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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: September 14, 1942 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - September 14, 1942, Mason City, Iowa                             CGMP NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME THE NEWSPAPER THAT MASON CITY IOWA MONDAY SEPTEMBER 14 1942 MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS THIS PAPER CONSISTS OF TWO SECTIONS SECTION ONE Historic North Iowa Start Journey to Battle Axis The huge gun barrel hanging from the chains was one on which the electromagnet above it wouldnt workIts li C a11 brought a check for to Wmnebago county after being hauled from the courthouse grounds at Forest City to a local junk yard Harry Walt local dealer in scrap metals shown in the picture pointed out an inscription on the cannon Funcli cionde Avtilleria Seville 1869 N 9981 The old cast iron cannon iust below its muzzle is older however Bearing a crown insignia it is inscribed with the date 1798 It and the 5 millimeter barrel just beyond it came from Osage Just below the brass cannon can be seen the barrel and carnage of a gun made by the German Friedrich Krupp works in 1918 accordingto its inscription Its 4600 pounds of steel are going back to Germany with the compliments ot the thousands of Americans who are taking an active part in the nations scrap drive Lock photo Kayenav engraving J Ploesti Oil Fields Set Afire Russian Planes Also Drop Explosives on BucharestKoenigsberg MOSCOW Rumanian field center o Ploesti was left flames as aresult of a bombing Sunday night by Russian Iplancs the Moscow radio reported I Bucharest capital of Rumania fcnd Koenigsberg in east Prussia also were said to have been red lir raiders targets Thirtythree fires accompanied gby heavy explosions broke out in B Bucharest the announcement said J Five blasts were observed in the Ijvicinity of a military barracks ar Wsenal and the Rumanian war min listry J Six large fires were reported J started in Ploesti Other Rumanian named in the were I said to have been bombed I All but one soviet bomber re 1 turned to its base the radio said BREMEN GLOW SEEN FOU 100 MILES AWAY LONDON and Rus sian bombers delivering a new twin blow to the flanks of the axis 1000 miles apart smashed at the northwest German port of Bremen Monday night in a RAF attack probably hundreds of planes i strong and raided Bucharest and I the Ploesti oil region of Rumania m irom bases deep in Russia Lone Hying British bombers were back over northwestern Ger many again at dawn in followup attacks the air ministry reported announcing a total loss of 19 Brit ish bombers The air ministry said the 100th attack of the war onVBrcmen was delivered by strong force a phrase which was taken here to Jndicafe that bombers by the hun dreds were used Returning pilots reported vis ibility through riffs in the light clouds was good and said they un loaded their tons of explosives over the Weser river port by the light of raging fires whose red glow they could see for 100 miles on their flight back to base Kills Himself and Former Sweetheart SUN PRAIRIE Wis UPJAn ger over his former sweethearts association with other boys caused Howard Hermanson 21 to shoot Gerta Marie Johnson 17 and then shoot himself early Sat urday the youth told District At torney Norris E Maloney Her manson ordered to report at Mil waukee Friday for army induc tion arrived at Miss Johnsons home Friday night just as she re turned from a date i HEAVYRAFRAIDMust Strip Civilian Economy STRIKES VictoryF R Little More Than Little More Than Half Way Mark in War Output Now Reached WASHINGTON Roosevelt reporting that the value lendiease deliveries in the last months was Monday warned that only by stripping our civilian economy to the bone can maximum produc t i o n and certain victory be reached So far the United States has little more than passed the half way mark towards maximum possible war production he said in transmitting the sixth quarterly report to congress on lendlease operations Not until we have reached the can do this only by stripping our civilian economy to the our fighters and those of our allies be assured of the vastly greater quantities of weapons required to turn the tide Not until then can the united nations march forward together to certain Deliveries of lendlease sup plies which have been growing he said will have to grow much larger still He said Great Britain which has been fighting the nazis for three years China in her sixth year of war and Russia where is located the wars greatest land front from the beginning have carried on without enough guns or tanks or planes It is through their uphill fight that the war has not been lost he said Only by strength ening our allies and combining their strength with ours can we surely win We and the other united na tions need all the weapons that all of us can produce and that all of vis can muster In relation to their available resources Britain and Russia have up o now pro duced more weapons than we have And they arc continuing to produce to Ihe limit in spite of the fact that Russia is a battle ground and Britain an offensive base7 The report was for the 18 monlhs period from March 1941 through August 1942 It showed a steadily increasing volume ot aid to the allied nations but reflected the increasing demands of Americas armed forces The report did not give a monthbymonth breakdown of the amount of lendlease aid but a chart