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Mason City Globe Gazette: Wednesday, September 23, 1942 - Page 1

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - September 23, 1942, Mason City, Iowa                             OEPARTMCNT OF HISTORY ANO 6 CCJP NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME THE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS VOL XLVIII ASSOCIATED PRESS AND UNITED PFIESS FULL LEASED WJMS MASON CITY IOWA WEDNESDAY THIS PAPEH CONSISTS OF TIVO SECTIONS Amnesia Victim Consents to Trial Marriage With Husband Strange to Her Ive decided to stay and give him a chance said Mrs Miller hhfS toa if she wants one declared Miller f She remembers clearly her life before that time Big Convoy Has Reached Russia LONDON great ma jorityof a big convoy of United States British and Russian mer chant ships heavily laden with war supplies for Russia has reached its destination in north Russian ports despite nazi air and sea attacks the admiralty announced Wednesday It acknowledged some losses but a communique remarked acid ly that German have sunk 38 out of 45 merchantmen more exaggerated than None of the convoying war ships was lost the admiralty bul letin added contradicting the German assertion that six vessels were damaged or sunk in Ihe run ning altack by planes and Uboats m the lengthening autumn dark ness of the Arctic No figures were issued the com munique remarking that it is not intended to assist the enemy by informing him of the extent of his lack of success Samoa Danger SAN FRANCISCO army will issue regulation fire arms to Prince Totoa Auelua 18 year old Samoan chief but he doesnt need them He showed up at a recruiting office lugging a whetstone and a two foot knife Im going to kill the Japs with it announced the chief the weapon Knife whetstone and prince were inducted Hunt Suspect in Slaying of Official Wife SPRINGFIELD 111 police Wednesday broadcast a de scription of the man Ihey want for the hatchet slaying of Charles A Nash a St Louis government at torney and his wife and as serted they had three witnesses ready lo place him at or ncar the scene of the killing From Ihe witnesses they com piled this description 27 to 28 years old weight 185 pounds height 5 feel 9 inches wearing a gray cngth coat white shirt and brown trousers light thin hair high fore head and light complexion Tjc description failed lo fit a hitchhiker from Wichita Kas who was picked up and ques tioned intensively because he had blood on his trousers and stale Police Capt Thomas L OConnor said he was holding the man only for an FBI fingerprint check Authorities were puzzled by the apparent lack of effort the killer made to conceal himself after he had left the bodies of Nash 59 and his wife Eleanor 49 in their sedan eight miles north of Sprine field early Tuesday Nash was employed by the fed eral bureau of internal revenue at St Louis Wencberg a coal miner told Stales Attorney A H Green ing that he saw the man slep from the car and start walking toward Springfield RUSSIAN BATTLE SEESAWS Farm Blocs Seek Higher Parity Prices OPPOSITION F R UNHEEDED BY COMMITTEES OPA Says 3 Billion Would Be Added to Overall Living Costs WASHINGTON house farm block formally joined its sen ate counterpart Wednesday in a drive to write into the untiinfla tibn bill higher agricultural parity prices despite unalterable ad ministration opposition Representing the house farm group Hep Brown D Ga pro posed to insert in the measure an amendment reading Parity prices and compar able prices for any agricultural commodity shall be determined as authorized by existing law but shall also include all farm labor In connection with the admin istration efforts to defeat the pro posal to increase parity prices the office of price administration said t would add 53000000000 to 500000000 annually to the over all cost of living A redefinition of parity was proposed in the original house antiinflation bill offered by Rep Steagall of Alabama chairman of WASHINGTON istration Leader Barkley D Ky asked the senate Wednes day afternoon to postpone fur ther consideration of the anti inflation bill until Thursday while an effort was made to compose differences arising over an amendment proposed by the farmbloc he house banking committee but vas stricken out by the commit ee before the legislation was re ported to the floor On the senate side Republican Leader McNary Oregon an lounced he would support efforts o write higher farm parity prices nto the administrations antiin lation bill At the same time Democratic Leader Barkley Kentucky told reporters that the vote on this proposal to lift price ceilings on farm products under the legis lation despite the vigorous op position of President Roosevelt was likely to be extremely close in the senate Farm Labor Problem Cited by Wickard WASHINGTON of Agriculture Wickard said Wed nesday that unless we find some way to deal with the farm labor problem and other problems of farm production satisfactorily we must find some way in the not loo dislant future to deal with a shortage of food Testifying before the house ag riculture committee about a grow ing farm labor shortage which he said cannot be overlooked or nored Wickard suggested thai a national labor service act should be given consideration It is not simply a question af Jecting agriculture Wickard said It is a question which affects an entire war effort While 1942 food production has reached a record high he told the committee beginning an lion of the whole farm problem the future is much darker since much labor for the 1942 crop was performed before the United States entered the war begin on the 1943 crop with a labor situation far more threat ening than a yearago and every sign points to our losing more and more men the secretary testified The committees decision to bring into the open a labor situa tion which some members said would result soon in an acute food shortage unless settled came amid indications of increasing support for national service legislation Fulmer said private inquiries by committee members had disclosed tttat selective service officials were becoming alarmed about the farm situation Representative Flannagan D Va who headed an agriculture subcommittee that recently studied the farm labor problem said he was ready to support a general manpower draft if the current hearings showed a need for it Flannagan said he had noticed a tendency in the past to provide First for the needs of industry and he armed forces without reckon ing on the result of agriculture British Take Capital City on Madagascar The outcome may depend on he decision several senators vho have not yet made known heir position Barkley said just Before the senate opened its third iay of debate and the house its ccond on a measure authorizing resident Roosevelt lo stabilize irices wages and salaries at Scp ember 15 levels so far as urac ical The amendment to the adminis ralion bill submitted by Senators homas D Okla and Hatch D V would make it manda ory for the government lo include he cost of all farm labor in com uting parity prices Under the ending legislation no price ccil ngs could be placed on farm pro ucls below 100 per cent on par By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS British troops were reported to have captured the capital city of Tananarive on Madagascar island Wednesday after breaking through artillerysupported Vichy French troops drawn up for a major stand 15 miles outside the city A Tananarive radio broadcast heard at Port Louis Mauritius conceded that the British had oc cupied the inland capital Earlier a British army com munique said British forces over came stiffening resistance by the French 15 miles north of Tananarive Other British columns advanc ing on Tananarive from the east coast of the 1000 mile long is land which lies off southeast Africa were reported making good progress In the southwest Pacific battle theater American and allied planes were officially crediled with battering four key Japanese bases in the New Guinea zone and damaging an enemy cruiser north west of Guadalcanal in the lower Solomon islands A navy communique in Wash ington said navy and marine dive bombers hit the cruiser in an at tack Sunday Imperial Tokio headquarters asserted that a Japanese subma rine had seriously damaged a U S cruiser of the 9050ton North ampton type off the Aleutian islands Aug 31 but there was no confirmation of this claim else where Tokio further claimed that Jap anese destroyerssink two U S submarines in the same waters during midSeptember A communique from Gen Doug las MacArthurs headquarters said allied flyers carrying out one of ihc most extensive sweeps since the start of the New Guinea campaign poured more than 34000 rounds of cannon and ma chinegun fire inlo Japanese sup ply bases troop concentrations airdromes and shipping The raiders slruck al Buna and Kokocla in New Guinea Bukn on Ihe northern tip of the Salamons and Rabaul New Britain If At First LAMBERTVILLE N J if in 1917 a Lambertville man took an examination for a hcense to drive a car He failed but he wasnt discouraged The state motor vehicle bureau says the same man has just taken out another learners his 225th in 25 years Continue Trial of Men Held for Assault on Des Moines Man CHICAGO IV The habeas corpus hearing for three men sought by DCS Monies Iowa au thorities in connection with an as sault there July 23 on Mose Cohen Des Moines bookmaker Tuesday was continued until Oct G after states witnesses had com pleted their testimony The accused men arc Frank Fratto 27 John Wolck 38 and Philip J Mesi 33 They arc at liberty under bonds of each SUGAR PLANT TO START TUESDAY Opening of Campaign Delayed Because of Ram Says Finley The starling dale of the fall campaign of the American Crystal Sugar company plant here has been postponed from Saturday Sept 2Q to Tuesday Sept 23 it was announced Wednesday by A R Finley superintendent Rainfall has delayed the har vesting of the beet crop making the postponement necessary Mr Finley stated One of the longest runs in the plant history is being expected it was stated Reveal Allied Raid on Axis Egypt Lines CAIRO BritiVi desert patrol raids 500 miles be hind the axis Egyptian line on three vital enemy big supply port of Bengasi the near by coastal air base site of Barce and the putpost garrison at the Gialo oasis deep in the desert were disclosed by the British command Wednesday Announcement of the most spectacular largescale land raid ing in the whole war on the Medi terranean front in which British said heavy blows were dealt enemy forces supplies and planes came only after the Ital ians Tuesday had acknowledged a sixday battle at the Gialo oasis The disclosure of these rapicl firc land patrol operations showed that even the landscaair raid on Tobruk the night uf Sept 13 was only one phase of a series of sweeping incursions into enemy territory far west of the E Alc mcin line With United States and British air forces heavily bombing both Bengasi and Tobruk in diversion attacks the desert raiders struck Bengasi on he same night Sept 13 that other forces were landed at Tobvuk Although they began 10 davs ago the BcngasiBarce raids were i tightly held secret until now The combined land sea and air stabs at two Libyan ports Ben gasi and Tobruk used by the axis to gel supplies across the Medi terranean were said by one in formed source to have compli cated the enemys supply diffi culties Although there was no official commentbeyond thecommunique British sources regarded it as likely that all the British forces went overland to and from their BengasiBarcc objectives with no participation by seaborne troops Gialo a remote outpost about 235 miles clue south of Bengasi and 500 miles southwest of El AlnmctnQattara battle line in Egypt was attacked on the night of Sept 15 Buy War Savings Bonds and j Stamps friim your GloucGazcltc carrier boy Lions Honor International President at Lake HKADS DEVTISTS SIOUX CITY North west Iowa Dental society in con vention here elected Dr A J Tan ner of Cherokee as its president Weather Report FORECAST MASON CITY Showers Wednes day afternoon and early Wed nesday night Fresh to strong winds Wednesday afternoon and early Wednesday night Much cooler Wednesday night and Thursday forenoon Tempera ture near freezing Thursday morning IOWA Showers Wednesday and cast portion early Wednesday night cooler west and north this afternoon colder Wednes day night near freezing north west and north central Wednes day night fresh and strong winds Wednesdas IN MASON CITY Maximum Tuesday 57 Minimum Tuesday 3s At 8 a m Wednesday 45 Precipitation 59 YEAR AGO Maximum sn Minimum 47 To honor their international president Edward H Paine of Michigan City Ind more than 230 Lions and Lion ladies from all sections of North more on the west to Manchester on the at the Clear Lake North Shore Country club Tuesday night for an evening of food singing oratory stunts and dancing Clear Lake and Mason City were the host clubs For nearly an hour President ainc a man of giant physique resonant voice and glib tongue held his audience spellbound as with story and parable drawn from his various world travels he pictured the program of Lion ism in a wartorn world Lawrence Bless president of the Clear Lake club presided The ad dress of welcome was by Mayor A B Phillips Ed Boyle deal Lake lawyer served as master ol ceremonies Roy L Bailey district governor presented the distin guished guests including past governors district deputies and zone chairmen The speaker was introduced by W A Wcstfall himself a past international Lions president The singing during the dinner was in charge of Lawrence Bless Earl Dean and Earl Hall with Mrs Burdctte Bailey and Jack Shumate at the piano Dinner music provided by a high school orchestra under lie di rection of John Kopccky Rudy Frisch Garner tailtwister saw that there were no dull moments throughout the evening President Paine opened his talk by recalling the start of the pres ent war when he was a visitor in London Overnight with the declaration of a state of war against Hitler Mr Paine observed a tremendous change came over the British people who for months had hoped against hope that they could somehow avoid war Now we can have at him they said as they began digging in for the fight It was during a bomb raid alarm the Hoosicr speaker re called while he was huddled in a hotel basement with a number of Britishers that it dawned on him for the first lime the war just starting would be no re specter of nation or nationality Even though he was an American n UwilVP VC is other than he faced the same dangers as the British about him Mr Paine described his tedious voyage back home on a slowmov ing and overcrowded freighter then launched inlo a discussion of the considerations at stake in this war Hitlers philosophy as set forth in Mein Kampf divides into two parts he asserted First that no nation is entitled to survive which cannot protect itself against an aggressor second that the Get man people are destined not only to rule but to enslave the re mainder of the world In bringing out the brulality of iA r n the first of these two President Paine made conccpls dramatic ac allusion to Norway and its brave fight to carve out a peaceful des tiny for itself in surroundings which make for a rugged race And yet the speaker added Norway is one of the nations which under the Hitler philosophy is not entitled to a place in the sun Briefly outlining the American struggle for the liberty her people now enjoy Ihe Indiana man pre dicted that no sacrifice would be too great lo bring the axis enemies to their knees in this war The Lion ideal of unselfish service was developed by the in ternational president through a parable called A Basket of ivmch had its setting near Tiberius on the Sea of Galilee It had lo do with a venerable man who planted a fig tree for Mis own lifetime and an abundant reward in gold from Hadrian a Roman emperor Among those rating special in troductions as distinguished guests were past International Director C F Starr of Mason City past Dist Govs C F Weaver Mason City and Ira Jones Clear Lake Deputy Govs Robert Watson Manchester and Dr C B Haydcn Forest City Secretary C ason City Zone Chairmen L L Bless Clear Lake and Lcroy Klein peter Wesley Karl Ganotte of wintersei field representative Delegations were present from Livermorc Wesley Garner For Dist 9A Cabinet E Gilman Mason r M lived to see it bear fruit within i all in Iowa carrfc boT REDS YIELD IN SOME SECTORS GAIN IN OTHERS Invaders Pay With 6000 Men for Gains Measured in Yards By HENRY C CASSIDV MOSCOW terrific coordinated attack of massed lanks and waves of dive bombers the Russians yielded several more streets in one section of Stalin grad Wednesday but beal off the Germans in handlohand bailies elsewhere in the eily where Ihc invaders were said to have paid a toll of nlmost 6000 men in three days for gains measured in yards Baltlefront dispatches said red army forces which crossed the surging Volga under cover of darkness fell upon one flank of the German penetration of the devastated city and drove them from their positions An important road was reported recaptured in housetohouse fighting in an other sector while southwest of the city the Russians were said lo have retaken a village Iravda said the sky over Ihc city was a cloudflecked battle field with tie nazis making morn than 1000 bombing flights in a single day asainst rein forced soviet fighter plane dcx fcuses Tanks brought up to bolster Hitlers desperate bid for a Sep tember victory on the Volga were declared hurled at the defenders of the city of Stalin in massed hundreds In a single sector attacking in fantrymen were reported led by more than 100 the greatest armored shock force over used in street fighting n was the 30th day of the siege Recounting1 the price the nails paid for tlieir limited gains the Russian midday communique said more than 1000 Germans were killed ii fierce fifflifinjr northwest of the city 400 more in the northern part of Slalin srad and Iwo companies of per haps 300 men wiped out else where in the cily area by Rus sian lanks The midnight communique aid more than 3000 Germans had been killed or wounded in Ihe preceding two days northwest of the city alone with 300 slain in another single salient and a bat lalion of nboul 000 men wiped out south of the city The army newspaper Red Star said street booths and even over turned automobiles were used as firing points Hard fighting for street interseclions developed with the Germans in some cases firing from buildings on one cor ner while red army men blasted awry from the opposite side of the slrccl Soviet attacks northwest of Ihc city assumed considerable strength and the Germans were declared slowly forced back Red Star said the invaders had been hurled from a number of positions in that stra tegic area The army publication reported the Russians had recaptured a village soulhwcsl of Stalingrad Jn a battle for an important height it said the Germans lost lanks and several Ihousands Iroops in two days Russias army of the central Caucasus fought on against Ger man tanks and automatic rifle men in the Mozdok area Soviet artillery on the Lenin grad front was credited with the destruction of 19 nazi blockhouses 10 dugouts and two field guns dur ing the past three days Russian troops who recently seized Ihc initiative in the Sima vino sector of the Volkhov front nortnwcst of Moscow were cred ited with beating off a powerful ijcrrnan counteraltack On this sector of ihc front the communique said soviet au ri1mvann gunners shot down 10 German planes Traffic Jam ENGLEWOOD J hce received an urgent call Tues day lo untangle a Iraffic jam at a mam intersection They found four year old Donald Waldman ricimg m his toy automobile with drivers hemmins him in on four sides and beseeching him lo move on Donald said he wanted lo how his car would ride on a real Buy War Savings Bonds and   

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