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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - September 29, 1942, Mason City, Iowa                             DEPARTMENT OF COfP NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME Ci THE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS THIS PAPER CONSISTS OP TWO SECTIONS STALINGRAD 3 RUNWAYS OF 5600 FEET ARE BEING MAPPED Acquisition of 320 Acres More Indicated by Proposed Layout Three 5600 foot runways long enough to accommodate anything except heavy bombing planes are now being surveyed by civil aero nautics engineers on the Mason City municipal airport site and land adjoining it to the east and north City Manager Herberl T Barclay revealed Tuesday Two engineers from thc engi neering and construction divi sion of CAA31 II Price ami I M Ormsby both of Kansas Cily arc in charge of a crew which includes four other men One of the proposed runways would start at approximately the spol where the buildings of the W H Nicholas turkey farm are now locatqd and include the five forties in the northsouth line in cluding one on the north side ot the Twelfth street road Mr Bar clay said None of these five for ties is now owned by the city Acquisition of the three forties adjoining the present airport lo the north also would be necessary according to the proposed runway layout The northwestsoutheast runway would also slart at the Nicholas farm site and include 5600 feet due northwest from that point The northeastsouthwest run way would start at the southwest comer ofthe present1 airport site and end on Twelfth street road Paving of three 150 foot wide runways 5600 feet long such as are proposed would involve an expenditure of more than 000 for the laying of the con crete alone Mr Barclay pointed out Adding to Ihis the cost of hangars and other buildings the expense undoubt edly would exceed a million dollars tlie citv manager said Cost of the additional 320 acres of land needed quite possibly will fall on lhe city of Mason City ac cording lo inquiries received by Mr Barclay from lhe CAA Such a demand would involve a diffi cult financial and legal question he said since the maximum levy permitted by stale law for airport purposes would only retire about more of bonds than the city already has outstanding The airport bond issue now outstanding has practically all been spent for the acquisition of the 312 acres in the present site and the grading of the existin runways hc said He refused to hazard an estimate ot the cost of an additional 320 acres No action will be taken by the city until a formal request is received from thc government for Ihc land Mr Barclay ex plained Appearance ol thc CAA necrs is the first development n the airport situation since thc an nouncements by Senator Clyde L Herring on Sept 15 and 19 that the Avar department had author ized an expenditure of for development of the local port The senator suggested that the length of the runways indicated the airport would be used for medium bomber training Rubber Boots and Rubber Work Shoes Frozen in New Order WASHINGTON gov ernment undertook ils first ven ture toward clothing rationing Tuesday ordering a sales freeze on ruober boots and rubber work shoes effective at midnight and lasting until Oct 5 when a certi fied rationing program is lo be launched Ihe approximate location of runways now being sur veyed by CAA engineers on and adjoining the present Maion City municipal airport is shown on the map drawn by Mellang GlobeGazette staff artist The heavy black line incloses the 312 acres now owned by the citv 2XM hlf Jne Sh0ns ihc 6ight additional which would nave to be added to accommodate the three 5600 foot runways proposed by CAA The eastwest ru not essential City Manager Herbert T Barclav explained because the wind so seldom blows in those directions here SrTfh Ptf thC Twelfth street road would be necesl sitated by the proposed airport development WATERLOO TO VOTE ON AIRPORT in Bonds to Purchase Site Provided For in Proposal WATERLOO a t e rloo voters will be asked Nov 3 in conjunction with the general elec tion to authorize city council is sue of Si50000 worth of airport bonds wilh which lo purchase a silitor a municipal airport here The council Monday night called the referendum involving a threequarters of a mill annual tax levy At present Waterloo has two privately operated airports both crowded with federal pilottrain ing course classes RAF Attacks Landing Grounds in Egypt CAIRO RAF success fully attacked axis landing grounds at Bengasi Tobruk and Sidi Haneish Sunday night a joint British headcjuartersRAF com munique said Tuesday Activity on lhe El Alamcin desert front was confined again to paliot skir mishes Buy Savings Bonds and stamps