Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Share Page

Mason City Globe Gazette: Thursday, July 2, 1942 - Page 1

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - July 2, 1942, Mason City, Iowa                             HISTORY AND DES M01NES ARCH IVES IA NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME THE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS VOL XLVIII ASSOCIATED PEESS WglTO MASON CITY IOWA THUESDAY JULY 2 1942 THIS CONSISTS OF TWO SECTIONS SECTION ONE NO 226 REDS TELL OF Military Group to Try Cases of 8 STREET FIGHTS IN SEVASTOPOL Russian Communiques Ignore Nazi Claims to Capture of City MOSCOW The red army reported at noon Thursday that bitter fighting was continuing in Sevastopol and dispatches tele graphed Wednesday to the army newspaper Red Star said German assault troops had carried the battle into the city itself Red Stars accounts pictured heavily superior numbers of nazi forces rollinr slowly for ward against staunch defenders of the Crimean base The situation in the last soviet stronghold in the Crimea ivas described as extremely tense and difficult Two successive Russian com muniques have ignored German claims of having captured Sevas topol The latest information came in dispatches from Sevastopol Wed nesday to the army newspaper Bed Star The enemy continues to move forward slowly to the outskirts of ihecity in a number of sectors Red Stars correspondent tele grafched In some places the enemy suc ceeded in carrying the battle di rectly into Sevastopol city The dispatch ended Neverthe less the glorious defenders of Se vastopol continue their stubborn resistance to the enemy With hand to hand fighting going on and ihe Germans nu merically 10 to 15 times super ior at some points red army troops and Black sea fleet sail ors uere reported to be refusing to surrender One company which repulsed five attacks by two enemy battal ions retreated only when the Ger mans sent in a third fresh battal ion An artillery battery was cited also for firing constantly until it was outflanked and surrounded Then it broke its way through the enemy encirclement and resumed fighting Russian forces fought on over night in the Sevastopol sector and the red army amassed a toll about 7000 German dead in re pulsing attacks over a 48hour pe riod on the Kursk front 500 miles to the north the soviet govern ment reported at noon Thursday The defenders of Sevastopol have covered themselves with unfading glory the soviet in formation bureau said They arc firmly and couraireously from the German fascist invaders every inch of soviet land A guerrilla detachment in the region of Germanoccupied Orel was declared to have slain nearly 1000 invaders in two months bat tered their communication lines and captured rifles machineguns and severs thousand cartridges Numerically forces seeking superior German to expand their lodgements cast of Kharkov were declared to have sacrificed more than 1000 men in two days of ac tion against soviet lines and then retreated to their original In he Kursk direction our troops beat off German attacks inflicting heavy lossc on the enemy the information bureau said In two days of fighting so viet units destroyed 39 German lanks and armored tars 54 mor tars and 24 guns Soviet flyers were reported to riV n r rralplanes von R b r n ore ommsson Bocks offensive there Brcnnan from Scranlon in a day GERMAN CLAIMS NOT DOUBTED IN LONDON LONDON German claim to having captured the Cri mean naval base of Sevastopol is doubted in London in formed British sources said Thurs day Buy War Savings Bonds and Stamps from your GlobeGazelle carrier boy CLAIMS ALAMEIN TAKEN w Wins Confidence Vote I WASHINGTON Roosevelt created Thursday a military commission of seven army generals to try eight per sons accused of landing in Florida and New York to try to commit sabotage The commission was set up by means of a presidential militaiy order and it will begin its delib erations in Washington July 3 An accompanying proclamation denied the accused men access to civil courts The prosecution is to be con ducted by the attorney general and the judge advocate general the military order said and two colonels Cassius M Dowell and Kenneth Royall will be counsel for the defense Mr Roosevelt provided that the record of the trial including any judgment or sentence should be transmitted directly to him foi his action The death penalty is expected to be sought by the government The generals appointed to the military tribunal are Major Gen erals Frank R McCoy who will preside Walter S Grant Blanton Winship and Lorenzo D Gasser and Brigadier Generals Guy V Heniy John T Lewis and John T Kennedy New Employe Told His Output Is Too High Arrests His Tormentor NEW YORK Wall Street Journal under the headin True Story of the Week Thurs day reported this occurrence at a midwestern war plant A big tough worker told a new employe he was turning out too many units a day and had better slow down Next day the new man upped his output Were at war he explained The third day when the new mans production reached another new high the other work er violently told him he was out So are you replied the bullied one He showed an F B I badge attached handcuffs to the tor menter and marched him the en tire length of the assembly line SEARCH HOMES OF 225 ALIENS Contraband Seized by FBI at Altoona Pa Warnings Are Issued ALTOONA Pa five Federal Bureau of Investiga tion agents assisted by local and state motor police seized a quan tity of contraband articles Wed nesday night in spot searches at the homes of 225 enemy aliens in this important rail center on the