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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - September 4, 1942, Mason City, Iowa                             DEPARTMENT OF HisroHy AND L 3 IO I I j NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME THE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS VOL XLVIII ASSOCIATED MUSS ISASED WIKES MASON CITY IOWA FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 4 1942 THIS PAPER CONSISTS OF TWO SECTIONS SECTION ONE NO GRANDSTAND FULL REVUE TO OPEN Battles Are Without Precedence in Violence Reports Red Star MOSCOW Marshal Fedor von Bock beat against Stal ingrad with 25 divisions Friday in an effort to capitalize on wedges driven systematically into its de fenses but red army men were reported to have counterattacked with a violence that regained some ground northwest of the city Germans striking from the southwest succeeded in making a slight advance at enormous cost the midday war bulletin re ported Tass spoke of fighting upon the immediate approaches to the town and said the Hitlerites tank columns decimated in pre vious engagements have been considerably replenished The battles have no precedent in their violence the military newspaper Red Star said It re ported pilots from Egypt had joined the enemys air squadrons while ground troops from France were among the 25 axis divisions from a JjOOOpOOman ialin the arrnyf or rtHe assault upbrf 5t grad commercial Volga basin and a gateway to the Caspian Nazi headquarters asserted that German troops had fought their way to the western suburbs of Stalingrad Red army men fighting within the Don Bend around Keltskaya harassing the axis detachments moving east and across the Cos sack steppes occupied another village and repulsed several coun terattacks the communique an nounced The Germans gained a strate gic height in the battle for Nov orossisk soviet naval base on the Black sea more than 400 milts southwest of Stalingrad by weight of superior numbers it was announced Elsewhere in that sector how ever the Russians were reported to have withstood several and destroyed six tanks and wipet out more than 150 Germans In the Mozdok area of the central Caucasus our troops fought and wiped out an enemy tgroup which had crossed a water sovie line the communique said The Terek river flows past Mozdok and the Grozny oil fields on its way to the Caspian sea The Germans were pictured a attacking southwestern defense of Stalingrad ceaselessly with Jaige forces in a narrow sector tanks seeking to open paths for infantrymen At a cost of enormous losses the Hitlerites succeeded in mak 25 Nazi Divisions Hit Stalingrads Defenses GAIN SLIGHRYl SWOFCITYAT TERRIFIC COST itoiingrad Near risis Cry for a Red Verdun MOSCOW UPJ hattle of Stalingrad approached a cri sis Friday as the soviet defend ers were exhorted to transform the vital Volga river city into a red Verdun in the face of a crushing assault by nazi troops tanks and divebombers Front reports said that the Germans already had smashed gaping holes in the Stalingrad defense lines northwest and southwest of the city However stubbornly fighting red army troops backed up by civilian volunteers from the Stalingrad p o P u lace threw themselves into the breaches and attempted to slow theGerman advance W The Germans were reported to be bringing up heavy mobile artillery to blast their way through the inner Jines of Stal ingrads defenses and fresh ar mored and motorized divisions were spotted in action all along the halfmoon front protecting the city ing a slight advance the com munique said In other sectors the enemy attacks were re pulsed with heavy losses Soviet riflemen supported by tanks were declared to have brok en into enemy positions above the city In a lierce engagement the red army men wiped out two compan ies Hitlerites destroyed four tanksSrid nine guns and captured live mortars and eight machine guns the communique reported A Stalingrad dispatch said Ger man planes flying from various points of the compass were at tacking the city regularly in waves of 150 or more Reinforcements were declared to have given the German com mand a superiority of two or three to one over the Russians on some sectors While the soviet information bureau made no further mention of the red army offensive launched on the central front a month ago Friday a German dis patch broadcast from Berlin said strong nazi squadrons continuec their unceasing and effective at tacks on soviet troops and tank concentrations in the Hzhev area on the upper Volga northwest of Moscow Thursday de stroyed 25 soviet tanks in this sec tor and silenced a large number of guns the Berlin radio said German chasers shot down IB HAS NEW ZEALAND GUEST DES MOINES Harry E Wilkins of Des Moines Frida had as a guest Sergeant Davi Hammond 21 of New Zealand son of Warren Hammond whom she nursed in France during th World War I Young Hammond re cently completed his training in the royal New Zealand air force in Canada VOLGA RIVER