from your GlobeGazelle carrier bov MARSHAL LIST SUCCEEDS BOCK Expect New Chief on Stalingrad Totally to Disregard Losses LONDON new purge by Hitler of nazi generals along the lines of last winters wholesale dismissals following the failure to lake Moscow was renorted Tues day with Field Marshal Fcdor von Bock ousted from command of his slalled army at Stalingrad and Field Marshal Williclm Ritler von Leeb replaced on lhe Leningrad front The Germaninspired Vichy ra dio reported lhat Field Marshal Siegmund List who directed lhe Balkan campaign replaced von Bock with ColonelGeneral Her mann von Hoth second in com mand In London meanwhile a mili tary commentator confirmed re ports that Field Marshal von Kuschler had replaced von Leeb on the Leningrad front where the Germans have been driven back slowly in a series of red army counterattacks List is regarded as a leading ex ponent of lightning war tactics and if as reported he is in com mand a new savage assault on Stalingrad is expected with total disregard for losses Tins 62year old commander is known ss an ar dent nazi and a ruthless tactician ALLIES APPEAR TO BE PACIFIC DRIVES Destruction of 49 Jap Planes in Solomons and Aleutians Revealed WASHINGTON dcler mined allied offensive appeared definitely under way in the far flung Pacific war theater Tues day causing ihe Japanese invad ers to fall back in New Guinea and inflicting heavy losses on enemy planes and troops in the Solomon and Aleutian islands The unleashing of allied air and ground power on two of the three strategic Pacific fronts coincided with announcement of a confer ence of the U S navy and air forces high command somewhere at sea The attacks brought des truction of 49 Japanese planes in the Solomons and Aleutians and damage to five ships in four days of raids Taking the offensive for the first lime on New Guinea Gen era MacArthurs ground forces hammered back Japanese Iroops in Ihe Owen Stanley mountains wilh an infiltrating and out flanking attack about 32 mites north of Ihe important allied base at Port Moresby MacArthurs Australian head quarters announced Monday night the attacking forces were mak ing progress for the first time since the invaders landed at Gbna Mission July 21 and began pushi ing through the heavy crocodile infested jungles toward Port Mor esby which if captured could serve as a springboard for an as sault on Australia Meanwhile allied air forces continued savage pounding of tlie 1400 More Americans Are Interned by Nazis in France Sues Star of Mrs Mi nver for Di vorce LONDON for divorce en grounds of desertion has been filed against Greer Gar son star of the movie Mrs Mini ver1 by Edward A A Snelson a member of thc civil service in India it was announced in the divorce court calendar Tuesday It was included in the undefended list for the term opening Ocl 12 VICHY States embassy learned through official channels Tuesday lhat 1400 addi tional men and 400 been interned oy German authorities in occu pied France The new arrests brought lo 1780 thc total of Americans now in German hands Thc roundup began last Thurs day when most of lhe internees were arrested it was understood but there have been scattered ar rests every day since The women have been taken to the restaurant building in the 700 of the Jardin dAcclimation in Pans The men arc interned in the suburb of Saint Denis where Jacques Doriot formerly was mayor tacks an army spokesman ob seryed may have stopped the in vaders progress by smashing vital supply lines The greatest blow lo the Nip ponese air forces during the ac tivity commencing Sept 25 was struck in the Solomons where 42 planes were shot down and three others damaged the navy department said Navy and ma rine corps fighters bombed four ships setting a cruiser afire and probably sinking a transport and ruined Japanese gun emplace ments 1A Without loss of a single U S plane the American forces bombed a Japanese cruiser and a seaplane tender and shot down three seaplanes at Tonolci harbor on Sept 25 destroyed six more enemy seaplanes damaged a sev enth hit a cruiser and probably sank a transport near Shetland is land on Sept 26 The follow lay they blasled four bombers and five fighter planes of an attacking Japanese squadron over Guadal canal Continuing their attacks Mon day the American air forces suc cessfully intercepled 25 Japanese bombers which were accompanied by 18 zero fighters and were headed for marine inslallalions on Guadalcanal The navy and ma rine xighler planes destroyed 23 of thc enemy bombers and one Zero and forced the others to jettison their bombs into the sea The marines meanwhile strengthened their hold on Guadal canal by destroying several small enemy detachments still on the island with the aid of