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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: September 26, 1942 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - September 26, 1942, Mason City, Iowa                             OEPAHTMCNT OF NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME THE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS THIS PAPER CONSISTS OP TWO SECTIONS sEcnw QMS NO 302 EDSGAINf RESH GROUND EARLIEST SNOW IN NORTH IOWA CAUSESDAMAGE Communication Lines Tree Branches Felled Corn Beyond Danger North Iowas first snow this Jail began Friday night the earliest snow of comparable in tensity for this section within the memory of most residents Last lau a Hurry of snow was record ed Nov l and the first heavy snowfall was Nov 5 Armistice day brought the first snow 1940 and snow did not fa in 1939 until Dec 20 Records do not show any measurable amount of snow for September as far back as the GlobeGazette daily weather re ports have been maintained for nearly 20 years A total of 54 inch Say These Girls on First Snowfall X SNOW FLURRIES of an inch of P r e c i p i tation was reported in Mason City for the night Rain which started late Fri day afternoon turned to snow which melted however almost as rapidly as it Jell S a t vi r d a v lowans awoke to of snow on morning North ijnd a light blanket ui s0w en the tres and grass Fresh winds of the night before had died down but snovy was still falling in large Hakes at 8 oclock Saturday morn ing Crops in North Iowa will not be damaged by the snowfall according to County Agent Marion Olson Frost has al ready done what damage could be done by nipping about one fourth of the soybean crop The corn crop is 80 per cent beyond danger of frost accord ing to Mr Olson and the snow will not affect it other than re tard its drying Communication lines were bad ly hit in North Iowa however repair gangs of the local tele phone and electric lines being busv throughout the nisht From 11 p m Friday until a m Saturday police and firemen were called repeatedly because of fallen wires burned out transformers branches in the streets wires shorted etc Police were called on special duty throughout the night and the E rePai Sang put in a full nights Transformers were burned out at Ninth and North Federal ave nue and between Eighth and Ninth streets on North Federal avenue between n and 12 oclock it morningtojjettheir first taste of Wjntel i r aim Lock photo Kay en ay engraving Orders Gasoline Ration DES MOINES weather bureau Saturday fore cast a hard freeze for some sections of Iowa Saturday nisht Lowest temperature probablv will be about 20 dcsrces aloDR the northern border of the state the bureau said It will not be quite so cold in other sections Following is the forecast for Mason City Cold and Windy with showers or snow flurries Saturday afternoon colder with liffht snow Saturday night low est temperature Saturday nielil 20 desrees continued cold Sun day forenoon Firemen were called to 809 North Federal avenue at 1117 o clock Friday night when wires were reported down Police were called to Sixth street and Madison avenue south west where wires had shorted and were burning red at oclock Limbs from trees were in the street at Sixth and Van Bnren avenue southwest A limb also was broken off in the 200 block on North Federal avenue Firemen were called to the Clover Farm store 1341 North ort federal avenue at oclock Sat urday morning when an electric motor in the cooler burned out At oclock Saturday morn ing police were called to Second h P5nnsylvania avenue northeast where wires were down From here police were caled to Fifth street and Penn sylvania avenue where were down DATE REMAINS UNDETERMINED Appeals to Drivers to Keep Speed Down to 35 Miles an Hour WASHINGTON X Rubber Czar William M Jeffers went the limit Saturday and ordered na tionwide gasoline rationing to save tires In his first public order since the issuance of the special rubber committee report the Union Pa cific railroad president charged with conserving the nations stockpile oC rubber directed the office of price administration to extend lo the entire country the same restrictions now endorsed in the east This is a game he said in which we can all win or all lose The date upon which the order will become effective probably not before Nov l was left un determined and Price Adminis trator Leon Henderson will de cide whether the basic 4qallon weekly ration will p r a i I throughout the United States as it docs in 17 eastern seaboard states At Ihe same time Jeffers ap pealed to drivers to keep then feet off the accelerators and slow down to 35 miles an hour Jeffers was granted wide pow ers to save the nations supply of the vital war material and his di rective appeared to settle the question whether the OPA or the office of defense transportation would control