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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - June 29, 1942, Mason City, Iowa                             v I if I NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME COMP DEPARTMENT OF H I STORY ANO A CHI V 3 OE3 MOINCS I A THE NEWSPAPER THAT VOL XLVIII ASSORTED PBH8FUI4 LEASED JASON CITY IOWA MONDAY JUNE 29 ma MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS THIS PAPER CONSISTS OF TWO SECTIONS ONE N0 223 BRITISH FORCES QUIT MATRUH House Report Forecasts 15 Ration Programs FUNDS FOR 19 WAR AGENCIES WIN APPROVAL Committee Slashes Appropriations for Price Administration WASHINGTON UR Ameri cans were warned Monaay in a house report on a appropriation bill for 19 war agencies to prepare for 15 addi tional rationing programs withii the next year The bill providing for opera tion of the agencies during the fiscal year starting Wednesday was approved by the house ap propriations committee Monday morning and sent to the house Tor immediate consideration It was designed as the first sup plemental defense appropriation bill for 1943 Major controversy is expected over funds for the office of price administration which would ad minister tlie rationing programs The only major cut made in the bill was in OPA funds The committee slashed that appropria tion from 3161000000 to 395000 000 and warned OPA not to come back for more It further speci fically prohibited the agency from receiving any more money from the presidents emergency fund OPA Administrator Leon Hen derson told the committee he foreseestheneed for 15 new ra tioning programs in addition to present rationing ot sugar gaso line automobiles tires and type writers The committees report said it would be folly to name the spe cific items likely to be rationed because it would cause immediate runs on them But it added that several of them are in two of the basic cost of living groups which means a general rationing pro gram for the entire country Largest single item in the bill was 51100000000 or the war shipping administration The com mittee reported that the would tise the money to finance the acquisition hire expenses reconditioning outfitting opera tion repair insurance and inci dental expenses of the wartime merchant marine More than 100 vessels will be acquired to add to the present merchant fleet Testimony at hearings on the various appropriations revealed that The army may tie increased to 6000000 or 7000000 men in 1943 after reaching 4500000 by the end of this year This conforms with plans previously announced by Chief of Staff Georse C Marshall but in hear 1 ings on Ihe pending war depart ment bill Lieut Gen Brehon Somervcll said the 4500000 fig ure would not be reached until July 1 1943 2 Thc United States will operate between 2200 and 2600 mer Armored Train Blasts Nazis chant vessels this year in the war effort O The outlookfor the consumer is very bad War Production Board Chairman Donald M Nel son told the committee the full impact total war will not get home to the civilians until fall late A Office of Civilian Defense Di imoupn me mam street rector James M Landis be Stores were flooded and stocks JVCS thn nviu tiriTl v HntiT3rfrti l Bodies of Otto Krumm and Son 4 Are Taken to Elma Funeral Home Krumm 42 am his son Leonard 4 were deai Monday as the result of a ivashou on a bridge approach to the Little Wapsie river 19 miles southwes of here about 11 oclock Sunda light A car driven by Harvey Reid incl carrying nine passengers sanl nto 12 feet of water as it crossed he undermined approach to the bridge Reich Mr and Mrs Krumm and ive of the Krumm children wer Rescued and taken to the home ot rlenn Foxx nearby but Leonards body was not recovered from thc wollen stream until after day ight Monday morning Mr rumm died at the Foxx home bout 1 a m Monday of injuries eceived in the accident county fficials said County Coroner N A Bradley sheriff Percy Haven and Dr V Bockoven were called to the cene No inquest will be hell hey said The bodies were taken o Elma where funeral arrange lents are pending About 12 brid county and about railroad track betiveen in one Hovvarc mile ot Chcstei and LeRoy were washed out Sun day night by rain Boats Rescue 30 at Spring Valley SPRING VALLEY Minn UP Thirty persons were rescued from their homes in boats Sunday when Spring Valley creek rose from its normal depth of a few inches to nearly 14 feet during a torrential rain Streets were inundated by the flash flood with 3 feet of water swirling through the main street heves the axis will bomb the united States to destroy produc tion and to create a feeling of panic and weariness ot war He doesnt think Americans are yellow enough to become pan icky however C About 80000 Japanese arc now located in temporary assembly centers 20000 in permanent re location areas The bill carries money to pay Japanese workers at a rate of a month for corn man labor for semiskilled workers and S19 a month for skilled workers Food shelter clothing and medical care are furnished C The federal bureau of invesU V gation staff will be increased by 998 new agents and 2904 cler ical workers On June 1 the report ssid 66197 of the FBIs 166282 pending cases wore unassigned because of insufficient personnel Buy War Savings Bonds and Stamps from your GlobeGazette carrier boy damaged heavily Rescuers went to several homes in boabto save about 30 persons wnen the water threatened to sweep the