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Mason City Globe Gazette: Tuesday, August 4, 1942 - Page 1

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - August 4, 1942, Mason City, Iowa                             NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME COUP DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY AND ARCHIVES THE NEWSPAPER THAT v HOME EDITION MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS VOL XLVIII ASSOCIATED PBESS AND UNITED PRESS FULL LEASED WIRES FIVE CENTS A COPY MASON CITY IOWA TUESDAY AUGUST 4 1942 THIS PAPER CONSISTS Of TWO SECTIONS SECTION ONE NO 254 Elephants Trumpet Lions Roar Tigers Scream Riot Guns Bark as Ringling Tent Burns CLEVELAND Tues day swept the menagerie tent of the Ringling brothers circus de stroying at least 60 wild and trained animals Terrified animals were burned alive in their eases before the eyes of 5000 persons at the circus grounds on Clevelands lakefront Other animals including an elephant and several giraffes tore loose from their manacles Police used riot guns to destroy the giraffes The death toll included Ten camels Three elephants Three giraffes Several lions tigers and leop ards Many smaller animals The entire menagerie tent was destroyed The crowd watched the catas trophe with helpless fascination Some of the animals raced at large aflame At one point when the fire was at its height an os trich with plumes blazing ran from the menagerie tent The flames were patted out by circus em ployes and the bird was captured by trainers An eyewitness counted 30 car casses lying amid the embers of I the menagerie grounds and 20 others their pelts charred lying in their cages At that time the fire was under control although straw in the tent still was smoldering The blaze apparently started on top of one of the animal cages and spread quickly through the rest of the menagerie AH available squads of police were called to the scene to handle the noon hour crowd of 5000 per sons which was drawn by the heavy smoke and billowing flames The shrill cries of burning ani mals were heard for blocks around Circus attendants police and firemen were hard put to keep order in the surging throng An entire row of sideshow tents was torn down to keep the flames from spreading to the big top The loud trumpeting of ele phants and shrill neighing of horses could be heard for blocks as the animals milled madly in the confusion i Fifty elephants were marched from the grounds some of their hides badly singed One of them the skin burned from thvce fourths of his body and blood streaming from him broke away from the handlers and was shot eight times in the brain Horses were herded into a park ing lot Police said they shot at least 26 animals The number burned to death was not immediately ascev tainable Circus officials esti mated the damage at They said much of the loss was irreparable since tents wagons and steel cages could not be re placed because of shortages No performance was in progress al the time of the fire The after noon show was canceled but cir cus officials expected to slage the regular performance Tuesday night Eight camels tethered inside the tent were burned to death and 10 other camels were led from the flames with their hair burned almost entirely from their backs Numerous monkeys birds and dogs were among the other ani mals destroyed The gorilla Gargantun one ol the main attractions of the great est show on earth was not harmed There were scenes of indes cribable animal agony Iions still alive paced helplessly in their flaming cages the hair burned off A brace of Bengal tigers were similarly rapped A number of zebras created a nearpanic among the thousands of spectators when they broke loose from their halters and gal loped on to the nearby New York Central railroad tracks before they wore rounded up U S coast guardsmen armed with rifles and a city detective Lloyd Trunk shot some of the agonized animals as quickly as the circus veterinary indicated their cases were hopeless Girl performers in the circus joined toiling men in beating down the flames and doing what they could to quiet the animals Girls stepped into several of the bucket brigades formed by members of the circus own tire fighting forte 1olice rushed seven ambu lances to the scene and Cleve land firemen took fire pumpers and a rescue sciuad to the fire The crew of a water pinnniiiK station just across Lakeside avenue joined in fighting the flames It was the second major disaster to befall the Ringling Brothers Barnum Bailey circus in two years Last season many of the show elephants were poisoned Fortunately the fire was con lined principally to the menagerie The famed big top itself escaped The circus opened here Monday for a four day stand CLAIM 180 MILE GAIN PAST ROSTOV Reveal Gandhi Proposed to Get Freedom for India So He Could Negotiate With Japs Draft Was Rejected for More Moderate Plan by Congress Party GREEN MURRAY AGREE TO TAKE 1ST UNITY STEP Will Arrange Parleys Looking Toward Merger of CIO and AF of L CHICAGO Green and Philip Murray agreed Tuesday to arrange negotiating parleys looking toward peace and merger between the rival American Fed eration of Labor and the Congress of Industrial Organizations split since 1935 Murray the CIO president in a letter to Green the AFL head Sunday proposed establishment of organic unity between the la bor groups