dive bomb Tells French to Look for Allied Landing LONDON high officer ot the British army told the French people in a BBC broadcast that today more than ever before the possibilities ot a British and allied landing 011 French soil must be foreseen You must also reckon with the interventionof our navy jn French waters and attacks by the PAF against military objectives in occu pied France said the speaker The offensive of lhe allied na tions is in the making Speaking French the officer added On the day when we are sure of achieving our is none other than total defeat of Hitlers offensive will let loose No one will be told in advance of the day of attack or of the point where it will take place We will however keep our promise to let the French people know in lime The warning was similar lo one broadcasl by the BBC in the i rench service five days ago SOMERVEUJITS COMPLACENCY Declares Allies Have Taken Terrific Beating All Around Globe Buy War Savings Bonds and Stamps from your GlobeGazette carrier boy that weve lost everything ex smug sense of complacency and that is the one thing weve got to lose Lieut Gen Brehon iJ bomervell commanding gen eral of the services of supply was on record Tuesday with one of the most caustic war speeches ye1 made by a hieh military official Speaking Monday night be fore Ihe Grand lodge of Mis souri Masons Somervell said the united nations have taken a terrific shellacking all around the globe and lhat it is time that we begin to he realistic The Japanese and nazis hale us and it is high time Americans start IhrowinK some of lhat halo back in their faces he said You cant kill a man you dont hale and fear and our number one iol now is to kill nazis and Japs Weve lost all our rubber most of our tin our hemp our silk Weve lost ships by the hundred men by thc thousand Weve tost the freedom of the seas Weve lost everything except a smug sense of complacency and that is the one thingweve got to lose and lose fast or well lose our independence Somervell asked Americans not to be overcrilical of our leaders of our Indies or our military methods No matter what we do we always seem o do the wrong thing according to Monday morning quarterbacks and the hindsiffhtcrs hc said And were always wrong in thc eyes 01 those knotty powder room strategists and soda fountain admirals He castigaled management men wlio use the war effort to take ad vantage of labor calling them saboteurs and said workers who put down their tools to strike even for an hour arc in thc same category L u ttai LONDON im NAMED MEDICAL OFFICER COUNCIL BLUFFS Lt D Hennessy of Council Bluffs a graduate of the State University of Iowa has been named medical officer of the navys radio and signal school at thc University of Chicago LONDON im Prime Minis ter Winston Churchill answering a barrage o f question s in thc house of commons Tues d a y urged against lation on the time or place of an allied sec ond front of fensive an nounced the capture of Tu lear last re maining port CHURCHILL in southern Madagascar and par ried demands for a stalemcnl on r had not bombed why Britain Rome On the second front he empha sized the undcsirability o public statements or speculation on the time or place of future allied of fensive operations Such speculation he said was undesirable even if it was based on inference and not on inside information lhat be to Mr Willkie shouted someone from Ihe floor In Moscow Wendell L Willkie said he favored a second front if military leaders thought one prac ticable There was no reply to the question Peter MacDonald conservative had asked Churchill whether in view of the fact that the period 01 offensive operations by the united nations is now approach ing and secrecy was important he would impress the need for secrecy on all persons Churchill said that he wel comed the opportunity to warn of the undesirability of public statements or speculation on such operations A S CunninghamReid con servative brought up the question why Britain had not bombed Rome Churchill said he had nothing to add to his previous statements but emphasized that Ihere was no limiting factor which would prevent a bombing He repeated that he would make no statement when Reid suggested that Rome had not been bombed because of Catholic sus ceptibilities Asked by R J c Boothy con servative regarding the position m Madagascar Churchill said The success of the initial land ings in Madagascar and the fact that they were accomplished with only the lightest casualties on both sides are due in great meas ure to the efficiency of the royal navy and the speed with which it ferried troops to the beaches at the right time BARKLEY CALLS ON SENATE FOR PRICE CONTROL Makes Impassioned Plea for Congress to Vindicate