houses from their foundations Several other southeastern Min nesota areas were drenched in the ram which began Sunday shortly after noon and continued most of the day 64 Inches of Rain at Decorah By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Wind and electric storms ac companied by torrential rains struckacross Iowa Sunday and bunday night as wind and flash floods caused thousands of dol lars in property damage More than 2 Inches of rain at Atlantic caused retaining walls of Bull creek to give away under mining 200 feet of pavement in the business district An inch of ram m 15 minutes caused Email streams to overflow flooding 3 Car Plunges Into Washout 2 Die 9 WERE RIDING IN AUTOMOBILE Barbara Jean Cooley Fatally Injured When Struck by Car Car Driven iryMan From Plymouth Hits Child Fractures Skull HIGHWAY FATALITY Barbara Jean Cooley 3i year old daughter of Mr and Mrs Glen Cooley 1C27 North Federal avenue died Sunday afternoon of in juries received when she was struck by a car driven by Elmoi Thompson of Plymouth at the in tersection of Seventeenth street and North Federal avenue at 1250 p m Police said Thompson driving south when the girl stepped from thc curb into the path of the ear and was struck by the front right fender Both wheels of the car ran over her She hospital and streets while wind blocked streets with fallen trees and other debris Heaviest rainfall reported was 64 inches at Decorah Dry Run creek which flows through De corah ran bank full for several hours but did not overflow Other rainfall reports included Port Dodge 175 Charles City 330 Dubuquc lOG Forest City 132 loiva Falls 71 Waterloo 00 Cedar Rapids 71 Ole Goodge 45 year old resident of Armstrong was knocked un conscious by flying pieces of wood m islherville Iowa Youth Believed to Have Suffered Cramps Is Drowned DUBUQUE Klein 8 son of Mr and Mrs John Klein Rickardsvillc Dubuque county drowned Sunday after noon while swimming in the north fork of thc Maqudkcla river a short distance from Rickardsville Thc body wax recovered a hort mie later The young farmer nad gone swimming with his oloer brother John Jr 19 and neighboring youth John Han non 17 and is believed to have uffcrcd an attack of cramps taken to a local died shortly after County Coroner R E Smiley the child suffered a severe said skull fracture The victim was born Jan II 1939 in Mason City She is sur vived by her Martha Lou parents a sister brother Robert Lee all at home and by her grandparents Mr and Mrs w M Cooley and Mr and Mrs J S Lloyd from Stahl Mo The body will be taken to Sid ney Alo for services and burial BARBARA JEAN COOLEY F R Extends Rubber Drive for 10 Days WASHINGTON Roosevelt extended the rubber collection drive Monday tor an ad ditional 10 days lions through because collce r Saturday had brought in a disappointinf total of tous Originally scheduled to have mded at midnight Tuesday the ampaign now will continue through July 10 The continuation was ordered upon the recommendation of Secretary Ickcs in his capacity as petroleum coordinator anil William II Boyd Jr chairman of the petroleum industry war council Speaking for Mr Roosevelt Presidential Secretary Stephen Early told reporters In thc face of thc very serious needs for rubber the total collec tions as reported Monday arc dis appointing Hence the continua tion of thc drive The total of 213000 tons was exclusive of rubber turned in since Saturday and also of that in the hands of some 20000 junk dealers in thc country Early said H compares with a total of 100 438 tons collected during thc first six days of thc campaign which began June 15 f V Ickcs told reporters that he thought part of the lack of suc cess of the scrap rubber cam paign was due to hoarding and he said there might even he po Vie in official life who were doing a little hoarding Ickes said he suspected a great deal of rubber could be dug up in public buildings In his own inter ior deportment buildings officials ot the public buildings administra tion recently refused to permit floor mats to be turned in for scrap GIOO TONS COLLECTED IOWA REPORT SHOWS WASHINGTON col lected C100 tons of scrap rubber from June 15 through Juno 27 the white bouse reported Monday Jollcctions by other states in tons included Minnesota 3153 G T SGHMAEHL VICTIM OF FALL Rye and Henkel Foreman Fatally Hurt at Hot Springs S Dak George Schmaehl 817 Massa avenue southeast fore man for the Rye and Ilctikel Con struction companies associated was killed in an accident at Hot Springs S Dak Sunday after noon according to word received here Details of the accident are lack ng but from the meager infor mation received it is believed that Schmaehl was fatally injured in a fall from a cliff Mr Schmaehl is survived by lis wife and a daughter Evelyn Schmaehl The body will be brought home or funeral services and burial The Rye and Henkel concern is engaged on a defense contract near Hot Springs FALL KILLS CHILI CORYDON Two year nlcl Kenneth Gibbs ciicd here Sunday injuries suffered when thc child ell down a storm cellar entrance thc arm d Mrs la f his Gibbs parents h Mr Youths 18 to 20 to Register Tuesday 1INGTON Uncle to thn WASHINGTON ff u n c I c Jam Tuesday will register some 000000 youths of the 18 to 20 agl grouP for possible mili the selective ary service under eivice system When that registration is com ileted the government will have record of about 43000000 men male in the country be ween 18 and 65 years of age