BATTLE PROMT ON RUSSIA IP o3 used by Field Marshal von Bock as he closed in on Stalingrad is illustrated on this map A vast citizens army was reported battling the nazi tank ofltahn S 3S the suburbs of the City US FLYERS HIT NANCHANGSINK 7 JAP STEAMERS Other Craft Left in Flames in Air Attack Japs on Lake Poyang CHUNGKING China IP United States airmen scored dived lits on Japanese headquarters at Nanehang probably sank seven steamers and damaged others in he SingtzeHankow channel and left a number of other craft in flames on Lake Poyang in a de vastating series of raids upon the enemy in Kiangsi and Hupeh provinces Lieut Gen Joseph Stilwells headquarters announcec Friday In other action Thursday over Kweilin in coastal Chekiang pro vince Chinese informants saic sky dragons of the U S army air forces shot down five Japanese planes Thursday in a spectacular air battle The raids were made in sup port of Chinese forces beatin at the defenses of Nancnan the main Japanese base in Kiangsi and at Kinhwa Chekiang capital and bie air base from which American bombers could raid Japan General Stilwells war bulletin said that Inall Wednes days operations only one Amer ican plane was The Americans pounced on a fleet of 25 sailboats and heavj junks loaded with Japanese troopL on Lake Poyang and left casual ties among the wreckage of the burning and smashed craft thi communique said Hankow port of the Yangtze and the biggest inland Chinese city held by the enemy has been the target of previous heavy raid since the American air force wen to work in China The Japanese steamers believed sunk in Wednesdays raid all were towing heavilyladen rice barges through the SingtzeHankou channel At nearby Wuchang a motorboat was sunk and four junks heavily damaged American fighters attacked a Japanese army train moving north on the KiukiaorNaiichanr railway destroyed the locomo tive and inflicted heavy damage to trucks artillery pieces and horses moving toward the front In the 12car train At Nanchang the communiqu reported many hits were scored bj bombtoting fighters on the Japa nese headquarters at Nanchanj and upon large warehouses in tin congested Japanese area north west of the city The Tokio radio broadcast Domei dispatch reporting tha seven allied fighters were set afir Thursday by Japanese planes a Lingling southern Hunan prov ince and that in a search fo enemy warplane formations oth or raids were made on airdrome at Kweilin and Hengyang the lat ter a U S air base in Huna province Demands Juke Box Return His Dime Out Pops Quarter CAMP BLANDING Fla I want my money back loudl complained Sergeant G a r 1 a n i Morris of Black Mountain i Car after he had put a dime in juke box at a noncommissionei officers club here Either I hear those two song or I get my dime back he threat cncd as he shook the box Ou popped a quarter Before Sgt Morris could pic up the quarter out fell S105 Attribute Danish Plant Explosion to Sabotage NEW YORK Britis radio broadcast a Stockholm re port Friday saying the big Danis cellulose products factory at Valb ny near Copenhagen had been de stroyed by an explosion attribute to sabotage Three dead and cigh wounded were located in th wreckage immediately after th blast said the BBC broadcas heard by CBS The midway does landoffice business each time the crowd is emptied from the grandstand and bleachers at the North Iowa fair The picture above shows that Thurs day afternoon was no exception Last of the stragglers is just coming from the afternoon showingof the rodeo and turning toward the United Exposition shows at the west end of the midway where 10 rides and 9 shows await the customers Lock photo Kayenay engraving Steel Furnaces Will Shut Down Unless They Get More Scrap Soon WASHINGTON of the nations newspaper publishers accepted the assignment Friday to undertake a gigantic scrap salvage campaign spurred by a statement frpnyWPB Chairman Donald M Nelson that were not doing a very pFwmSirig thisTwar C Nelsons appeal for thfe Campaign voiced at a meeting of 200 publishers and editors was backed by the declaration of R W Wolcolt president of Steel company that there are only two weeks supply of steel NELSON told the group bad shape plan This was a campaign conducted scrap in the country in the hands steel mills Unless a miracle h a p pens two fur naces are go ing down over the weekend in Chicago Wolcott chair man of the American in dustries sal vage committee San Francisco Pittsburgh and Youngstown are in horrible shape Walter M Dear president of the American Newspaper Pub lishers association and publisher of the Jersey Journal at Jersey N J got a unanimous show of hands when he asked permis sion to name a committee to ini tiate a plan modeled after the Nebraska threeweek by the Omaha World Herald which netted 104 pounds of scrap for every man woman and child in Nebraska Nelson toltl the newspapermen that many the new war plants were chewing up material and producing armament at a greater rate than had been thought pos sible We must get them the mate rial he asserted and one sure way is to bring out the scrap Nelson said an allout salvage effort wonld have to include abandoned railroads old bridges and old buildings We are going to have to take bridges which may or may not be used he added but we wont take bridges or tracks that are useful to the war effort Lieut Gen Brehon Somervell chief of the army services of sup ply reported that arms produc tion schedule for September and October were so great as to ex ceed the capacity to provide ma terials and that schedules in the months following would be much heavier We havent won this war yet and well be a long time winning it Somervell said This time its not a question of how long but The job of the newspapers said Vice Admiral S M Robinson chief of the navys bureau of procure ment and materiel is to shock the people into a realization of our true state of affairs and to prove that the salvage campaign is no boondoggling gesture to build synthetic morale If the people are not con vinced your headlines may tell them how we finally arrived only to find bat we had come too late with too little and Robinson concluded A minimum of 17000000 tons of iron and steel scrap must be rounded up in the last six months of this year to prevent the steel industrys furnaces from shutting down it was estimated by Paul Cabot deputy director of WPBs conservation division Lessing J Rosenwald director of the division presided at the conference This is the first time in the war that a high government of ficial has appealed to the news papers collectively for any emer gency action it was noted by Henry Doorly president of the Omaha WorldHerald before launching into an explanation of the Nebraska plan Dear in telling Nelson we ac cept the challenge reminded the WPB chairman however that the government itself had many prob lems to iron out in connection with the collection the sorting and transportation of scrap col lected and with the price that junk dealers are permitted to pay In the Jersey City area Dear said dealers were operating at a loss of a ton Iowa Archbishop Says He Invested in Mining Ventures PORTLAND Oregon bishop Francis J Beckman of Du buque Iowa testified in federal court here Thursday that he in vested approximately 535DOOO in the gold mining ventures of Phillip Suetter who is on trial on mail fraud A statement dated May 1938 listed 5253750 in promissory notes and S59GOO in cash given by the archbishop to Suetter for which the prelate was to have received 150 units in tho Suetter Placer mines in Josephine county Ore gon and a 49 per cent interest in the John Bosco mine in Del Norte county Cal On the stand the lowan said that after the statement was made out he advanced an additional to Seutter on the latters representation that the money was needed to finance a mill Archbishop Beckman testified that more than worth of the notes was received in a 1939 settlement Bishop Paul T Rhode of Green Bay Wis another witness said the value of Suettcrs mines in Josephine county Oregon had been represented to him as be tween and S50000000 Buy War Savings Bonds and Stamps from your GlobeGazette carrier boy Tire Blowout Causes Crash Killing lowan COUNCIL BLUFFS person was killed and another critically injured Thursday nigiit as a result of a tire blowout which sent their car careening off a highway into two telephone poles near here Miss Mary Bruken hemke 18 Council Bluffs was dead when the ambulance reached the hospital The condition of Ed ward Bud Evans 18 also of Council Bluffs was described as Jap CounterAttack Takes Lanchi but Chinese Renew Assaults CHUNGKING Chines high command announced Thurs day that Lanchi 10 miles north o Kinhwa the provisional capita o Chekiang province had fallen int Japanese hands in a counterattac but saidthe Chinese were renew ing their assaults and expected t recapture it The Chinese Central Neu Agency reported from the south crn or Canton front that Chines units in an overwhelming assaul were pressing upon Sunki only 1 miles north of Canton and had re captured several more points abou 25 miles to the northwest of In metropolis On the Min river estuary a in Fukien province th Japanese also were reported with drawing GLAMOR MUSIC SHOW TO START FRIDAY EVENING Rodeo Spills Provide Thrills Hippodrome Acts Show Skill Humor The shrill yips from cowboys he riflelike reports of bulhvhips ml the pounding ot cattle and orses hoofs punctuated the final howing ot the Clyde S Miller ro leo at the North Iowa fair Friday fternoon as performers for the Victory revue arrived at the fair jounds to take over the stage for he evening slioiv Faces ot the fair officials were wreathed in smiles as the auditor announced that nearly JOOO more persons passed through the out ide gate Thursday than on the Saturday opening a year ago There was a full grandstand at riday afternoons rodeo perform nce The complete change of pro gram Friday evening iras ex pected to boost attendance at the grandstand show following the last showing of the Clyde 5 Miller rodeo on the afternoon program The Mason City pre miere of the BarnesCarruthers Victory revue is scheduled for Friday evening at 8 oclock The musical revue will hold the stage for only three nights Fri day Saturday ana Sunday it was emphasized since the troupe is scheduled at the South Dakota State fair on Labor day The hippodrome acts include Gordons Canine Racketeers the top dog act in vaudeville Hank Seiman and Charlie the wooden headed wisecracUer the Three Leonards in an aerial balancing aci the Zavctia troupe of eques KILLED IN JEEP FORT LEONARD WOOD Mo Leroy C White a 2 year old DCS Monies loua Ncgr was killed and three other soldier were injured seriously Thursdai at Richlaml Mo when an arm jeep overturned the public rcla lions office announced Friday Buy IVar Savings Bonds and Stamps from your GlobeGazette carrier boy Weather Report FORECAST MASON CITY Continued cool Friday afternoon warmer Fri day night and Saturday fore noon IOWA Warmer Friday afternoon through Saturday forenoon MINNESOTA Rising temperatures Friday afternoon through Sat urday forenoon occasional show ers northwest portion early Sat urday forenoon IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics Maximum Thursday 70 Minimum Thursday night 42 At 8 a m Friday 46 YEAR AGO Maximum 75 Minimum fiV Precipitation trace North Iowa Fair Program FRIDAY Grandstand opens Concert by Kcnsett band p JIason City premier of the BarnesCarruthcrs Victory Revue with the Victory Octet the Four Liberty Dancers and Miss Jean Allen Hippoarome acts by Gordons Canine Racketeers Hank bciman and Charlie the Zavatta troupe the Three Leonards the Zoppi troupe the Lcs Juvclys Larimer and Hudson Novak and Fay Retreat with loweringof he colors SATURDAY Childrens Day and 4H Club Day Gates open Free outside uate for all children who have not reached their 12th birthday admission 5 cents for those between 12 and 16 to pay federal tax United Exposition Shows on midway throughout the day a m tH club baby beef judging county 4H club demonstra tion teams fern Gordo Worth Mitchell ttriKht 1aPm Franklin Hancock f I pm Winnebaso Pm Kossuth pm Grandstand open Concert by St Anssar baud Judging contest pm Flajt raisins and prayer for victory Exhibition drill by crack squad of 25 from naval train ing school at Iowa State college Jimmie Lynchs Death Dodgers in worlds fair thril show Hippodrome acts opens for evening show Ansgar band Concert by St p Revue and hippodrome acts in BarnesCarruthcr state fair circuit Parade and drills by naval training school unit Flat lowering at close of program War Flavor in Saturday Events The North Iowa fair pro grams Saturday will have a war flavor Twentyfive snappy sail ors from the naval training school at Iowa State college with their officer in charge will give an exhibition of parades and drills on both the afternoon and evening programs They will be here the one day only giving way Sunday and Monday after noons to the drill unit from Ma son Citys own company E of the state guard trians Larimer and Hudson a former Mason City girl in a comic bicycle act the Victory octet the Four Liberty dancers the Zoppi roupe juggling on ladders and and Fay outstanding clowns on the outdoor stage Wildly bucking broncos and vi ious Brahma bulls which at empted to catch the rodeo clown in the track afoot headlined the show in its last appearance A favorite with the crowd was Charlie Shultz until this year with the 101 Ranch From his irst appearance on the track in his bucking Ford with the back scat loaded with youngsters he never failed to draw a laugh witli each new trick The trained burro Honey suckle and the two mules Mary and Dynamite draw exclama tions of wonder as well as laughs during their routines with the clown Bob Rindt of lUinot N Dak caused hands in the audience tn twitch involuntarily as his bull whips snapped bits of paper from the fingers of pretty Doris Rindt Climax of the act was the crack ing of the bullwhip around the throat of the young woman Fancy riders and ropers were enthusiastically applauded par ticularly the squaredance of the range a quadrille on horseback Millers famous while Arabian horses also scored with individual dance steps including the rhumba Jersey bounce and Cakewalk Feet hurrying homeward after the afternoon performance Thurs day slowed ot the whine ot a huge power driven circle saw biting into cottomvood logs near the en trance to the fairgrounds Hun dreds soon stood around the Tig ging watching the huge logs some 3 feet in diameter travel to and from the saw on an automatic carrier which slid them toward the saw for a new bite each time a board slid away The saw is part of the co operative exhibit for farmers which is in charge of experts from the extension department at Ames It includes also a clinic In which farmers may learn the proper care of farm machinery Livestock judging got under way Thursday and all ribbons I   

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