Itself WASHINGTON M Senate Democratic Leader Barkley called on congress Tuesday lo ilself by carrying out speedily President Roosevelts re quest for passage of aiiliinflalion legislation through which he could lower farm price ceilings In an impassioned speech of nearly two hours before a silent attentive senate the administra tion leader appealed to the mem bers not to quarrel and haggle over technicalities over a little more profit for one group but to make it possible and manda tory for the president lo deal wilh inflation in a legal and just way He asked lhatlhe senalc firsl defeat a farm bloc amendment offered by Senators Thomas D Okla anci Hatch D N Mcx which include the costof farm la bor in the formula for fixing parily price ceilings It such a provision went to thc veto of lhe president who haS ex pressed unalterable opposiliou lo change in the parily formula Barkley said congress would either have to abandon the legis lation or eat crow by going out and passing legislation the presi dent would accept Not only were most of the sen ajrsln theiriseatsV but a fafge attendance m the galleries listened to Senator Barkley as he urged passage of the administration bill to stabilize wages and prices without he proposed farm bloc amendment Secretary OC Com merce Jesse Jones and more than a dozen members of thc house took seats among the senators President Roosevelt may des ignate the secretary of agricul ture or anybody hc sees fit to administer the price and wage control law butassum ing lie appoints Leon Ilcmjcr son price Mr Henderson will do his level best Ip administer that law in the light of thc congressional mean ing Barkley promised Referring to the Russian house fohouse defense ot Stalingrad Barkley saict We dont know how soon our men may be fighting tlie same way in some city or vil lage Before this war is over they may be fighting step by step foot by foot porch by porch room by room in France in Germany or in Tokio lie declared How miserable and cheap we must look to them to be afraid to face a popgun on the home front We must have a home fronl Wars arc not fought today bv soldiers and sailors alone All our people arc soldiers now whether dressed in uniforms or the garb of civilians Mr Roosevelts call for action by Oct 1 he said was by no means a pistol al the head of congress Barkley declared that Mr Roosevelt set lhe deadline be cause he could not beyond thc first day of October control prices and keep lhe spiral of inflation from rising unless he or congress took action Action has been delayed by a controversy over whether the cosl f farm labor should be made a factor in dclermining the parity price of farm products The house already has so provided over the administrations objections Barkiey telling the senators that they might have to stay in session Tuesday until they com pleted action on the price and wage stabilization bill said hc had urged the submission of thc problem to congress even if the president had power lo solve it He said Price Admtnistralor Leon Henderson took the same position and urged it constanlly and consislcnily mo ti v a t ed 3arkley said by a desire lo prc ierve the legislalive process and hat harmony and accord which ought to exist between the legis ative and executive branches ol our government John J Frenzen superintendent of lhe I O O F home was lhe victim of a knife wound on his left side as lhe result of an argu ment wilh one of thc residents of liie home lale Monday afternoon John W GiUingham 79 resi dent of lhe home four years is being held by police for investi gation GiUingham admitted to police that he unintentionally stabbed Frenzeu during an argument when he reached up to grab Supt Fren zens hands after the superinten ded had slapped him twice on the side of the head with an open hand GiUingham had a long butcher knife in his hand at lhe time of argument He had been topping carrots wilh other residents of tne home Supt Frenzen was taken to the Park hospital for treatment The wound was considered serious f s Head Sed NEW IN Mdart 9bed CITY IS PUSHED BY NAZI TANKS Berlin Claims More Ground Taken in North Part of Metropolis By ROGER D GREEXE Associated Press War Editor Marsha Semeoii Timoshenkos Si i JOHN j FRENZEN V serious condition ROAD THROUGH PARK IS CLOSED Barricades Erected at Both Ends of Clear Lake State Park Road The lake shore road through Clear Lake stale park was closed lo traffic Tuesday A crew ol workmen under Slate Conserva tion Officer J z Slevcns erected plank barricades al lhe edge of the park property nearest Clear Lake city and also at the other end ot the woven fire fence which has flanked Ihc road The blacktop paving on the road will be torn up and salvaged in the near future by Iowa slate