Tuesdays registration will be or youths 18 and 19 nd for 20 year olds born be years old aTl 192K and June 922 The 20 year olds arc sub ect to thc draft An amendment to thc selective service law would be necessary before the 18 and 19 year olcis could be drafted Brig Gen Lewis B Hershey se lective service director has indi cated they may be needed The youngsters registering Tuesday will be given the same set of questions already answered by their elders They will be asked their name residence and mailing addresses date and place of birth and their employers name and address There will be no lottery to de termine the classification of the new 20 year olds Local draft boards will simply classify them by the dates of birth Thc oldest will be called first Cerro Gordo county youths will register at nine registration cen ters Mason City 18 to 20 yearolds will register at the courthouse or the school administration building Clear Lake youths will sign up at the city hall Registration places have also been established at thc regular centers in Mcservey Thornton Svvaledale Rockwell Dougherty and Plymouth Regis tration hours will be from 7 oclock in thc morning until 9 oclock in thc evening ASSOCIATES OF SPY SABOTEURS ARE ARRESTED Additional Cache of PayOff Money Found More Arrests Planned NEW YORK WSciure of several contacts and associates of the band of eight nazi spy saboteurs landed by Uboats on the cast coast was announced Sunday night by the FBI which promised more arrests within a lew days New developments in the startling case of the eight Ger man agents submarineborne to Long Island and Florida beaches with explosives intended to wreck vital American industries included the discovery of an additional cache of in cluding tot lf money carried ly uc tciirs to Neither the number nor thc names ot the persons arrested as aides of the invading saboteurs were disclosed by Earl j Connol ley assistant lo FBI Director J bdgar Hoover in announcin thc new roundup 24 hours after Hoover had revealed the capture of the agents bent on a twoyear campaign of destruction1 against the American war effort arrests ot the suspected accomplices were Chica go and some here Those here were believed to have been made from among a group of German people hving On Long Island not far from thc deserted beach at Amagansett where the first group of four nazi terrorists landed June 13 Hoover gave the names of those n this group as George John Dasch leader Ernest Peter Burger 36 in 1S31 was a pri vate in thc Michigan national guard Hcnrich Harm Heinek 33 and Robert Quiriu 34 They came ashore in a rubber boat uilli their store of money and explosives together with lists of key railroad centers bridges and war plants which Hoover said they planned to blow up They also equipped with forKed selective service and social security cards Hoover said Similarly equipped was the group of four which landed at Ponte Vedra Beach near Jackson ville Fla June 17 Hoover said listing these as Edward John Ker ling 33 group leader Herbert Haupl 22 Werner Thicl 35 and Hermann Naubauer 32 We have their full statements of confession Hoover declared We have all the plans they brought with them The plans called for the de struction of among other objec tives three plants of the Alumi num company of America and in dicated that thc missions main attack was to be against the light metal industry which would have delayed Americas allimportant program of airplane production V The FBI did not reveal how the dynamiters were caught An unofficial report was that a lone unarmed coast guardsman on foot patrol along Amagansclt beach gave the alarm resulting in their seizure This version said the coast guardsman who had watched thc German sub surface and the four agents row ashore was seized by them and threatened with dcaiii but later released on his accept ance of as bribe money to keep silent But instead of keeping silent he rushed to his station and turned in the alarm thc report went In Washington Attorney Gener al Bidclle said the department of justice would handle the case swiftly and thoroughly though the question of prosecution has not been settled Some sources pointed out that the saboteurs changed to civilian clothes after coming ashore in uniforms and said that as a result they could be classed as spies and shot Or under the wartime es pionage act they might be liable to prison up to 30 years Since two were classed by the FBI as American citizens U S Bombers Attack Japs on Wake Isle WASHINGTON navy announced Monday that United States bombers had attacked Wake island in the Pacific last Saturday dam aging the enemys air field and various shore installations The navys communique based on reports received up to 1 n m Monday said Pacific area 1 U S bombers t a c k e d Japanese occupied Wake island on June 27 2 Under favorable conditions of weather and visibility our planes attacking in formation damaged the air field and various shore installations X Enemy anti aircraft and fighter defense wax ivcal and although one bomber suffered minor damage during thc attack all of our planes returned safclv1 Tiny Wake island which overwhelming enemy forces wrested from an American marine garrison Dec is Japans nearest base tn the Ila tfaiian area It is 2000 nautical miles west of Pearl Harbor and little more than 1000 miles southwest of Midway tlic American outpost nearest to Japanese territory V Thc raid reported Monday was the