the program JcUers said office of price adminis tration is hereby directed and authorized to institute nationwide gasoline rationing on the same basis as the gasoline rationing program now existing in the east ern states will be understood that afr of a nation iiju Wlde gasoiinc iationing the olficc of defense transportation will re view the program from the stand point of its effects upon the trans portation service of the nation existing arrangement be tween the ODT and the OPA rela tive to rations for commercial ve hicles in accordance with general order ODT No 21 will be contin Another Lexington Christened QUINCY Mass U S S Lexington the second aircraf carrier to be launched by the navj since the bombing of Pearl Har bor will slide down the ways o the Fore River Shipbuilding com pany here Saturday It is the fifth American nava vessel bearing the name of Lex ington and the second carrier Th first earner Lexington sank iron internal explosions while limping back to port after receiving dam m the battle of he Coral sS rittecn communities namec Lexington have wired Secretarj ofJNavy Frank Knox their con gratulations on launching of new carrier and the navys deci sion to name it other ships o the line that have brought honoi and tradition to the service Launching ceremonies sarily will be restricted because of wartime regulations but prin cipals in the brief ceremony wil be officers of the first carrier Lex ington and others closely identi fied with the history she made Urs Theodore Douglas Robin son of Mohawk N Y whose late husband was assistant secretary of the navy from 1824 to IG9 wil serve as sponsor She christened the last Lexington launched 17 years ago in the same yard Rear Admiral Frederick C bncrman commander of the first Lexington when she fousht in the south Pacific will deliver the principal address ued and extended throu nation ihout the RECOVER SI300 DKS MOINES police radio broadcast a state report KUDU a report Saturday that taken from a private home in Grinnell had been recovered Details of the theft and recovery were not im mediately available Two Killed in Truck Crash of Cresco men were in stantly killed one mile east of Crcsco at Saturday morninc when the truck in which they were riding struck a hollow tree which had fallen across the high way after being broken by the heavy snow The nien were Peter J Slenseth 50 and Robert Phillips about 20 both of Calmar No other car was involved in the accident Jhc cab of the truck was demol ShenCf Percy Haven Coroner t L Bradley and Dr W A Bock oven of Crcsco were called to th scene of the accident Bodies wcro l3kel1 the Bradley funeral home in Cresco Many trees and branches in the Cresco vicinity were down due to the heavy snow of Buy War Savings Bonds and stamps from your GlobeGazette carrier boy the lowo Nebraska Iowa Huskers Fail to Score in 1st Period IOWA CITYAlthough fowa Hawkeycs drove into ivu braska territory in the first quar InLDT SaturdaJhey failld to Deri Bill Stauss dropped pass in the end zone Partngton of Nebraska in tercepted Farmers pass on the next play lo halt the drive The period ended in a scoreless tic FIRST QUARTER Hoerner took Schleichs kick on the five and returned to the Ti Vacant was stopped on the line Hoerner bucked to the 44 Hocr nor got a yard Farmer lacked out on the Husker 24 Eisenhart made a yard at center Bradley quick Kicked to the Iowa 14 Stauss fumbled and was spilled tor a two yard loss Hoerner failed to gain on an end run Stauss fumbled on tne line of scrimmage and Va canti recovered Bradley took Farmers kick on the Iowa 47 and returned to the 37 BULLETINS BRITISH SINK SHIPS LONDON sub marines have sunk at least five and probably seven axis supply ships recently in the Mediterran ean and have seriously dam aged another the admiralty an nounced Saturday TROUBLE IN FRANCE LONDON Pierre Laval hs sacked Jacques Bcnoisl nicchfn secretary of slate in the Vichy foreign ministry because He was a ringleader in a plot to supplant Laval with the more Jacques Dorjot Paris editor Fichling French sources reported Saturday night TO CONSIDER FIGHT WASHINGTOX WlVar de partment officials who would not be quoted by name prom ised Saturday that consideration would be Bivcn the offer of oc Louis and Billy Conn to go liroujh with their heavyweight title fight without pay of Tiiv kind P anj CHECK TRANSPORTATION WASHINGTON PThe jus tice department it was learned Saturday is prepared to launch a ffrand jury investigation cen tering m nine cities which will cover the entire transportation car ricrs waterways and airlines BLOC SENATORS ASKSHOWDOWN ON PARITY BILL Thomas Will Demand Vote on Amendment to Raise Price Bases By JACK BELL WASHINGTON bl leaders insisted Saturday on for ing a showdown next weclc on proposal to jack up the levels coi trolling agricultural prices dcspi administration claims a compro mise