highway commission employes Mr Stevens said The road has been officially abandoned and the property now is part of the stale park A turnaround will be con jstnictcd opposite lhe custodians I collage where tiic road now ends i northwest of the city ened their counter assault in the 36 day old siege of Stalingrad Tuesday hammering the German north flank on a 40mile front be tween the Don and Volga rivers while nazi tanks pressed a new threat within the embattled me tropolis A Berlin broadcast asserted that German troops had occu pied more ground in Stalin Brads northern district mov ing up under a curtain of in cessant bombing attacks on sov iet defenses German military quarters ad mitted that the Russians were counterattacking furiously but dismissed them as having been frustrated At noon a bulletin from red army headquarters said Russian shock troops attacking in the northwest zone broke into the enemy defenses and captured sev eral heights More than three companies ot German infantry were reported wiped out in attacking the inter river salient whore thc uazis pre viously announced they had erected a barrier to guard their main siege armies While battle of Stalin Krad blazed with undiminished fury the soviet command nounced that Russian striking out on the Moscow front had broken through German defenses north west of Rzhev killed about 2500 nazis and recaptured 25 villages in two days of fighting Red army soldiers were also re ported to have seized a strategic ally important height near R2hcv and held in against five German counterattacks nzhev is a key bastion in the German winter defense line 130 miles northwest of Moscow The soviet command acknowl edged lhat armorscreened Ger man infantry attacks had forced the Russians to withdraw anew in the Mozdok region of the central Caucasus 50 miles north of thc Grozny oil fields but declared red army gunners killed 200 nazis and the conservation officer reported and dead end road1 signs will be placed al thc forks of Ihc road on both sides of Ihc park The barricades will be painted wilh diagonal stripes and protected with reflectors during thc night he said Thc only entrance to thc park will now be at the southwest cor ner 93 HAVE LEFT POSITIONS IOWA CITY staff members of the University of owa hospitals and medical col egc have left their positions to join the armed forces the schools medical bulletin disclosed j BODY OF HUNTER FOUND LACROSSE Wis body of Le Roy Enger 17 West Salem was recovered from Lake Feshonoc several hundred feet from shore He was the firsl hunl mg casualty in thc La Crossc area this season Weather Report FORECAST MASON CITY Much warmer Tuesday afternoon Tuesday night and Wednesday forenoon Fresh winds IOWA Warmer Tuesday night and Wednesday forenoon MINNESOTA Not much change in temperature Tuesday night andWednesday forenoon ex cept somewhat warmer south west portion Tuesday nighl oc casional light rain norlhweit portion Tuesday night IN MASOZV CJTY GlobeGazette weather statistics Maximum Monday 52 Minimum Monday night 34 At 8 a m Tuesday 37 YEAR AGO Maximum Minimum RI 29 Bloody street fihline raged throughout tlic night inside Stalingrad as the Germans sought to expand a wedge driven into a factory settlement Monday by two nazi infantry divisions ahout 80000 troops led by 150 tanks Russian accounts said that thc thrust cost the invaders ahnut 4on men and 50 tanks and that other nnzis were killed Dispalclics lo lhe army news paper Red Star conceded that tin Germans had occupied several favorable new positions in the shifting struggle within the city Thc newspaper citing a typical example ot the closequarter fight ing said an area 30 yards by 250 yards changed hands four limes before Russian Iroops finally won Swarms of Tanks Planes Back Reds MOSCOW Sem yon Timochenkos counter offen sive backed by swarms of planes and tanks was blasting lhe Ger mans along a 40 mile front be tween the Don and Volga rivers above Stalingrad Tuesday stead ily driving them back Frontline dispatches said the Russians also were on the west bank of Ihc Don trying lo drive a wedge Into German positions there and disrupt reinforce ments and supply lines for the nazis inside Stalingrad The government organ Izvcstia said soviet batleries had destroyed pontoon and sunk numerous troop laden boats trying to cross a river This probably was thc Don river which German reinforce ments for Stalingrad musl cross Red Star the soviet army news paper reported that it had not rained in three months but Stalin grad had its first light frost Mon day The ground was baked as hard as stone and thick white film of dust covered thc earth Soviet progress above Stalin grad while steady was ncces   

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