main line of the Pennsylvania railroad The federal agents saying the searches were routine declined to connect them with the disclosure by FBI Chief J Edgar Hoover Saturday that eight German sabo teurs caught in this country had planned to destroy the Pennsylva nia line along horseshoe curve among other objectives On the scenic horseshoe curve seven miles west of here the rail road winds along the rugged Alle gheny mountains Sears special agent in charge of the FBI office at Phila delphia said the fourhour spot searches were made for such con traband articles as short wave ra dios cameras binoculars and weapons In all 50 officers par ticipated in the hunt Some enemy aliens were ques tioned at their homes while oth ers were taken to the downtown federal building for questioning quesonng r al Gen before US Commissioner Joseph Sears said no arrests were made but that the aliens were warned against further violations of the e presidential proclamation concern 70 Trmenf Hivf Q1U mg enemy nationals in this coun ons I Ulrt OllQ II S ENROLLMENT DES MOINES D Mc Comfas Des Moines superinten dent of schools credited enlistment of 17 and 18 year old youths in the armed forces with a slump of more than 1000 in high school en rollments here Alexandria Threatened by Axis Drive An Italian reconnaissance plane made this aerial viewof he British ivivd 1 tho U S rani Insr n Charge 20 With Helping Fuel Subs ARRESTED IN Kidnapers Believed to Have CARIBBEAN AREA Marshal FBI Agents Enter Search for Men in Army Uniform Prominent Businessmen Trusted Panama Canal Zone Workers Included By CHANDLER DIEHL UNITED STATES ARMY HEADQUARTERS Panama Canal Zone Gen Frank An drews defense commander of the Caribbean area announced Thurs day the arrest of 20 person who the army charges formed spy rings engaged in fueling axis sub marines and disclosed information of United States shipping to the enemy A roundup completed June 25 included arrests extending from British Honduras to Panama Involved are prominent busi nessmen laborers night club host esses coast guard shipping em ployes and trusted Panama Canal Zone workers Al 20 persons are now being held for trial The governor of British Hon duras is awaiting the authority of the British government before de termining trial procedure of arrested in his territory A United States patrol plane uncovered the first definite evi dence of the location of the rings operations when it spotted a slow ship in the Caribbean carying oil drums Ownership of the vessel was traced and a U S army observer placed on the trail Attempts were made to poison him and to sab otage his plane He survived the attempts and with the cooperation of the army navy Canal Zone and British au thorities he managed to round up all he behoved to be involved in cluding one man who was arrest ed at sea by the crew of a U S naval patrol olanc General statement We must understand that the enemy probably expects us n smash this ring sooner or later ami most likely has preconceived plans o place another echelon into op eration Our intelligence agencies will leave no stone unturned in ferret mR out the evidence of any such activity will destroy the en emy agencies before their activi ties can be used to their further advantage1 Man Dies 2 Hurt as Andrews issued tiiis WISNER Nebr Lons of dirt trapped three mem bers of a bridge crew in a slide four miles west and a mile north of Wisncr Thursday killing one The other two escaped with bruises Otto Splitburger 43 Wisner who was in the deep est portion of a ditch from H to 16 eel deep was killed PRESTON Minn town marshal reported Thursday that he fired several shots Wednesday night at two men wearing army uniforms who were believed to have kidnaped a 16yearold girl near Decorah Iowa Tuesday night Marshal Elmer Hanson Mabel Minn which is near the loiva bor der said he chased the suspects for several blocks and fired sev eral shots but they escaped The men were alone in the car V He said one of them probably is an Austin Minn youth who de serted from the army He was being sought for passing worthless checks The suspect Hanson said has relatives in Mabel where the kidnaped girl had been visiting relatives DECORAH Federal Bureau of Investigation entered the search Thursday for Margaret Kollie FBI agents were said to be in vestigating o report that the girl and her alleged abductors were seen Wednesday night enroutc into Minnesota in on automobile Sheriff George Harms of Win neshiek county said however the latter clue might possibly be just another rumor At Des Moincs Iowa FBI Chief James Dalton confirmed the re port that federal agents are work ing on the case The state police radio late Thursday morning said a car ihought to answer the description of ihe auto allegedly being driven by the kidnapers had been seen going north on highway 218 from Cedar Falls and bearing no license plates An earlier report carried on the state police radio at a m Thursday said the car had been reported seen heading south on highway 52 from Minnesota into Iowa One man in uniform and one in civilian clothes uere re portedly seen in the car and it was thought a girl was also a passen ger Sheriff George Harms said here Thursday morning that although no reliable clues had been picked up things arc liable to pop all at once Miss Rollie is the daughter of Mr and Mrs Juiius Rollie of near Hesper Iowa Orville Salveson 30 farmer liv ing in the same community re ported he met Miss Rollie Tuesday nght at Mabel Minn where she iad been visiting relatives and they were on their way to a dance when they picked up the two uniformed men on the highway Salveson