would be adopted Senator Thomas sa that despite any halfway peat moves the administration migl make he would demand a sena vote on an amendment to tl antiinflation bill raising the bas of parity prices by about I9 pe to include the cost of Ian labor Thomas held a temporary par liamentary advantage requiring a vote first on the amendment lie and Senator Hutch D N IM offered before a compromise proposal submitted by Demo cratic Leader Barkley Ky coiild be brousht up for a roll call Barkley indicated a vote might come Monday when the senate reconvenes after a week end recess 9 V Conceding that the Thoma proposal might carrv BarUle said he was confident it would h supplanted immediately by h amendment The latter woul leave the parity standard undis turbed but would direct Preside Roosevelt to lift individual pric they didnot re fleet returns to the producer winch took into account increase labor and other costs on the farm Parity is a standard compute to give farmers a return equal i purchasing power to a past favos able period Under terms of th pending bill price ceilings couli not be applied on aim commodi ties below parity Barkley said some susreestions Iiad been made to alter his compromise amendment to re quire the liftinB of ceilings where they did not reflect the increase in farm wages ana other costs since January 1 1011 He said he favored giviti Ui price administrator a free ham but Senator George D Ga con tended that if some such dnii were not inserted actions to lif ceilings would depend entirely on whether there were future rathci than past increases in farm laboi costs Though they were reported gain ing ground in the senate tralion forces still faced an uphil battle aready has passed the bill with an amendment iden tical to that offered by Thoma and Hatch but Barkley said h believed a compromise could be reached between the senate ana house versions if they varied Sells Bonds in Jeep But Gets No Sleep His Health to Keep PHILADELPHIA MFoisix days Joe Kenncy has been chained to an army jeep in downtown Phil Saturday he went home to sleep Kennedy an automobile stunt driver locked himself in Monday and said hed stay there until he had sold 5100000 in war Early Saturday lie had passed hi quota by S35000 Im groggy he said as Acting Mayor Bernard Samuel prepared to unlock the shackles but maybe the treasury which approved the plan will think it was worth it Weather Report IOWA Light mixed rain and snow north and east portions Satur day light Snow showers cast Saturday night colder west Sat urday and entire state with tem peratures near or below freezing Saturday night moderately strong winds IN MASON CITY Maximum Friday Minimum Friday At 8 a m Saturday Precipitation YEAR AGO Maximum Minimum 46 32 32 Si Believe Reds to Hold A Russian offensive this winter mav not train mv more territory than it did last winter ihcv Lid but fr would succeed in pinnins down the Germans to campaign in Russia next sprhig and summer ihis is a most important factor in allied second Plans however belated they are from the soifet lasAfivP montls of campaigning from Kurak to the Caucasus has made big inroads in both Russian and Ge man strength But these military circles do not betteve the essential strength of either side has been destroyed They consider the German army still the worlds greatest of Md UlC RUSS1an am Sti11 They said the intensity of battles such as those of Se vas opol and Stalingrad were likely to obscure the fact that modern warfare is considerably less costly h terms of lives than the last war One reason is that there more slack periods between offensive spasms y y th that any diversion which will force the withdrawal of 30 or 40 German divisions will make a decisive difference indicates a great credit to Ihc soviet and considerable red army reserves London observers do not expect the Russians o be fuly capabe of a full offensive this winter b t under conditions which prohibit big troon movements and hamstring the defenders supply incs a serieTof heavy local regarded as corn letdv t as bio Siege Enters Second Month VaJiant defenders of Stalingrad canled the battle for AR driving into the streets A Russian newspaperman said it is now a citv of wreckage ancltrembling earth J of Oaring RAF Assault Halts Quisling Meeting in Oslo Northwestern Iowa Seahawksd LONDON at noment of rising axis dissension n Norway and violent new anti crman outbreaks in Oslo the 1AF made a daring daylight as ault upon nazi headquarters in ic Norwegian capital Friday and ent the followers of Vidkun Quis ngs puppet regime scurrying to over from a nearby rally Four raiding British bombers wept m low and dropped their omos from about 100 feet altitude score hits on gcstapo buildings ie air ministry announced One ntish plane was lost and the air nmistry said tartly that German negations that three of the at acking bombers