Tuesday while both were in Chicago Green not only agreed to negotiations but said in a statement it was his under standing that organic unity means the merging of the two organizations into one the set ting up of one national labor movement clothed with au thority to speak for the organ ized workers of the nation The rift in organized labor oc curred when John L Lewis at odds with his old friend Mur ray organized the CIO in 1935 Lewis United Mine Workers and other big unions broke away from the AFL Twice since the flutter ing doves of peace were driven off by discord in 1937 and 1939 Green said he was confident a settlement could be reached fail to all concerned The veteran AFL leader said in a statement that the standing peace committee of the AFL was ready to meet with a committee appointed by President Philip Murray ot the CIO who made peace overtures in a letter to Green Sunday Green added that steps would be taken at once to arrange a time and place for a meeting of the negotiators y y y Wliilc Murray was in Chicago also to address the convention of the ClOUnitcd Automobile Aircraft Agricultural Imple ment Workers Green said Reestablishment of organic unity in the ranks of organized labor is the greatest contribu tion the AFL and the CIO can make at this time to the success of the war effort He said peace between the great rival labor groups would eliminate division discord and jurisdictional strife and expedite i war production and that it would permit labor to speak with a single more effective voice both in protecting the social and industrial interests of work ers today and when world peace is finally negotiated I am confident Green con tinued that actuated by a desire for peace which prevails through out the ranks of labor the con ferees will be able to reach a settlement fair to all concerned Pictures From Axis Sources NEW DELHI British government for India reported Tuesday that Mohandas K Gand hi had proposed to his allIndia congress party this declaration If India were freed her first step probably would be to nego tiate with Japan f if Gandhi himself in Bombay acknowledged use of such lang uage but suggested it was for bargaining purposes and said lie wanted to help China The statement on negotiating with Japan was contained in resolution disobedience Gandhis draft of calling for a civil campaign by the allIndia con j gross party Submitted April 27 this draft was rejected after a more moder ate nationalist leader Pandit Jaw aharlal Nehru vigorously op posed it A resolution couched in different terms now is being con sidered by the partys working committee Gandhis draft as released Tuesday by the government was quoted as saying Japans quarrel is not with India She is warring against the British empire Indias par ticipation in the war has not been with the consent of the representatives of the Indian people It was a purely British act If India were freed her first step would probably be to negotiate with Japan According to the government summary Nehru in successfully opposing this resolution declared It inevitably would make the world think we were passively linking up with the axis powers1 Upon learning of the govern ment statement Gandhi Tuesday asserted I purposely incorporated the sentence about negotiations with Japan and if ultimately it was dropped I associated myself with the deletion He said that if India were freed immediately be wanted to go to Japan and plead with her to free China It this plea were rejected he then would tell the Japanese lo expect stubborn resistance in India ho added German caption of this picture says the artillery piece shown is a heavy craft gun in action against soviet tanks on the eastern front and that the gun had been used in the battles against the Belgium fortress EdenEmael as indicated on the gun barrel The picture was received in New York from neutral Portugal JAPAN MOVING MORE SOLDIERS TO GONA BUNA Allied Planes Hammer at Many Sectors Chinese Are Cheered By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Japanese seaborne reinforce ments were reported moving down the coast of New Guinea Tuesday bolstering a land threat to the united nations outpost at Fort Moresby while elsewhere in the far Pacific theater allied flyers hammered the enemy in many sectors Advices to Gen Douglas Mac Arthurs headquarters in Aus tralia said enemy ships were eii routc to the Papuan peninsula presumably to strengthen Japa nese forces which landed July 22 in the GonaBuna area across the 120m i I ew i I e peninsula from PjriMorcshy WILL ANNOUNCE SCHEDULE DES MOINES state AAA committee notified county committees to hold up sales of governmentheld wheat for feed ing purposes until the new price schedule is announced in a few days Service PHOENIX Ariz Mao McElhinney forgot to remove his prized address book when he sent his shirt to the downtown laun dry Back came the clean shirt ad dress book buttoned neatly into the pocket In it were a dozen additional girls names addresses and phone numbers The caption accompanying this picUire received in New York from neutral Portu gal describes it as one sent by radio from Tokio to Berlin showing Japanese troops withtheir rising sun flag after landing in the Aleutian islands DOG DAYS Friday and Saturday In retailing slowmoving merchandise is known as dogs or pups Odds and ends broken run of sizes soiled merchandise articles that must be sold this season all will have to find a new home Friday and Saturday To know where to find the kind of dogs you like read the Dog Days advertisements in the GlobeGazette LINDY TESTIFIES IN PELLEY CASE Has Not Tried to Learn Publics Attitude Since U S Has Entered War INDIANAPOLIS A Lindbergh made a brief ap pearance as a defense witness Tuesday in the sedition trial of William Dudley Pclley testifying that he had made no effort to j Icarn of the publics attitude to ward the war since the United States entered the conflict I have devoted my time and energy to doing what I can to help with the war effort the aviator replied when Floyd G Christian defense attorney asked what he had observed as to any change in public opinion about this nation participation in the war I have made no effort to learn of any change in the publics at titude since the United States went to war Earlier Lindbergh who was ac tive in the America First move ment prior to Americas entry into the war had testified it was his impression that the majority o the people of this county were op posed to going into 13 efore we were attacked Lindbergh occupied the witness chair only 15 minutes He was not cross examined by the gov ernment After he left the stand the trial of the former silver shirt leader and two associates accused of in terfering with the war effort by he publication ot seditious state ments was adjourned until Wed nesday because defense attorneys said they had no other witnesses immediately available Lindberghs appearance brought F R REVIEWS NAZI SENTENCE Careful Study Given Findings of Military Commission at Trial crowd to the federal courtroom The lanky Lindbergh coiled himself in the witness chair and crossed his legs as he underwent examination by Christian Escaped Convict Kills Wife Commits Suicide ROUNDUP Mont because his wife refused him money to buy gasoline to make a getaway Harvey Cline an es caped convict shot and killed her and committed suicide Sheriff Jess Burns reported Tuesday DIES AFTER BEE STIXG AFTON Sullivan 49 farmer died Monday about three quarters of an hour afier he had been stung on the back of his neck by a bee WASHINGTON Roosevelt gave over virtually the entire day Tuesday to what an ncd a very careful re view of the findings and sentence of the military commission which tried eight nazis on charges of en tering the United States for sab otage activities There was no indication that Mr Roosevelts decision on the recommendations of the commis sion would conic Tuesday inas much as he had a tall stack of documents to go through To provide ample time for this he scheduled only a late afternoon press conference a late meeting with Elmer Davis director of the office of war information and an engagement earlier to bestow a congressional medal of honor on Lieut John B Bulkley the tor pedo boat expert who took Gen Douglas MacArthur and high Fili pino officials to Australia Allied headquarters said the situation was still unchanged at Kokoda halfway across the pen insula the farthest point of the Japanese advance toward Port Moresby United nations planes strafed Japanese troops and po sitions in the sector Monday starting numerous fires Other allied planes raided the LacSalamaua area 150 miles north of Buna and hit a Japanese cargo ship which was beached in flames On the China war front Licul Gcn Joseph Stilwclls headquar ters announced that U S army air raiders dropped a 550pound bomb squarely on Japanese head quarters at Linchuan in Kiangsi province and machinegunned two Japanese river transports V American flyers also rained quarterton bombs on Japanese and troop at Linchuan Simultaneously a Chinese army spokesman reported Chinese troops encircled Linchuan and reached the citys west and south gates A Chinese government spokes man discussing the change in the China war since the U S air force swung into action month ago declared Before Hlir American air force appeared Ihc Japanese conltl do great damage to us even with i small air force Now the situation is changing Japan is setting a headache trying to solve the hitherto non existent problem of protecting her airfields nnd strongholds which are widely scattered and great in number At the same time U S air force headquarters in India an nounced that American bombers flying through rains so thick it was like submarine navigation had pounded the Japaneseoccu pied Myitkyina airdrome in cen tral Burma with such devastating effect that it had been knocked out as a bac for enemy attacks on al lied planes ferrying war goods lo Nazis Assert Voroshilovsk Is Captured BERLIN German Broadcast Recorded by United Press in New York The high command said Tuesday that its forces had driven Hit miles into the Caucasus from Rostov to take the town of Voro sliilovsk and reach the Kubun river at several places The industrial town of Voro shilovsk was taken nftcr slifl street lighting1 the communique said The cily is only 10 miles north of the RostovBaku rail road which also provides the only link between Stalingrad and the oil riches of the Cau casus The German forces al ready had cut the Stalingrad leg of the line 100 miles north of Voroshilovsk at Salsk DNB news agency in an ampli fication ot the communique said that the BaguRostov railway al ready had been cut south of Voro shilovsk indicating that the Ger man forces bad bypassed the town leaving behind only a force