said the men ordered m to drive on a side road where they took S33 trom him and put RIAKGARET ROLLIC him out of the car while they drove on taking Miss Rollie with them The car was described as a 1S38 model black twodoor Chevrolet sedan bearing license No 061980 Miss Rollie was described as being 5 feet 4 inches tall with blonde hair worn in a long bob and she was dressed in white blouse striped skirt white ank lets and red shoes Salveson said he could give no very definite description of the two men excepting that they were in khaki uniforms wore overseas caps and were about 21 years old Weather Report FORECAST MASON CITY Continued coot Thursday afternoon and Thurs day night Slightly warmer Fri day forenoon IOWA Somewhat warmer Thurs day afternoon forenoon through Friday MINNESOTA Warmer Thursday afternoon through Friday fore noon Scattered light showers north and central portion IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics Maximum Wednesday 72 Minimum Wednesday night 46 At 8 a m Thursday 62 YEAR AGO Maximum 73 Minimum 51 BRITISH BEAT OFF ROMMELS HEAVY ATTACKS Battle Rages Along 35 Mile Bottleneck in Egyptian Desert By nOGEK D GREENE Associated Press War Editor Italian headquarters asserted Thursday that axis troops had stormed and captured El Alamein only G5 miles west of Britains great Alexandria naval base ns the British fought along a 3imilc bottleneck front in a desperate attempt to save the Suez canal and perhaps the entire middle east from German conquest Simultaneously British im perial headquarters declared that Gen Sir Claude Auchin lecks armies meeting the axis in full shock of baltlc after a 350mile retreat in three weeks hcnl off heavy attacks at El Alamcin Wednesday f Describing preliminary phases of the great battle as not unfavor able for the British commu nique said One attack by enemy tanks effected a temporary break in a defended locality but later the enemy tanks were driven out and engaged by our columns Terse dispatches from the front said the British1 supported by American 28 ton General Grant tanks were engaging Field Mar shal Erwin Rommels victory flushed invaders in heavy fighting from the in land to the Qattara depression Sweeping over Ihe narrow fighting zone allied warplanes in cluding American Kiilyhawk fighters blasted enemy tanks and troops A German broadcast echoing Ins the Italian claim ilcclarcil that Rammers armies were pur suing the British in retreat to ward the Nile after axis troops had broken through at El Ala mcin V Dispatches indicated that Rom mel struck under cover of a swirling slandstorm assaulting the main British forces ranged along the coastal plain in n frontal thrust aimed at Alexandria An Italian communique said the British positions were tena ciously defended and were over run only after sharp fighting Our air force which repeatedly intervened in the field dominated the battle in the sky the fascist war bulletin assorted While the fall of El Alamcin would not be disastrous in itself the axis claims indicated that Rommels invaders had already pushed five miles or more into the British system of defense in depth The British front line previously been described as 70 miles west of Alexandria and five miles west of El Alamcin Agree Desert Battle Intense LONDON tfp Fighting the battle for Egypt in a desert sand storm the British announced Thursday the repulse of powerful axis armored and infantry attacks El Alamein 70 miles west of Alexandria but the Germans and Italians asserted they had seized that drab coastal village and were pursuing the British headlong to ward the inviting green delta if the IVile All sources agreed on the in tensity of the conflict but on nothing else Farther south on ihe cdRc of he great Qaltara depression British forces ranged 17 miles west of their positions to cngajjc axis units but he main battle obviously was along he coastal road toward Alexandria where Gen Sir Claude 1 E Aueliin lech chose to make his stand against persistent frontal as sault Despite the sandstorm the RAF continued intense bombing and strafing of the enemy in the El Alamein area the British said but the axis claimed domination of the skies over the battlefield The Germans credited divebombers with paving the wav for Ihe claimed breakthrough El Alamcin Allied Reinforcements Reach or Are Hearing Battlefield in Egypt LONDON Minister Chinchill won an over whelming vote of confidence from the house of commons Ilitirsday alter he had gravely asserted the allied position in the Mediterranean and middle east war zones as a near disaster with a hope of victory pinned on very consider reinforcements now in progress The vote was 475 to 25 The parliamentary victory came at the end of a speech one hour and 28 minutes long in which Churchill staunchly defended his direction of the war as the best possible under the circumstances Churchill sketched a dark picture of the battle of Egyijt He said it had developed a re cession of uur hopes and pros pects in the middle cast and Highlights LONDON Minister Winston Churchill won a vote oC confidence in the house of com mons Thursday after a dramatic speech in which he that 1 The axis armies of nari Mar 1 shal Erwin Rommel had ad vanccd 400 miles across the desert and were approaching the Nile valley after battles in which the British lost 50000 men and large amounts of material induding 30 tanks out or 300 in one battle and suffered an cnlirclv unex pected defeat at Tobruk The fighting in north Africa had changed the military situ ation drastically in the whole Mediterranean theater md put Britain in a moment of mortal peril unequaled since