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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: September 25, 1942 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - September 25, 1942, Mason City, Iowa                             NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME THE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS PARITY COMPROMISE i THIS PAPER CONSISTS OK TWO SECTIONS NAZIS CONCEDE DELAY IN FALL OF STALINGRAD German Assaults in Metropolis Again Halted by Russians By ROGER D GREEXE x Associated Press War Editor Bayonetwielding Russian troop were reported to have swept Hi Germans from two hills northwes of Stalingrad Friday wedge into Adolf Hitlers vita left flank and now the officia Berlin radio openly acknowledged The fall of the city may be de layed for some time The broadcasts alibi was tliat Hitler preferred a gradual sys ernatic advance to save men Soviet dispatches estimated German tosses in killed wound ed and missing at nearly a divi sion 15000 troops a day Hitlers field headquarters said nazi assault troops taptured fur ther fortified points in fierce street fighting within Stalingrad and added Soviet relief attacks against the northern barrier erected by and allied troops ver repulsed in hard fighting This was the third successive day that the German command noted severe defensive fighting against the Russian counterof fensive north of the city Coupled with the blow to the nazi left wins the Russians de clared that German assaults in side the battletorn Volga me tropolis again faltered and broke The Germans got inlo several houses creating a threat to out flanks red army headquarters said in its midday bulletin So viet troops counterattacked and restored the situation Northwest of Stalingrad Ger man attacks were repulsed So viet tank crews destroyed two German tanks and wiped out about two enemy companies ap proximately 1000 In fighting for a populated place our troops wiped out about 500 Germans took prisoners and captured war material Civilians of Stalingrad were reported swarmingr out of their cellars factory shelters and caves in the Volga cliffs to help turn back the nazi tide Thous ands had already been with drawn across the river when Stalingrads fail seemed inevit able but others refused lo leave Dispatches said the fighting was so bitter that even thc surrender of a house was regarded as a near calamity As the battle flamed into its second month amid indications that the German siege armies were beginning to waver a Rus sian war coiTcspondent pictured Stalingrad as a scene of chaotic wreckage on rembling earth lit hy explosions and heavy with the odors of cordite and death On the river beach are the corpses of women and children killed by German bombs he wrote The Stalingrad waterfront is a great patch ot ruins By night fresh soviet troops cross the river on barges and boats The wounded arc removed the same way Voljja punboals cruisinp un and down Hc river continued to blast thc Germans and in Thursdays operations alone they were credited with de stroying eight nazi siege guns and a large number of troops Russian street fighters attack ing from sandbagged barricades and fortified houses within the city were reported to have killed more than 200 Germans and de stroyed five tanks seven anti tank guns and four mortars in a single phase of the gigantic battle In the central Caucasus Russian headquarters acknowledged that the red armies withdrew from a populated place after wiping out a company of German cavalry and from this it appeared that Hi nazis were stepping up the fury of their drive against ihe Groznv oil fields some 50 miles away Report Japs Holding 6000 in Philippines By EDWARD E HOSIER WASHINGTON If Lieut Gen Jonathan M Wainwiight an an estimated 6000 other America defenders of Bataan and Corregi dor were reported Friday to b war captives of the Japanese ir a prison camp at Tarlac north o Manila m the Philippines A partial list of about 00 pris turn shed by some of the smal IT Persons permitted to Jeave Manila also contained the names of four other American and iihpmo army general officers officers General Wamwright command er oE the Philippine forces aftei Douglas MacArthur was ord ered to Australia was taken witl ne fall of Corregidor on May 6 and that of morc 60000 others last reported on Ba taan and Corregidor has since been in doubt Those in the partial list of pris oners included Maj Gen William Sharp Monkton Md com mander of the AmericanFilipino orces on the southern island of Mindanao Brig Generals Lewis C Jeebe a native of Ashton Iowa Clinton A Pearce Sierre Madre Cal and Fidel V Segundo of the Dhihppine army Others named included Ma JHi Md holder of the distinguished ervice cross for heroism in falow ng up a bridge in the face of leavy enemy fire and Col Jesse rraywick Montgomery Ala redited by the Japanese with ommunicating their teVms sur ender to General Sharp in Min anao after Corregidors fall The Tarlac prison camp is the ormer American army Camp JDpnnell about 65 miles north of lamia Some of the prisoners ere reported to have been sent rst to Manilas Bilibid prison sed as a war clearing house by ie Japanese Prison camps other nan that at Tarlac have not been dentified Some 3500 civilians are in erned in the buildings and rounds of Santo Tomas univer ty on the outskirts of the city nd an additional 1000 mostly ged ill or very young are per nitted to live in the city In Manila