO Maximum Minimum Precipitation 82 52 55 65 S3 19 Most Foods Rent Placed Under Ceiling WASHIfsGTON Price Administrator Leon Henderson Saturday clamped an emergency price ceiling over virtually all food items not previously con trolled and announced that with in a few days action would be taken to initiate rent control over every residence and dwelling unit world series FIRST INNING Cardinals Brown out Chandler to Hassett T Moore was called out on strikes Slaughter struck out Chandler threw only n pitches to retire the side and 10 ofthem were strikes No runs no hits no errors Yankees Rizzuto beat out a bunt to Kurowski Hassett hurl a finger on his left hand when a foul tip struck him He went lo the Yankee bench for treatment Hassett fouled to AS Cooper Cul lenbine was called out on strikes Rizbuto stole second and went to third when V Cooper threw wild into center field DiMaggio struck out No runs one hit one error one left SECOND INNING Cardinals Hassett was taken out because of his injured finger Priddy moved lo first base nnd Frank Crosetti took over at third Rizzuto threw out Musial W Cooper also went out Rizzulo to Priddy Hopp also sent a grounder to Rizzuto and was out at first No runs no hits no errors Yankees Gordon struck out It was the sixth time in the series he went down on strikes Keller out Hopp unassisted Dickey Priddy flicd 16 T Moore No runs one hit no er rors one left THIRD INNING Cardinals Kurowski walked and became the first Cardinal baserunner Marion dropped a bunt in front of the plate and the four umpires aflcr a confer ence ruled it a foul Chandler had beat Marion to first with his throw Marion then dropped a bunt to tiie right of the mound and beat Chandlers Ihrow for a base hit Kurowski going to scc and White sacrificed Chandler to Gordon who covered first the base runners advancing Brown grounded out Gordon to Priddy Kurowski scoring1 and Marioji Koine to third T Moore was called out on strikes One run one hii no er rors one left Yankees Chandler struck out Rizzuto lined to Kurowski It was a hard hit ball right at the Card inal third baseman Crosetti struck out No runs no hits no errors FOURTH INNING Cardinals Slaughter was out Priddy unassisted Musial singled to center It was the first ball Ihc Cardinals had driven out of the infield W Cooper popped to Gordon Musiol holding first Musial was out stealing Dickey to Rizzuto No runs one hit no errors one left Yankees Cullcnbinc fouled to Hopp DiMaggio singled to left Gordon flicd to Musinl DiMaggio holding first Keller flied lo Slaughter No runs one hit no er rors one left FIFTH INNING Cardinals Rizzuto threw out Hopp Kurowski sent a looping drive lo Rizzuto who caught it off his shoe tops Marion went out Crosetti to Priddy No runs no Jiils no errors Yankees Brown threw out Dickey His throw was high but Hopp pulled it down Priddy fouled to Hopp Chandler wns out Kurowski lo Hopp No runs no hits no errors SIXTH INNING Cardinals White grounded out Rizzuto to Priddy Gordon mo Chandler who covered first W Cooper flied to Keller No runs no hits no errors Yankees Gordon flied to Musial against the left field fence Slaughter robbed Keller of a homcrun when he made n leaping onehanded catch of his drive against the right field wall Ma rion threw out Dickey No runs no hits no errors SHOULD HAVE NO TROUBLE MAKING TUH WASHINGTON New York Yankees and the St Louis Cardinals should have no trouble getting back to St Louis the fortunes of baseball world scries beyond regularly schctl exlend the five games ulcd trains the office of defense transportation said Saturday The only restriction imposed on Die ball clubs by ODTs recent time table freezing order is the ban against chartering entire tars for the teams EIGHTH INNING Cardinals The crowd Musial and Slaughter a hand as they came into the bench gave at puruon oEuuraay night and in extreme cast portion Sunday mcntaHy fumbled Browns forenoon grounder but recovered it in time to tnrow outT Moore flied nim oui T Moore filed MINNESOTA Showers Saturday to DiMaggio No runs no hits no and extrame cast portion early errors Yankees Rizzuto after working the count to three and two fouled to W Cooper Crosetti was out Brown to Hopp Cullenbine singled to center DiMaggio flied to in deep left field No runs one nil no errors one left SEVENTH INNING Cardinals Crosetti went against the box seats along the Yankee dugout lo take Slaughters foul FINAL Musial went out Priddy to Hoppout Gordonto Priddy Kurowski singled to left Marion forced Kuroowski Rizzuto to Gordon White fouled to Dickey No runs one hit no errors one left Yankees Priddy popped to Brown Ruffing batted for Chand ler Ruffine struck out Rizzuto singled to left Crosetti out Ku rowski to Hopp No runs one hit no errors one left NINTH INNING Cardinals Marvin Broiler a righthander came in to pitch for New York Brown singled to right center T Aloorc bunted and Breuer made a poor throw to Kiz zuto for an error in attempting to head off Brown at second and both runners were safe no Half a dozen of the Yankees fol lowed Umpire Maccrkurth out into centalfield to protest the decision at great length but finally re turned to their positions and the gamr resumed Slaughter rapped a sharp sin gle to center scoring Brown and T Alonre slid under Di Mngsios throw at third as Slaughter took second It was a close play at third base and all the Yankees including Man axcr McCarthy rushed up lo Umpire Summers anil arjrucd against it violently n the country By the move coming within two hours after the presidential antiinflation directives Hender son increased from about UO per cent to a full 90 per cent the gov ernments control over the food budget of the average family and acted to extend rent ceilings over new areas embracing about 80 000000 people The emergency food ceiling ef fective Monday will last for 60 days and will cover retailers wholesalers and processors li freezes at the highest level ot the past five as through October indivi dual dealers prices on those food items Butter cheese eggs poultry flour dry onions potatoes fresh and canned citrus fruits and juices dry edible beans evapor ated and condensed milk corn meil nnd mutton As the score stands the only important foodstuffs still exempt from price control are fresli fruits and vegetables except potatoes dry onions and citrus fresh fish and of a seasonal nature and expected shortly to be brought under special price orders By the time the 60day freeze expires the office of price ad ministration expects to issue permanent price ceilings which in many if not all cases will ac tually reduce the prices of the grocery store items covered Prices of some uncontrolled foods have been running wild the price administrator noted We have now curbed shall therefore look into the mat ter of setting some of them back to a more normal relationship with the rest of the food field Sales by farmers lo packers processors or wholesalers arc not affected by the emergency ref lations but if a farmers direct sales to consumers arc more than S7S in the preceding calendar month then the regulations appJ3 GO OTSTRfE AT MINNESOTA U Attendants Evacuate Patients From Hospital on University Grounds MINNEAPOLIS Minn Building service employes went on strike against the University of Minnesota Saturday and at tendants began evacuating pa tients from the University hos pital The strike was called by Ihe Public Building Service union AFL which established a picket line around the university campus including the stadium SWEEPNG F R ORDER GIVENON PRICES WAGES Byrnes Resigns From Supreme Court to Take Over New Position WASHINGTON AP President Roosevelt Saturday named Associate Justice James F Byrnes of the su preme court director of eco nomic stabilization w i 1 li broad policy making powers to control the nations cost oE living At the same time he accepted Byrnes resignation from the court The president issued a sweeping order directing the national war labor hoard to limit wages and salaries Price Administra tor Leon Henderson to put ceilings on rents and prices and Secretary of Agricul ture Wickard and Hender sonto limit farm prices at levels as of Sept 15 as far as practicable The order issued soon aft er the president signed the antiinflation bill K r i d a y night created an office of mciuinng me suiauu J he oilier umpires Iiitl to order where Minnesota plays the the Yanks back to their positions naval cndets Saturday Ray Amberg hospital supcrm tendcnt said not enough buildin in the removal of Breuei from the mound Jim Turner marched in from the bullpen to pitch for New York Musial was walked intentionally to load the bases DiMasgio made a running catch of W Coopers short fly back of second base Hopp nice to Keller in short left and T Moore was out trying to score after the catch Keller to Dickey One run two hits one er ror two left Yankees Cullcnbinc flicd to T Moore who made a nice running even after this Coach Fletcher came out to the plate for UL LulBU UUIum a conference with Dickey This service employes remained on ihc 1 r JQb to maintain health aiC comfort of the 375 patients He said about 100 of those able to be moved would be taken to their homes by ambulances if necessary We have only five persons working in ihc kitchen and no elevator operators janitors laun dry workers or dishwashers Amberg said Our staff has been reduced by about twothirds Norman E Carle business agent of the union insisted how ever that enough building 4 u L i in L scrv caicn DiMaygio singled to left j ice employes remained on dutv lo Gordon fouled to Kurowski Kel continue operation of the hospital Icr flicd to Slaughter who madcj We nlso arc maintaining scrv the catch close to the right field ice for the army and navy men t thc he Middlebrook univer sity comptroller and secretary of the board of regents said the wall No runs one hit no errors one left Require Bonds for 35 MPH stationed said William COUNCIL BLUFFS ers charged with traveling in ex cess of 35 miles an hour in Council Bluffs will be required to post S25 bonds according to an order is sued by Municipal Judge John P Tinlcy to the police department Judge Tinley in his statement to the department said I wish to crowd a little Americanism into speeders who dont have respect for the law would meet probably WILII Jov Harold Stasscn to dis cuss the strike It may get a little dirty around here he said but we will keep all the buildings open Iowa Sedhawks Ohio State Indiana FINAL WONT USE IOWA CAMPS WASHINGTON of fice of defense health and welfare service through its social pro tection section rejected a pro posal to convert CCC camps in Iowa into camps and quarantine hospitals for girls with venereal diseases James F Byrnes above named Saturday by President Kooscvelt to direct economic stabilization was appointed te the supreme court by Sir Roosevelt on June 12 1341 At the time of his nomination to the bench he a democratic senator from South Carolina and one of the administrations key men in ffuidinlc difficult legislation through congress economic stabilization in the office of emergency manage ment with Byrnes at the head as director ln created wu nu economic stabilization hoard whh which Ihe director will consult in fixing poli cies On this board arc the secretaries of treasury agriculture commerce and labor the chairman of Ihe federal reserve boiird the piicc ad ministrator the chairman of the war labor board and two repre sentatives each of labor manage ment nnd farmers still to be ap pointed The order with respect lo wages and salaries declared that no increases or decreases shall be authorized unless notice of them is filed with the war labor board and lie board lias approved such changes Harvard Penn 1 FINAL Tile board was ordered not to approve any increases in wage raics prevailing on Sept 15 unless such increase was necessary to correct maladjustments or in equalities to eliminate substand ards of living to correct gross in equalities or to aid in the effec tive prosecution of the war The board also was ordered not to approve any decreases in wages the highest wages pnid between Jan 1 and Sepl 15 1942 unless lo correct gross in equities and to aid in the success ful prosecution of the war No increases in salaries now in excess of 55000 a year shall be granted until Otherwise deter mined by the director except in instances in which an individual has been assigned to Michigan Mich State FINAL t r 1   

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