the fall France 3 The British held superiority in men artillery anlcs and air planes at Ihe start of the battle for Libya and in all the totals sent to the middle east from the em pire and to lesser extent from the United State amounted to more than 9511000 men 4500 laiilcs 0000 aircraft almost 5000 pieces of artillery 50001 ma ciiineguns and more than 100000 vehicles 4 He has never shared that view that this would he a short war or would end in 19I2 but I affirm with confidence that the general strength of the united na tions has greatly improved since the turn of the It is likely tn be a long Churchill added 5 The balance of naval power in the Pacific has been defin itely altered in our favor ns a result of the splendid achieve ments of American and other forces in the battles of the Coral sea and Midway which have not received the at tention they deserve in Britain Although the summer is half gone Hitler has not been able to start against Russia major which offensive has been bolstered by 2000 British tanks and the Russians will surprise him again a they have in the past A massed Japanese invasion I of Australia would be most hazardous it present and the al lied watchword throughout the southeast Pacific is attack 8 The army in India is larger than ever before in history and Ceylon is now strongly de fended by naval air and military forces against a Japanese offen sive A A nciver and faster tank than the present heavy British tank known as the Churchill has been designed and will soon be in pro duction bill most British air mar mediterranean iinetiualcri since the fall of France To this he added without elab oration a statement that at nnv moment we may receive news of grave importance The 475 to 25 vote left 115 nt the houses 615 members un accounted for Of the 115 some members un doubtedly expressed partial dis approval ot the Churchill govern ment by abstaining from the vote but many pould not attend the session because of wartime duties and other causes Tremendous cheeringCreeled announcement of the vote which squelched the most scrfous ehal ICIIKC yet made to Churcliiirs premiership The opposition vote was the highest since the prime minister look office May 30 1S40 The motion upon which the vote was taken was the first censure resolution introduced against the present government Previous votes had been taken on the gov ernments own motions The latest of these was the 464 to one vote of last Jan 29 The applause was still ringing when Churchill left the house Thursday He stopped at the door turned lifted his fingers in the sign and went shals little use for dive bombers The government has been criticized for failure to develop dive bombers but had aid that they uere arriving now from the United States j n The United Slates and Brit ain arc now more closely to gether and more determined to win the war regardless of risks and sacrifice than ever before as a result of Churchills talks with President Uonstvclt on movement of men supplies and ships and replacement of losses at sea King Palmer Hurt in Bicycle Accident DES MOINES R Palmer member of the state so cial welfare board was taken from a hospital to his home here Thurs day after undergoing treatment for a left wrist fracture suffered Tuesday night in a bicycle mishap He sivervcd into i curb and went over the handlebar avoiding collision with a boy alo on a bi cycle Palmers home is in Union Iowa West Vfor Victory back to work Churchills somber portrayal of the war in Africa was relieved only by his statement that very considerable reinforcements have reached or arc approaching the battlefield This major strengthening of the battered British eighth army athwart the axis path to the Nile delta Alexandria and Sue was the basis of Churchills statement that I do not consider the strug gle in any way as decided V This appraisal ot the allied position in Africa and the mid dle cast cvokcil by two days of debate in the house nf com mons on Churchills conduct of the war was given in a speech which also touched upon the prime ministers recent consul tations with President Koosc vclt He said the conversations were concerned only with movement of troops ships and aircraft and measures to be taken to combat losses at sea and more than re plncc sunken tonnage The United States army air force has been in action for some days in the north African strug gle while United States service and supply units have been cn Kaged on behalf ot the allies be hind the battle lirms Almobl everything arranged was secret Churchill added of his talks with the president and there was never a more earnest desire between allies to engage the enemy In the closing passages of his historic reply just before com mons began voting on a motion to censure his government for its direction of the war Churchill said I have stuck hard to my blood toil sweat and tears o which I have added muddles and mismanaccmcnt The war in Churchills opin jon is likoy to be a long one and moreover he said there is no reason to suppose that hostilities will cease when the final re sult has become obvious He paid tribute to the Russian for their steady resistance to   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 155+ million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

10 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 10 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 155+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 155+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 155+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 155 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication