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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: September 21, 1942 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - September 21, 1942, Mason City, Iowa                             i r c i r Of NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME THE NEWSPAPER THAT VOL XLVIH ASSOCIATED PRESS AND UNITED PRESS FUU LEASED WIRES FIVE CENTS A TTinio MASON CITY IOWA MONDAY SEPTEMBER 21 1942 MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS THIS PAPEK CONSISTS OP TWO SECTIONS SECTION ONE Three Easy Lessons on How to Wreck a Bridge out the i a cateipillar tlactoilias to clgeoff cut loose from ts moorings and has pulled one end of the a i0l the C013lmitteeThe man in thc tenter is using shown fn t0 SSize trMtor to Lock photo Kayenav en graving pictures were taken Sun day at a bridge across the Win ncbago river miles north west of Wheelerwood The bridge was wrecked by workmen from thc county road crews who did thc work without pay to help the salvage drive designed to Keep the nations smelters busy producing steel to win the war To criticism of working on Sunday the answer was There were no Sundays on Bataan Besides its the only day we have to give The 17 men who did the work used the countys equipment with the approval of the board of supervisors The bridge was on an abandoned road and the planks were rotted so that they would no longer support a mans weight indicating how long the bridge had stood unused C M Kendrcw foreman head ed a Alason City crew including Frank Burrcll Pete Jensen Ro land Edgar Ernest Allen Jiam Edgar Joe Patton Art Loyd Pederscn Don Klunder and Lyle Pickford Art Thomas was foreman of the Rockwell crew including Martin Trcston Carl Roggeman Hudolph Kopiter Henry Miller and Verne Hathaway Canadian Destroyer Sunk 112 Reported Missing Thought Dead OTTAWA Canadian destroyer Ottawa has been torpe doed and sunk with her com mander four other officers and missing and believed killed navy minister Angus Mac Donald announced Monday Watchman Marooned in Stalled Elevator NEW YORK JFThe loneliest man in town over the weekend was not a soldier or was Warren Snyder a watchman Snyder was marooned alone in a stalled elevator 15 floors up in a skyscraper overlooking 42nd street from 7 p m Saturday until a m Sunday When his relief came onr Snyder was still yelling fljr help B Bombers Blast Japs on Lae Base for 3rd Day Straight r Nipponese Forces Are Stalled in New Guinea Milne Bay Mopped Up GENERAL MacARTHURS HEADQUABTERS Australia without interference from enemy planes allied fighters Sunday attacked the vital Japa nese base at Lac on the northeast coast of New Guinea for the third successive day burning five barges and a tugboat and damag ing shore installations A communique announcing the raid said allied fighters and bombers also had blasted Japa nese supply lines extending in land from Buna 175 miles be low Lac to Kokoda on the route of the Japanese drive toward Tort Moresby f Thc assault on Buna which touched off fires and heavy explo sions was the thirteenth on that target since Aug 25 STALL JAPS IN DRIVE AGAINST PORT MORESBY On the New Guinea ground front allied headquarters reported No change in the general situa tion indicating the Japanese still were stalled at loribaiwa a ham let on the southern slopes of the Owen Startley mountains 32 miles airline from Port Moresby which they reached early last week Extensive patrol activity was reported in that sector however and a resumption of bitter fight ing at any time was regarded as likely MOPPING UP COMPLETED IN MILNE BAY AREA An allied spokesman mean while announced elimination of another threat to Port Moresby with the completion of mopping up operations in the Milne Bay area on the southeast tip of New Guinea where the Japanese set troops ashore during the last week in July All the enemy forces engaged In that abortive thrust have been disposed of the spokesman declared The sweeping air assaults car ried out by the allied air force Sunday represented the continua tion of a coordinated program to smash the bases througii which thc Japanese are supplying their troops trying to push overland to ward Port Moresby Eight tons of bombs were un loaded in the previous days at tack on carried out without enemy fighter opposition Solomons Ready for Jap Attack WASHINGTON bat tle of the Solomon Istands Mon day was believed approaching the crucial stage Reinforced American occupa tion forces are prepared for an expected attack by the most for midable Japanese elements yet thrown into the struggle A powerful enemy naval task force which fled from thc vi cinity of thc Solomons after being attacked just a week ago by army Flying Fortresses probably is readying for anoth er attempt to invade the Amer icandominated it is not already steaming toward them The big American bombers re ported possible hits on two bat tleships but did not stay long enough to confirm this because of the tremendous antiaircraft barrage thrown up by the enemy British 37 Miles From Tananarive Madagascar Capital LONDON Madagascar radio said Monday that British forces now are within 37 miles of Tananarive thc island capital The broadcast was heard at Port Louis on Mauritius island The British column was said to be advancing from Majunga northwest the capital NO 297 Hits Hayrack Girl Dies BLUEGRAS Minn neral services will be held for Anna Rose Daugherly 17 died in a Wadena Minn hospital of injuries received when an automobile in which she was riding struck a hayrack BOMBARD STALINGRAD Report Tirpitz Out on Patrol BATTLESHIP IS CLAIMED TO BE IN ARCTIC SEAS Huge Craft Had Been in Refuge in Norwegian Port of Trondheim LONDON German su perbattleship Tirpitz