RUSSIA ADMITS RETREAT MADE IN SALSK AREA Red Troops Throw Back Several Fierce Attacks West of Stalingrad MOSCOW A great weight of German tanks and reserve roop actively supported by clouds of divebombers pressed icnvily on the entire soviet south ern front Tuesday and a Russian communique acknowledged Hull red army forces had fallen back to new positions in the Salsk re gion 100 miles southeast of Rostov after repulsing fierce enemy at tacks The Germans claimed they hnd captured the town of Voroshilovsk 100 miles south of Salsk and had reached the Kubau river at sev eral points in that Caucasus arca strong enough to take it The agency said the line had been cut between Armavir im portant pipe lincrailrivor ter minal 40 miles west of Vovoshil ovsk and the town of Mineraine Vodi in several places Formations of the air force ranged ahead of the naxi motor ized ground troops to soften the way They attacked with deva stating effect enemy columns which were said to be flooding back from the Kuban and Voro shilovsk the communique saiil The luftwaffe bombed day and night enemy airfields transport columns and railway installations up to the northern foothills of the Caucasus the high command added MILD REESE 67 DIES SUDDENLY Succumbs to Heart Attack While Sitting in Chair in Driveway Milo C Recc G7 died suddenly while sitting in n chnir in tlic driveway of an abandoned filling station 401 Carolina avenue nnrlli east about 2 oclock Monday after noon Death was caused by a licurt at The Salsk withdrawal came after wildriding Cossacks vol unteering to try to stem the German drive had ridden info the battle in an effort to save their villages West of Stalingrad in the Klel skaya sector the stiffening Rus sian troops threw back several at tacks by Italian infantry sup ported by tanks and killed 2000 enemy soldiers the midday com munique said Hcd Star dispatches told of counterattacks in that re gion in which the Germans had been driven from some of their strategic positions and cut off from communications An ominous note sounded in a dispatch to the newspaper Izvcstia which said that Germans in superior numbers had broken through Russian lines and were attempting to cross the Don at Kletskaya 80 miles northwest of Stalingrad tack according to Coroner R E Smiley Mr Hcese had moved lo tlic sta tion at Fourth street and Carolina avenue northeast where planned to make his home was still sitting in the chair with his hat on when he was dis covered by a delivery boy No relatives have been located according to officers who investi gated The body was taken to the Meyer funeral home China Buy War Savings Bonds and Stamps from your GlobeGazelle carrier boy Asleep on Lake Dock Soldier Roils Off Drowns at Lake Park LAKE PARK Ario Meyers 23 Pipesloiie Minn was drowned in Silver lake Monday night when he rolled off a dock bench where he had gone to fleep Sergeant Meyers and a friend Bob McGuigan had eaten late in a nearby night club and both went to sleep on the benches The sol dier was visiting here with mem bers of his family while on fur lough from Ft Warren Wyo His sister Doris Meyers Lake Park life guard aided in resusci tation attempt Meyers was the son of John Meyers Pipestonc but had livec here for many years with a grand mother Mrs Emma Lage Weather Report FORECAST MASON CITY Slightly Tucsdny afternoon Tuesday night and Wednesday forenoon IOWA Not much change in tem perature Tuesday afternoon through Wednesday forenoon Scattered showers west portion late Tuesday night througl Wednesday forenoon MINNESOTA Warmer norlhcas and extreme north portions Tuesday night scattered show ers west postion Tuesday nigh and west and central Wednes day forenoon IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics Maximum Monday 79 Minimum Monday night 52 At 8 a m Tuesday 68 YEAR AGO Maximum ill Minimum 67 Precipitation 01 All German attempts to es tablish bridgeheads were frus trated however the dispatch said Russian units were re ported to have innvcil around tlic flanks of the Germans anil cut off their communications The Russians now arc ing In wipe out the advanced German units before they can rcpstablisli contact Ihc news paper reported The Germans arc striving lo y fuel nnd ammunition to the units but Ihc red air orce is fighting off the supply lanes Izvcstia said One scout unit cut in several laces the main road over which lie Germans were moving muni ions and reserves Red Star said The navy paper Red Fleet said ailors on the Sea of Azov at acked the Germans and Ru manians from the rear while laval aviators pounded crossings Coastal artillery also was in ac ion In the Kushchevka fighting onc the Germans were reported encountering increased resistance the communique told how Jic enemy several times at tempted unsuccessfully to force crossings over a vixer It was there in the western aucasus about 30 miles south of Rostov that the Russians were reported making a desperate land to halt the German drive toward the oil tanks of Maikop in the foothills of the Caucasus mountains Kushchcvka is some 80 miles west of Salk where the soviet troops moved back to new posi tions The Cossacks hail been pic tured as offering furious resist ance lo the Germans in the Salsk area Rut Red Star dis closed that Ihc defenders were in difficulty with the somewhat negative statement hat they   

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