second made by American aircraft on the atoll Planes from a task force led by Vice Admiral William F Halscy wiped out shore installations and some minor surface units Feb 24 It was considered probable by authorities here that American raiders on Saturday were lookiii shipping of the a concentration of enemy sort which they found in the Marshall and Gil bert islands raid Jan 31 when they destroyed 1C ships as well as 41 planes and land works f if If that was their hope appar ently they were disappointed since the communique men tioned no damage to shipping Thc blow also was interpreted here as a nuisance raid coupled with reconnaissance activity with thc objective of keeping Wake unusable for the Japanese even though no effort was made to rc uccupy it Thief Takes Spread Off Bed While Man Sleeps GOLDSBOnO Jv Car bold thief walked into the room in which John Cotten was sleeping and stole the spread from Cottcns bed And then Deputy Sheriff Roy Percise said the thief moved a floor lamp from another room into the bedroom to aid him in locating Cottons he also took without awakening his vic tim DIES FROM IXIUKIES NEWTON 111 year bachelor farmer and lifclim dent uortlnveil of here Grolc died Sunday of interim juries suffered last week he fell on a farm gate Kred s the laws of with a possible death their cases apply Weather Report FORECAST MASON OITY Cooler Monday night and Tuesday forenoon Fresh winds IOWASlightly cooler Monday night and Tuesday forenoon Scattered thunderstorms in southeast nnd extreme east portions early Monday night MINNESOTA Scattered sliowers northeast early Monday night Little change in temperature northwest Slightly cooler cast ti south Monday night and Tuesday forenoon IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather Maximum Sunday R Minimum Sunday night 62 At 8 a m Monday 7 Rain fall 201 inches Sundays rainfall brought Junes total up to 5 inches The June av erage rainfall in Iowa from 1873 1939 is 471 inches YEAR AGO Maximum Minimum Precipitation 102 The figures 1or Sunday Maximum Saturday Minimum Saturday At 8 a m Sunday Precipitation YEAK AGO Maximum Minimum 81 64 inches BO THINK BRITISH WITHDREW FOR ANOTHERSTAND Full Scale Clash Believed Avoided When Axis Tanks Are Superior BULLETIN CAIRO The British de fenders of Bum have evacu ated Matruh coastal anchor of the defense line 175 miles west of Alexandria British authori ties announced Monday night The bitterlyfighting army fell back in the third day of a crcat tank battle in which it had sought to stem the drive of Marshal Erwin Rommels armored columns toward he Nile valley and the Sue canal Tim British used the term evacuated indicating that the mam British forces were retir ing in jrood order and fully capable of turning to give Rom mel battle when the time and ground was favorable Matruh was abandoned as the battle a wih melee of men and machines spread over an cvcr liroadeniug battle field south east nf that town By CLYDE A FAKNSWORTII Associated 1rcss War Editor The axis announced Mon day that its forces in Egvpt captured Jialriih Monday mornhijr thus reducing the first of the defense strong holds on the road to the rich valley of the Nile the naval base of Alexandria and the fcmez canal and the British did not deny the claim But indications were thai the allied forces mulclug up the cichlli British army had with drawn to lake another stand in desperate search for positions from which the axis juggernaut could be halted after its im pairment in isolated encase ments ami reinforcement of thc defense Tile Indies seemed o call for avoidance of a fullscale clash with Field Marshal Rommels col umns so long as thc defenders stood under the handicap of in feriority in tanks On one point of thc axis claims there was official British agree ment that RommeVs forces suc cessively by passing Matruhs western and southern defense po sitions in two days of battle had reached around to tiie southeast ern or Nile valley side of Matruh prized railhead 100 miles from Alexandria The Alexandria area was raid ed Monday morning by axis planes but they caused liltic damiifle m no casualties nccorri to tbu official Egyptian re port Berlin and Home said that t Malm Rommel captured more than GOOO prisoners and hat he was continuing the eastward chive A London military commen tator said there was reason In believe Ihal thc British had withdrawn from the Matruh area At the same time the longher alded main offensive of the Ger man armies in Russia was re ported under way in the Kursk area south of Moscow and north of Kharkov where thc enemy appeared to be attempting a wideswinging move to cut com munications between thc Russians central and southern fronts to prepare the uay for a drive into thc Caucasus The full weight of Germanys allout assault in Russia was bearing down on the red armies in both the Kharkov and Kursk areas BR Thus the axis pincers on the middle cast the Suci Canal and Alexandria look shape in the coordinated drives in Russia and Egypt aimed evidently at closing in on thc Suez region and Asia Minor from two di rections through the Caucasus northeast of Suez and through Egypt on thc west Oil the basis of Mondays com munique from thc British Matruh seemed threatened with isolation by land unless the defenders re tained power to cut oft that axis arm or could withdraw from Matruh to a new stand fomewheie I deeper eastward on thc   

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