was re ported Monday to have left her refuge in the Norwegian port of TrondheJm and to be patrolling Arctic sea lanes undeithe cover 6t nazi warplanes in search of al lied convoys V The report was he firsC inti mation of activity by the great warship since last July 9 when the Russians announced that one of their submarines had scored two torpedo hits on her in Arctic waters thus foiling a nazi attempt to smash a big al lied convoy V The Tirpitz was said to have holed up in Trondhcirn fjord after this attack hiding there during the long summcv days when her movements could easily have been checked by aircraft had she ven tured forth With the longer nights of au tumn however the battleship would have a better chance of slipping undetected along the Nor wegian coast and thence into the Arctic shipping lanes leading to Russia Observers here said that the Ger mans obviously were calling upon every means at theirdisprsal in an attempt to smash allied convoys taking vita war materials to em battled Russia Only Sunday the German high command reported that nail planes and submarines had sunk 38 merchantmen in a sixday running battle with a 45ship convoy in the Arctic While the German claims were characterized here as exaggerated unofficial sources believed that losses on the Rusian supply route undoubtedly have been heavy Thus tar the might iest most costly unit in the Ger man played an entirely negative part in the war Much of the time she has spent in hiding from assaults by allied bombers arid submarines The Tirpite was launched at on April 1 1939 She has been listed officially as a 35000ton ship but the British say she probably is 40000 tons or more REPORTS HEARD BREAK FOB SEA FAILED LONDON UR Unconfirmed reports said Monday that Ger manys great battleship Tirpitz had failed jn an attempt to break out to sea from Norway to attack an allied convoy and may have been torpedoed Hardly had the Tirpitz got info the high seas it was said before British forces were there prepared to block it Escort vessels warned the Tir piU ot its danger according to the reports and it made at full steam back into Trondheim fjord where it is protected by heavy coastal guns and mountain walls which make bombing difficult According to the reports a Brit ish submarine was believed to have Closed to effective attack range before the German battle ship escaped Stimson 75 Works Vigorously at Duties WASHINGTON L Stimson reached 75 Monday and associates said he appeared to be carrying his wartime responsi bilities with as much vigor as when he became secretary of war more than two years ago when the country was at peace The eldest member of President Roose velts cabinet planned to take note of the anniversary only by read ing congratulatory messages at his desk in the munitions building Man Who Lived in Cave Dies After Home Falls MENDOTA Minn Murphy 63 died Sunday because the roof of his house fell in on him Murphy who for eight years lived in a cave alongside nearby railroad track was seriously in jured last week when part of his home collapsed on him Taken to the adjoining cave of a friend Jan Austin Murphy died Legion Asks Draft Age Be Lowered to 18 Conscription of Manpower Is Advocated Roaiie Waring Elected National Commander at Kansas City Convention KANSAS CITY Iff The American Legion asked congress Monday to lower the draft age to 18 years and to conscript man power for war production By an overwhelming standing vote the Legionnaires at the dost barring government ing session of their three day f lpJoymeU Conscientious ob streamlmed convention passed 1he resolution offered by the na tional defense committee headed by Warren H Stockton Cal In conjunction with the re quest that the draft age be low ered the Legion urged congress to pass legislation calling for compulsory military training after the war in which every youth would lie required to have at least one year of training before he reaches the age of 22 A demand also was voiced for a navy large enough to meet any contingency that might arise in a world at war T iir inuui uuu3 enuangor tue Hoane Waring of Memphis was financing of several legion pro elected national commander by an grams including work unanimous vote after delegates crippled children from every state had stormed on to the stage with their in his behalf Supplementing its appeal for a national service at conscripting manpower for war production the Legion reiterated a demand for its long sponsored universal service act calling ror the drafting ofall resources of the nation including capital labor industry and agri culture as well as the fighting manpower The action was taken on the floor of the national convention after it had been proposed in a resolution offered by the employ ment committee headed by Law rence J Penlon of Illinois National Commander Lynn TJ Stambaugh presented the Le gions distinguished service medal to Gen Douglas MacAr thur through Maj Gen James A Ulio the adjutant general of the army Ulio in accepting the medal for MatArthur spoke over a short wave radio broadcast to Australia If General MacArthur were here today Ulio said am sure that he would accept it first in the name of those who have fallen in battle with him Perhaps he would remind you that no possible circumstance must for one moment delay the flow of arms ships and planes to place in the hands of his command the implements ot victory In accepting this distinguished service medal of the American Legion on behalf of General Mac Arthur may I say to you in his all the strength and courage which have made and preserved America carry on f f Loud cheering went up from the1500 delegates at the con vention as Slambaugh broad cast greetings to the fighting men of World