showed that goods trans ferred and services rendered dropped from approximately 5600000000 in July to about mid way between 5500000000 and 5600000000 in August American factories and workshops arc furnishing Our forces with the weapons and materials they must have the report said At the same time under the lendlease program weapons must be provided in steadily increasing quantities to our allies so that the fighting forces of the united nations may become an overwhelming force The report said aid was being provided lendlease nations at a rate of approximately 58000000 000 annually the same rate of spending reported in the previous quarterly report Of the 55129000000 total for goods transferred and services rendered goods transferred rep resented 79 per cent and services rendered 21 per cent The value of lendlease goods in process at the end of August was 51360000 000 Thus the totalamount of lend lease aid to the end of August was 56489000000 compared with a total of at the end of the previous quarter in June In August lendlease goods ac tually transferred from this coun try to fighting allies consisted primarily of military 58 per about 29 per cent in industrial materials and 13 per cent in foodstuffs Of the goods transferred ap proximately 90 per cent havebeen shipped and the remainder are at docks and warehouses awaiting export Weather Report FORECAST MASON CITY Warmer Monday afternoon continued warm Monday night and Tuesday fore noon much change in temperature Monday night and Tuesday forenoon scattered thundershowers east portion Monday night and extreme cast portion Tuesday forenoon Monday j night and Tuesday forenoon I not much change in tempera turc IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics Maximum Sunday 70 Minimum Sunday night 60 At 8 a m Monday 64 Rain 05 inch YEAR AGO CRASH KILLS IOWAN Waverly Lieutenant and 6 Others Are Victims At Columbia S Car COLUMBIA S Car ond Lieut Francis W Sparks 27 son of Dr and Mrs Francis R Sparks of WaverJy Iowa and six other army men were killed Sun day when the big army bombcr Sparks was piloting crashed near here The big plane plunged lo earth only a mile from the Columbia air base as it returned from a routine training flight The dead included three en listed men and three other officers besides Sparks All but one the victims were killed instantly SET MIDWEST SCORING RECORD AT CARLE1ON WAVERLY Wayne Sparks 27 year old pilot killed In the crash of his army bomber near the Columbia S Car air base set an alltime midwest con ference basketball scoring record when he captained the Carlelou college team of Northticld Minn He became an aviation cadet last December Ho earned his wings and second lieutenants commission at Victorville Cal last July 20 Lieutenant Sparks was a gradu ate of the State University of Iowa law school He was married lo Jeanne Par sons daughter of Mr and Mrs F G Parsons of Estherville Iowa Besides his widow and parents Lieutenant Sparks is survived by a sister Mrs Carl E Hageman oi Waverly Maximum 77 Minimum go Precipitation 12 The figures for Sunday Maximum Saturday 74 Minimum Saturday night 54 Al 8 a m Sunday 60 YEAR AGO Maximum 75 Minimum 55 Total Attendance at Waterloo Cattle Show Shows Drop of 20000 WATERLOO crowd of 10000 braved unfavorable weath er Sunday to attend the final day of the Dairy Cattle Congress bringing to 165000 the unofficial estimated attendance at the sev enday exposition The estimated figure indicated a drop of aboul 20000 persons from last years to Queen Alexandrine of Denmark Hurt in Fall BERLIN From German Broad Alexandrine of Denmark suffered a hip injury in a bad fall Sunday on a stairway in the royal palace in Copenhag en DNB said Monday The news agency said it was not believed that her condition was critical Queen Alexandrine is 62 Buy War Savings Bonds and Stamps from your carrier boy NO 291 12 BLASTS FAIL TO WRECK TRAIN NAZIS DECLARE CITYS DEFENSE IS PENETRATED But Russians Assert Invaders Again Checked Near Leningrad By CLYDE A FARNSWORTH Associated Press War Editor After three weeks of already frightful struggle on the immedi ate approaches to Stalingrad main theater of the world conflict the German offensiveachieved peak ferocity Monday against the elas tic Russian defense and the Ger mans claimed two penetrations of the city itself w if By Russianaccounts however the battered capital of the low er Volga region still flew her red banners of battle with the foe checked once more on the outskirts The Germans said that Stalin grad had been entered in both the southern and northwestern sec tions The southern penetration was first reported Sunday the northwestern Monday The latest German claim Monday said dom inating heights in the northwest of the city had been occupied after a bloody fight Typical of the repealed recti fications in the semicircle of de fense was the official Russian ad njfaSfton that precious ground had been yielded southwest of Stalin grad but only until strength could be marshaled to stop and then blunt the new penetration Apart from the Stalingrad ac tion the Russian front was highly active in the Rzhev area north west of Moscow where the Ger mans said the Russians continued to attach under artillery cover and east of Leningrad where the Russians appeared to be trying to improve that citys position for a second winter of siege Evidently referring to Russian attacks designed to clear a 12 mile stretch of railway east of Leningrad and south of Lake La doga the Germans reported the failure of several Russian thrusts The Russians reported that the developing German drive toward the Groxny oil fields of the Caucasus had been halted but that the Germans were bringing up reinforce ments for a new assault Linked with the allout assault on Stalingrad were signs that the Germans were preparing a strong lyfortified winter line in Russia Even though Stalingrad was al ready heavily damaged and might be further ruined in batlle the city still could shelter a grcit chunk of the axis forccs Hitler need Stalingrad for llwl reason as well as its strategic po sition over Volga shipping Information reaching London indicated that the Germans had Jost far more than they had counted on in their drive for Stalingrad The red armys reten tion of a Don river bridgehead in the Kletskaya region northwest of Stalingrad had blocked what would have been a less costly flanking maneuver forcing the Germans to attack Stalingrad the hard way frontally The obscurity and contradic tions in the battle reports left no way of knowing Ihe precise position at Stalingrad or of judging the sticking power of cither side It was obvious however that lime was working against Adolf Hitler Bad weather is at hand Iowas Highway Toll Nears Mark of 300 By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Iowas 1942 highway fatality toll neared 300 last week as eight persons were injured fatally in motor vehicle accidents raising the years total to to 414 for a comparable period in British Progressing Steadily on Madagascar LONDON war office announced Monday that steady progress was being made in the occupation of Madagascar and that little or no resistance was being met Offer Bill to Regulate Pay at Levels Existing Aug 15 Measure Proposes Farm Prices Be Set at Level Not Below Paiity WASHINGTON specifically authorizing President Roosevelt to stabilize wages and salaries as of August 15 and farm prices at levels not bctow parity was introduced Monday in the senate in response to the presi dents demand that congress act by Oct 1 to control inflation Offered by Chairman Wagner DN Y of the hanking com mittee and Senator IJroivn D IMich pilot of previous ad miiiistriition price control i station the resolution ivould to deal with all other factors in volved in the cost of Hviiijr i Brown explained that the bill docs not require that prices for agricultural commodities so to parity but that commodities now below parity would be sub ject to natural economic condi tions The bill provides that the price ceiling shall not be fixed below the higher of these two alterna tives 1 The parity price or a com parable where one has been determined or 2 The highest market price be tween Jan 1 and Sept 15 1U42 The president could suspend section three of the price control act which prohibits the fixing ot a ceiling on agricultural prices un til they reach 110 per cent of par ity AC Jf In the case of other prices lhat figure in the cost of living Brown said here probably would be little change made from Ihe March levels at which Price Administrator Leon Hen derson has already fixed them r The president knows what is in the bill we consulted fully with the president on it and 1 think it is in conformity with the presi dents objectives Brown said Wagner announced that the banking committee would open hearings Tuesday and that they probably would last two or three days Brown oM reporters the president would be authorized and directed to take both ac tions simultaneously He re ported that the bill also would contain a broad grant of powers to the chief executive to deal with other factors involved in the cost of living In stabilizing wages and prices Brown said the president would be authorized to take into account substandard conditions and to correct any gross inequities that might arise He coulil not however force agricultural prices below parity levels 7he general effect of this limi tation Brown said would be o keep farm prices al about llicir present levels since the average of these prices now is estimated at 101 per cent of parity Labor controls were added after experienced legislators became convinced that farm state law makers would balk at trimming price ceilings below 110 per cent of parity unless a formula for limiting wages was provided too Senate Majority Leader Bark ley after a conference between senate and house leaders Sunday said there was no intention of es tablishing price ceilings at less than parity or the market price of a recent date whichever was higher Among those attending the con ference was Senator Bankhead who is a leader among farm state lawmakers and an out spoken advocate of full parity re turns for agriculture Cobbler With Foot Disability to Get in Army Appealed to F R BOONE Devoogd 25 year old Boonc cobbler is fi nally going to the only afler an appeal to President Roosevelt Harry who has a foot disability wrote to the president because his foot kept him out of the armv An interview with Iowa selec tiveScrvice officials was arranged and Devoogd is to be inducted Wednesday Hell repair shoes while the oth ers march Italians Assert British Landings at Tobruk Beaten ROME From Italian Broad British troops supported by parachutists attempted a landing Sunday night to pinch off the vital axis supply port of Tobruk some 300 miles west of the Egyptian battlefront but were beaten off by the Ger nanItalian garrison the Italian NO PASSENGERS ARE HURT IOWA PLOT IS PROBED Streamliner Traveling 80 m p h Damaged by Series of Explosions CHICAGO Flynn sxecutivo vice president of the Burlington railroad said Monday that the lines crack Denver ephyr streamliner speeding 187 lassengers at 80 miles an hour day The landing attempt in which a rcjc of British cruisers and des tvoyers participated was Jjre eded by a violent bombardment a large number of UAF planes i communique said Two of the British warships rerc reported hit by shell fire and me of the vessels was said to ive sunk later The Berlin radio carried a similar announcement but there was no immediate confirmation of the reports from any allied source the British communique from Cairo mentioning only minor air and land activity on the Egyptian front Sunday fo by ha NAZIS PREPARE WINTER LINE Report Hitler Hopes to Rest and ReEquip Badly Mauled Forces LONDON The Germans were reported Monday to be mak ing intense preparations for a stronglyfortified winter line in Russia even while the terrific frontal assault on Stalingrad is going on Behind this line appar ently Hitler hopes to regroup rest and reequip his badly mauled forces In London it was believed that tWcsc preparations ivcre the im perative result of heavy casualties and material losses in General Feclor von Bocks frontal attack on Stalingrad which the nazi com mand earlier had hoped to avoid by its more familiar swift flank ing movements Other winter line preparations reported from axis and other sources include Construction of heavy concrete fortifications at strategic points behind the present front Largescale production of heat ers and protective equipment for all mobile equipment Orders for several hundred neu locomotives Feverish construction nf bar racks in many areas of occupied Russia Germans Claim Subs Sank 19 Ships in N Atlantic Convoy NEW YORK German radio broadcast a special com munique Monday reporting that 17 boats have sunk 19 ships total and one corvette out of an allied convoy in the north Atlantic There was no allied confirma tion of this enemy report which sounded suspiciously similar to an other German special announce unconfirmed Sunday portions1 Atlantic Rubber Administrator Will Be Named Soon WASHINGTON HP DonaW M Nelson said Monday he would disclose the name of the new rub ber administrator late Monday afternoon or Tuesday morning The war production board chair man conferred with President Roosevelt on plans for putting into operation the program recom mended by the special Barucli rubber committee which urged an adminitlralor to have full and complete authority in all mat ters related to rubber nite set off by electric wires Flynn said passengers were awakened and shaken by the blasts but that all escaped in jury in what apparently was a plot to wreck the Chicago to Denver limited The dynamite was planted on joth sides of the companys west bound trunk line within a space if 516 feet Flynn said and con nected in series to the electric so that all charges went ofE simultaneously Crewmen the train found the wires leading into a field to a battery whose switch had been pulled Flynn said The explosions occurred at Nodaway Iowa 70 miles east ot Omaha but the train went on to Omaha on its own power altera fourhour delay said damage to 10 ofthe trains 14 cars included blasting ot the undercarriages breaking of a dozen windows holes in the sides of several cars floors bulged and tiling loosened and underside hatches skirting and belly plates blown off Water tanks were burst in some cars and steam traps damaged he said Xonc of the cars was derailed and the 110pound raiis were not dislodged according a local police authorities because the dynamite was planted so that it exerted its force downward in stead of upwards and laterally The dynamite apparently had been planted about a foot deep alonsr the inside of the tracks Flynn said and gouged out the roadbed and pieces of ties Authorities at Corning Iowa nine miles east of the scene of the explosions revealed that between 25 and 35 sticks of dynamite and a plunger to set them off had beep stolen last week from the rock quarry there Flynn said the 12 dynamite charges had been placed about 12 inches inside the rails live of them in a straight line along the south track and seven of them alternating on tlie inside of ths north and south tracks The federal bureau of inves tigation at DCS Moines was con ducting an investigation to de termine if a set of electric wires found alonr the track where the detonations occurred might show that the explosions resulted from a violation of Ihe federal train wrecking statutcs Flynn said the blasts occurred along a fast track down hill grade that is part of the rail roads trunk line which is tra versed every half hour by a ight or passenger train The electric wires Flynn said had been routed under the eastbound tracks and under the south rail of the westbound tracks on which the streamliner was traveling The wires hooked in series along the 51G feet of track where 25 reel into the wires When the blasts went off Flynn said the trains air brakes were damaged causing them to lock The train slid one mie to a stop flattening wheels on several of the cars The power unit of the Zephyr comprising two cars escaped the explosions but all but two of the remaining 12 cars were damaged on the underside Says Blasts Like ic Shocks L CRESTON UP F Jerome Lewis of Omaha one of the pas sengers aboard the Zephyr which experienced 12 blasts early Mon   

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