virtually all liomes Americans have been taken ver by the Japanese Stocks of ores have been either looted or onsumed Villkie Inspects GermanRed Front MOSCOW L Mllkie returned lo Moscow Fri ay from a 14hour jeep car trip to the GermanRussian fron which took him well within ear shot of duelling artillery With Lieut Gen Lilyushenko o the red army and a party o Americans Willkie rode for miles across seas of mud He said he had a really firsthand opportu mty to study the Russian troops a tinuejltt First Women Ferry Pilots was very much im work and pressed The soldiers asked him as had Moscow workers when the United States and Britain would estab lish a second front ha said A Weather Report FORECAST MASON CITY Warmer Friday afternoon Friday night a Saturday forenoon occasional showers Friday night and Sat urday forenoon quite FO cold Friday and Friday evening Intermit tent light rains west portion Friday afternoon and evening and extreme southwest portion Friday forenoon warm er west portion Not Quite so cold east portion Friday and Friday evening Scattered light rains southwest and extreme west portion Friday afternoon and evening IN MASON CITY Maximum Thursday 45 Minimum Thursday 21 At 8 a m Friday 33 Heavy frost YEAR AGO Maximum 7 Minimum w Precipilation jg lies Long Island N j iciesa Jstnes MtvmsDuro iWilEAT N TRAIN CRASH Seek to Identify 12 Bodies Puiled From Charred Wreckage DICKERSON Md oad officials and state police Fri ay sought to identitfy 12 bodies emoved from the charred and visted wreckage of three Irains collision was believed to ave cost the lives of at least 20 eisons Wreck crews worked through ut the night to pull apart the last lecesof the Pullman car in which npst of the victims died when fire olloweci the crash of two pas enger trains and a fast freight ailroad officials said they still ad not accounted for eight per ons A man who had been identified by Baltimore and Ohio officials as the engineer of one of the passenger trains meanwhile was charged with manslaughter Magistrate William D Clark of Montgomery county asserted that Maryland State Police Sgt John J Cassidy had sworn out a war S ocnm r Nashville Tenn Betty H Gil HelS Man ClaU F Wv New V 5Clark Englewood N J and Adela Grahl Recommends Deferring Men Needed in Agriculture Ctii111 Statement Follows Conference With Farm Group Leaders DES MOINES Gen Charles H Grahl Iowa selective service director said Friday he recommended deferment of class 1A registrants whose induction would seriously impair the pro duction or efficiency of a farm unit General Grahl said n thht Raymond Rufus McClelland of Baltimore did feloniously kill J M niihTrt first victim to be Clark said he would hold a hear ing on the charge on Oct 16 and that meantime McClelland had been held under 33000 bond The B t O tracks in the narrow gully where the wreckage was lodged were still jammed early Friday by the Diesel engine which pulled one of the trains and by steel pipe which had toppled to the tracks from five gondola wu dulll JUVHI UlUil boards are being advised further that there will be many in stances where in order to safe guard the agricultural situation it will be necessary to grant addi tional deferments of men who have been previously deferred The state selective service heads statement followed a meeting Thursday of farm group leaders and officials called by Gov A Wilson The faun leaders assured Ihc selective service official that they seek no blanket deferment of farm workers They pointed out however that industry andvolun ALLIES CONTINUE PACIFIC DRIVES By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS British troops were overrunning French Madagascar Friday to eliminate that 1000mile island ft ilng 1C coast of diaft Africa as a base for axis under Axis Attack on Convoy Repulsed LONDON nava forces in their biggest Arctic vie ory of tlie war have destroyed a east 40 German planes and sun two and possibly six enemy sub marines in a fourday naval am an attack on a Russianbonne admiratJr announced A communique announced Ilia two German submarines were al most certainly sunk and four oth ers seriously damaged It admitted the loss of the destroyer Somali whicl was torpedoed and later broke in two and sank K nrVi Ihc loss oi tlie 8lDton mine sweeper Lcda which was torpedoed and sunk The vessel carried a normal com plement of so men The British losl four naval Planes but three of the plot were saved the admiralty said ihe convoy was sighicd by Ger nan planes and submarines Sepl 0 and the attack began throe days aicr a communique announced It said allied carrierborne laval an fighters and other planes and antiaircraft guns destroyed 7 planes and probably de itroyed or damaRed many others n fierce attacks Sept 13 At least 24 planes were de stroyedSept Hlt said The admiralty reported one en emy submarine probably was damaged seriously in the early stages of lie running On Sept 15 the convoy and es cort vessels were subjected to hi on and Jow level bombing attacks Jot three hours The admiralty esti mated that from 50 to 70 enemy nlnnes participated and said Un the same day we made 111 othcr v c r y promising attack against a Uboat The final German attack against tlie convoy was carried out by dive bombers two of which were shot down ihe communique was inflicted on Uiub f ui HAI UUUL1 seas raiders preying on the vital allied supply nes to India Lnma Russia and the middle east In London the foreign office announced that following the cap ture of Tananrive the capital British forces had placed Mada gascar under military rule to in sure law and order Pending t iunaing establishment of friendly regime The Vichy French flag will con rly OVC1 lne island it was sovereignty T j inu tecr enlistments in the navy army marine corps and coast guard as well as selective service have cut into the farm labor supply General Grahl emphasized that men deferred as necessary in agri culture and industry are contribut ing definitely to the war effort There will be cases where ngle men will of necessity be retained in deferred status both in agriculture and industry as key and essential men even after men nonessential occupations with of France remains In the southwest unaffected Pacific Gen acc e Douglas MiicArtlnirf headquar ters announced that allied war planes pressed home dcvasUlin new attacks on Japanese commu nication lines in the New Guinea battle zone and pounded enemy in New Britain Timor and the Solomon Islands American flying fortresses were officially credited with scoring a direct hit on an 8000ton Japa nese cargo ship at Rabaul New Britain leaving it in flames Other allied fliers set Japanese huts afire and strafed the air drome at Kokoda New Guinea advance baj NonOperating Rail Employes Ask Raise CHICAGO man agement and labor sources which declined to be quoted reported Friday that 15 brotherhoods of nonoperaling employes had noti fied the carriers of demands for a 20 cent an hour wage increase with a minimum of 70 cents an hour and a closed shop Thc sources said railroad opera tors employing members of Ihe brotherhoods were being served with notices of Ihe demands at Ilieir executive offices throughout I the nation Friday The nonoperating unions of personnel such as clerks telegraphers and signalmen rep resent more than 300000 workers METHODISTS CONVENE STORM LAKE lhan 400 persons registered Thursday for the northwest Iowa Methodist conference here The Rev James A Workman of Chicago associate secretary of the general board of lay activities address Thursday mghls session Senators Lean to Substitute Plan Sea Wars Not Going Well So Axis Propagandists Are at It Again V i T By SIDNEY WILLIAMS United Press Staff Correspondent LONDON and Germany in communiques be lieved to be a tacit confession that their sea wars were not go ing according to plan said Fri day that Japanese warships were operating in the Atlantic and that German units were in the Indian ocean Japan camp through first in obviously prearranged an nouncements Imperial headquarters at Tokio said Part of the Japa nese naval forces are collabor funBATlthaxis naval unils Ihc Atlantic ocean One Japa nese submarine operating in the Altanlic was recently refitted at a certain German naval base and returned to the theater of operations These operations parallel operalions of the Ger man navy in the Indian ocean This is most significant as rep resenting joint naval operations against enemies of the axis A few hours later the German high command repeated the Japanese communique and add ed This is of basic importance viewpoint of opera The communique said spe cifically that the Japanese war ships were submarines It said German naval units had collaborated with thc Japa nese in thc Indian ocean Reliable British informants said it was possible Jananese submarines were operating in the Atlantic but there were certainly no surface warcrafl there They emphasized it was of no importance if Japan liad submarines in the Atlantic since il had submarines capable of making the journey from home bases Observers noted that two Japanese admirals based at Berlin as special attaches had arrived at Sofia Bulgaria Thursday after a visit to Tur key Experts said it was apparent that thc Japanese and German admiralties were trying to blow up the importance and extent of their operations to offset the effects of a war which for the moment at least was not going well for them on any front Japanese propagandists wrip Sled and squirmed in heir at lempls to explain why the United Slates marines had been able lo land in lie Solomon is MAY ESTABLISH SINGLE MARKE OF FARM CROPS Government Purchasim Organization Would Follow Action by F R WASHINGTON of giant government purchasing 01 eaniziition to create in effect single market for farm product was reported Friday lo be one pos sible result if President Rooscve decides on direct action to stabiliz prices and wages First of all if thc program un derstood to have been outlined fo him were followed the presiden would allocate the nations sup plies ot whatever commoditii were to be brought under contro with a request to thc primar markets to buy within certai price limits and to sell within specified markupto the seeondai markets The wholesalers and re toilers would be under price reu lalions already in effect The actual force of this initial order which might specify areas of distribution for some products so as tn equalize pur chasing be no more than that of a rcriucsl but as a presidential request in wartime it uouttl carry consid erable weight A similar method was used in fixing prices on many ilcms prior to enactment of thc price control law Stragglers could be brought into me through control of transporla 1011 and priorities it was cx laincd If defections became erious enough to threaten the cn ire program then the allocation logram could be backed up by requisitioning order using the Commodity Credit corporation