were shot down onfirm the effects of the attack quisling who had summoned members of his nationalist socialist arty to the rally in Norway in n effort to quell discontent dc ounccd the raid in an address bc ore his followers Saturday as one y RAF murder planes Quisling announced the raid cas alties as four dead and 40 in ired He asked the rally ror ap roval to bury the dead at state Stockholm dispatches reported at another flight of 25 planes elieved lo be British swept nursday night across the Swedish est coast which might well be in e region southeast of Oslo The Germans who have shown increasing nervousness at devel opments in Scandinavia immedi ately pounced upon this incident to violation of by Britisl called the latest Swedish neutrality bombers The connection between the Planes over Sweden and the small scale raid on Oslo the first upon the Norwegian capital i more than a year was not clear but the Brnsh recently have been engaged m a spreading aerial mincsowTn campaign in German i and that clcar was that the Germans a e ermans were finding themselves in hot hot water m Norway With that stratagically located andinavian country command ng heightened attention from both the Bn sh and the Germans of ficial Norwegian sources said in London that Quislings party was von F that Falkcnhorst nazi occupation commander had asked Hitler to dismiss Quisling and fully Ger manize Norway Even while the Quislings were meeting over the weekend contin uing outbreaks were reported Oslo CRUSHATTACKS MADE BY NAZIS ON STALINGRAD Russia Reports Troops Holding Grimly in Besieged Metropolis GREENE War Editor Michigon Great Lakes By ROGER D Associated Frcss Adolf Hitlers grasp in the 3i dayold siege of Stalingrad Sat urday as the red armies sained fresh ground northwest of the Volga metropolis crushing 32 rniiin counterattacks in 43 hours and recaptured a strategic position within the city By soviet account it was the fourth consecutive day thai ihc Ocrnian assault hud been stopped Hitlers field headquarters jniiff accustomed to proclaim the swift fall or city after city now focused its attention on the capture of single buildings the fight for Stalingrad buildings belonging to the com munist party situated near the bank of the Volga were torn from the in embittered fight llle German command said clicr lUaqks against the northern barrier were re pelled The Vichy radio notoriously unreliable asserted thai German shock troops had driven IhrouRh Stalingrad to theVolga at several Dispatches to Ken Star said tJie Germans ivcre Hearing oul and that soviet troops from sired barricades charred 1iiililuiKs and foxholes in the damp earth were holding erim As the tide of buttle swayed oscfc and forth from street to lreet Red Star siid ny local gains scored by the invaders were made by crawling across moun tains or bodies and burned tanks German warplanes were re ported switching their attacks lo river crossings evidently rearing to drop their bombs on the confused battle scene lest they annihilate their own troops Nevertheless ihe Russians said food and munitions continued to flow to the defenders from supply storeson the cast bank of the river Once again he German radio boasted hopefully thai there can be no doubl left with the enemy regarding the result of this battle and Berlin movie audiences were snown films from the front depicting German troops penetrating into Stalingrads once beautiful but now rubblelittered boulevards It was just two weeks ago that nazi troops first entered the citys suburbs and that 11 v Germans declared the battle had reached its final phase Soviet headquarters said Icr was pouring masses of re serves into Ihc critical north west 7one and launching re peated counterattacks in all at tempt to stem the Russian of fensive which has gouged deep into the nazi left flank The Germans are constantly bringing up reserves lo this sec tor the Russian command said but it declared that three major nari attacks were smashed Friday with 1500 Germans killed Tn the Stalingrad area fierce lighting continues red army headquarters announced in its midday communique In one street engagement a Ruard unit destroyed 10 enemy tanks and killed 261 Germans In another sector our troops re pulsed an attack wipmg out a company of enemy infantry Northwest of Slaliiiprad the tcrmans launched a number of counterattacks which were rc Plilscd wilh heavy losses In one sector soviet troops advanced and occupied a more advantageous position Front dispatches said the red navy s Volga river gunboats per forming like ivcr tanks con tinued to blast German artillery armored concentrations and troops while rangefinders posted atop two hills recaptured in the northwest directed soviet artillery batteries in shelling the grey Don bend Notre Dame Wisconsin Purdue Fordham FINAL   

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