war II from the fighting men from World Avar I Lieut Col Ian Fraser of Great Britain brought greetings from General Sir Frederick Maurice president of the British Legion to the convention He said the common task of Lc Sions in both countries is to main tain allied unity in the war and in the peace and to awaken a fuller sense of responsibility and urgency in the civilian mind In addition to calling for en actment of a national service law the Legionnaires also asked for legislation that would sive the same job security o enlisted men and women in the armed forces upon their return as is now provided those drafted under the selective service act Reestablishment of civilian conservation corps camps for vet erans of both World wars was asked of congress by the organi zation which also appropriated S2o000 for its national employ ment committee to make a study of postwar labor problems Sunday the Legion voted to ask congress to amend its charter so that veterans of the present war could be admitted to membership The action came by a resolution of several approved by the conventions 1500 delegates One of them reaffirmed the Legions stand against strikes and dis crimination in employment at war production plants Civilian control of Japanese in ternment camps was criticized and theLegionnaires went on record opposing any special privileges for the Japanese under anv pre text They pledged complete support to the president in prosecution of the war condemned persons re fusing to bear arms for the na tion and petitioned congress for jectors The question of a 1943 conven tion was left for the executive committee to decide Approval by congress of tie proposal to amend the Legions charter to take in the new vet erans is regarded as merely a technicality The Legion also authorized its womans auxil iary to take similar action for feminine relatives of veterans of the war The legion refused to suspend dues to its 100000 members serv ing in the armed forces R L Gor don of Arkansas finance chair man said suspension of the 51 annual dues would endanger the It was the only measure that went to n roll call All the rest ot them were passed by over whelming voice votes The legionnaires heard Wil liam Green president of the American Federation of Labor sajr Sunday that any worker whostops work fpr a single minute is Tailing to carry out the principles of tile American Federation of Labor Saying it was conceivable that the nation will lose two to three million men in the war Lieut Ben Lear of Memphis com mandant of the second army in that followed no easy way Greens remains a speech asserted for us He said that incompetents among the army command must be weeded out and assailed ci vilians looking for a short cut to an officers commission He expressed approval of the officers training schools saying they were developing capable leaders 2 Killed 18 Hurt in Flying School Blast GOLEM AN Tex per sons were killed and 18 others in jured Monday in an explosion which demolished the administra tion building of the Coleman fly ing school The dead were George Kneit Austin Tex office mana ger for the Odom Construction company and Mrs Arch Yarbro about 25 office manager for the civilian operator of the school Weather Report FORECAST MASON Monday afternoon and Monday night Light scattered showers Tues day forenoon Fresh winds Mon day afternoon IOWA Scattered light showers and somewhat warmer Monday afternoon and evening cooler late Monday night and Tuesday forenoon MINNESOTA Scattered showers Monday afternoon and extreme east portions cooler Monday night and Tuesday forenoon with moderately strong winds south portion strong winds north por tion Monday afternoon and Monday night IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics Maximum Sunday 67 Minimum Sunday night 42 At 8 a m Monday 48 YEAR AGO Maximum Minimum Rfi 67 North Iowa thermometers hit tne seasons low Sunday morning with a 34 registered at the Globc GazetteKGLO weather station in Mason City Frost was very much in evidence until a bright sun whisked it away in the early fore noon Little or no damage was re ported Maximum Saturday 59 Minimum Saturday night 34 At 8 a m Sunday 34 YEAR AGO Maximum j2 Minimum gj living Costs May Go Up 5 Per Cent Despite Brakes WASHINGTON Wi Senator Brown p Mich told the senate Monday ii opening debate on the antiinflation bill that thc cost of living might go up 5 per cent in the next year even though the most effective brakes possible were applied This objective is not possible of full accomplishment Brown said in view of the nations pentup purchasing power This objective is not possible ot full accomplishment Brown said in view of thc nations pentup purchasing power Brown is coauthor of the sen ate bill Farm prices may have to be permitted to go 1 step higher he declared adding there is no doubt farmlabor costs will re quire some readjustment of prices Hex said neither congressional sponsors of the bill nor adminis trative officials were satisfied they could stabilize prices abso lutely al their present level But from 3 to 5 above the present level should be the limit at which prices could be per mitted to rise Thc unprecedented bill went to thc senate along with a cini mittec report that food prices had been climbing at thc rate of 40 per cent a year since last sprine f Senator Nor r is IndNcbr suggested a provision that no utility rates shall be increased without the consent of the presi dent Brown said thc banking committee had felt ihat public utility rates were controlled at present by various federal and state commissions but Norns sug gestion was acceptable if it was needed to cover certain cases and to state thc policy of congress Lending further urgency to thc measure authorizing presidential control of thc cost of living were these other findings by thc senate banking committee Prices received by farmers had risen 85 per cent from August 1939 to August 1042 while the prices paid by the farmers had increased 22 per cent in the same period Since 1939 hourly wage rates in all manufacturing industries had advanced about 30 per cent and that the aggregate of wages and salaries paid out had risen 71 per cent From Jan 1 1941 to May 1942 unit labor costs had increased at the average of 11 per cent per month Unit labor costs will unques tionably increase still further even apart from increases in wage rates as a consequence of the loss of skilled workers introduction of less skilled labor and inevitable transportation and other delays Control of wages and salaries must proceed simultaneously with control of food cost Senator Thomas DOkla said n senate agricultural subcommit tee would submit thc following amendment to the bill to the full agricultural committee Tuesday Parity prices are comparable prices for any agricultural com modities and shall be determined as authorized by existing law but also shall include all farm labor Thomas estimated that rule if applied would make the ceiling prices of farm products approxi mately 112 per cent of parity as based on the index figures for the period J9001H14 President Roosevelt is on record as unalterably opposed to any change in the present method of computing parity Thomas said thc amendment was proposed by theAmerican Farm Bureau Federation the National Grange the Council of Farm Co operatives and others Report 5000 French Citizens Arrested by Nazis Over Weekend ON THE FRENCH FRONTIER from France Mon day night said that 5000 French citizens were arrested by the nazis in Paris over thc weekend The arrests were made either on sus picion of participation in the at tack on a movie theater in which one nazi soldier was killed and 30 wounded or for violation of thc strict weekend curfew imposed by thc nazis CITY SHAKEN BY HEAVY SHELLS BUT FIGHTS ON Soviet Defenders Hold With Nazis Too Busy to Remove Badly Wounded MOSCOW in their efforts to take Stalingrad by storm the Germans began a mighty bombardment with heavy longrange guns that shook the city from end to end Monday but still thc soviet defenders held and even gained ground at some points in handtohand street fighting the Russians announced Shells screaming into the city lore gaping craters in streets and squares and the thunder of the cannonading all butdrowned out thc clatter of machinecuns rifles and mortars manned by opposing forces locked in close quarter fiRhtiiisr in the suburbs Pravda reported in a Stalingrad dispatch V The bloody struggle increased in ferocity by the hour and Prav da said German dead were piling high in thc streets with the fran tic nazis not even taking time to remove their seriously wounded from thc battlefield In the northwestern suburbs lo cale of the heaviest fighting the Russians and Germans were fight ing it out house by house the soviet forces putting up thc same valiant resistance that saved Mos cow and Leningrad But despite frightful losses in dead the Germans hurled new di visions of tanks armored cars and infantry and swarms ot planes into the battle Tn the haze of smoke from flaming buildings and bursting shells and bombs the Germans times able to advance Pravda reported but only a matter of yards and at a fright ful price in blood The countryside around Stalin grad was littered with piles ot scrap metal which once were Ger man tanks trucks and cannon the newspaper said On other fronts soviet dis patches sketched this situation MoziJok in deep Caucasus The Russians repelled several attacks and look some prisoners On the Black sea coast southeast of Novorossisk The nazis made no progress against the Russians holding tlic shore road and skirt ting heights to thc Caucasus val ley where the Soviets greatest oil and refineries arc lo cated North and south Voronezh Thc Russians continued to attack fur iously slaying 3000 Germans in three days 950 of them in one battle The Germans attacked six times in one place and lailed to advance On thc Volkhov front southeast of Leningrad The Russians broke into a heavily fortified forest in the Sinyavino district after an at tack from the south and north west in which they blew up an ammunition dump and captured prisoners and trophies A Stalingrad the Russians were battlinff for the 28th dav ajraiml German masses which had breached thc northwestern ramparts several days ago They even recaptured some nf the lost streets according to ad vices to Moscow but the Ger mans were moving in new re serves and were making some slight progress elsewhere yard by yard While the Germans were thus seeking to widen their penetration in the city they still were checked in the valleys and ravines on the approaches to the city in other sectors dispatches said The midday communique said only that in the Stalingrad area fierce fighting continued Our units annihilated about two regi ments of German infantry de stroyed eleven tanks and 89 trucks and silenced two artillery and eight mortar batteries The Russians also threw back German attacks in the Mozdok region of the Caucasus and south east of the German occupied port of Novorossisk on thc Black Sea the communique said Thc battle for Stalingrad civ In fury as German tanks rumbled up to the city and dive bombers clouded the sky in an effort to blast a way through the brick and stones Thc Rus sians admitted thc irallant de fense had reached a critical In a burst of pride Izvestia said that thc Hitlerites arc forced to recognize that never before hav   

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