the operating agency There are other means bywhich the overall problem could be handled some experts say but thc allocation plan appears to be the most probable choice Mr Roosevelt is understood to have had Ihc orders for such a Program on his desk since before Labor day and was prepared to use them until hc decided at Ihc last mmutc In Kivc congress a new opportunity to rtctl with die Problem Some of his closest ad visers urccd the slower course in the belief lliat flic presidents Position would be stronger if hc eventually decided to act di rectly Thc allocation power lies largely m the second war powers bills which removes from the rcquisf tioning law thc ban against any machinery or equipment wnicli is in acututl use in connec tion with any operating factory or business and which is necessary lo the operation of such factory or Another law provides authority to establish priorities and allocate material and is broad enough lo proposal directing President CRooseveltVOfo lift where they did not reflect to producers the in of labor and creased costs other items The latter amendment would void ay change in the method ot computing parity President Roosevelt has said that he was unalterably opposed to chanc ing this standard Many senators who have bceu committed to vote for the Thomas amendment have indicated to ma uiui the compromise proposal is more workable and more satisfac tory Barklcy said adding It docs not have thc vice of re writing the parity formula However Thomas told report ers ho thought thc compromise uas a meaningless jumble of words and would insist on n vote first on the amendment hc and Hatch offered There were reports thai in order to avoid a prior votc on lie ThomasHatch proposal the administration leadership mierht move during the day in send Ihe bill back to thc bank ins committee for speedy re drafting to include ihe compro mise provision HJr is occurred the Thpmas position ami administration compro mise would come to a vote first BarkJey sifc was little chance of any decision bv the senate Friday on any of the major points in thc bilJ indicating that a showdown might be postponed Monday This probably would delay final enactment of the bill until nfte the October I deadline set by Piosident Roosevelt in his mes sage to congress on Sept 1 asking or autnority lo cut farm prjcc ceilings bade from J10 per cent of parity to 100 per cent and say g that unless congress acted he would T Administration senators decided o ask Leon Henderson the idmnistrator 10 outline actions cover all and orders deemed necessary or accepted by both louse and senate The house al has defeated the adminis ration by voting to revise the formula upward and therc y lift farm ceiling prices Paritjis a standard calcu lated to equalize the returns a farmer receives from his crops with the prices of thc manu h Proccsscd goods bv he house and now landing before the senate which directs President Roosevelt to stabilize inccs wages and salaries at Sept 1 levels so far as prac jical no ccilmjr could be placet on farm products below parity The Barkley peace proposal on the support meanwhile of enator Morris Ind Ncbr who hursday said he favored the homasHatch amendment de iitc President Roosevelts un Iterable opposition to it In addition Republican Leader iCiNary Oregon vas reported to c seeking to convince olher farm loc members they ought to SUD ort Barklcys plail because it ould mcluriP both labor and dc lands and remain there A Japanese invasion force had been wiped out at Milne bay New Guinea A Japanese drive toward Port Moresby New Guinea had bogged down for the moment anyway and the enemy supply lines back to the north coast weie taking shattering punish ment from allied planes Thc Germans were suffering frightful losses at Stalingrad and faced the possibility if not the probability of faflure in liieir entire summer offensive Submarine activity in the north Atlantic was dwindling Finally it had become plain that in thc recent German at tack on a BritishAmerican con voy in the Russian Arctic it was the Germans not Ihc convoy that took thc licking appropriate to promote th fcnsc of thc United States As for wage slablizalion Mr Roosevelt lias made it clear that ho feels he has ample authority He did not ask for additional power in Ihat field in his lo congress Pleads Innocent to Charge of Threat on Roosevelts Life WATERLOO PA pica of I rcconciledv innocent was entered Thursday by the house Louis Wachtcr 35 year old Water an amend loo war plant worker to a charge of knowingly and willfully price Norris said he was ccttinc bc luiid ihe Barklcy proposal be cause he believed it was thr only practical way of obtaining final enactment of lesislation would control both in ilustnal waprcs and farm prices If we pass this bill with Ihr amendment changing the parity bC VCtOCd under which industrial wagescan be controlled Morris told re porters 1C scnac passed thc 1 bill with the Barklcy substitute in the measure would have to be HI in which ngly wrote identical i0r tlllu vwfllu threatening to take thc life of ui to inflict great bodily harm upon anf H and Hatch v UUV4i Hell ill U thc president of the United States Arraigned before U S Com prcsi missioncr Arthur H Hykc Wach ultive lieutenants left no doubt as to thc fate of the lat if it Senator B r o H reached the wn DMich cs lhat it would xprnsscd doubt would pass il veto Hc also   

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