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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: June 6, 1942 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - June 6, 1942, Mason City, Iowa                             HI NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS HOME EDITION ONTHS MASON CITY IOWA PEARL HARBOR ATTACKED U S sprang to battle sta sprang to battle sta Fall of citadel symbol erf Dec 7 iitd tragedy in For East THIS PAPER CONSISTS OF TWO SECTIONS SECTION ONE Change in civilian life was rapid Industry embarked on giant effort salvage be came patriotic hundreds of items vanished UBOATS HIT HARD Axis concentrated subs to whittle at Americas main problem shipping took dangerous toll like this victim in the Atlantic AXIS STRIKING POWER BLUNTED But Great Battles of Allied Offensive Are Yet to Be Fought WASHINGTON Military experts reviewing six months of global war concluded Saturday thai axis striking power had been considerably blunted since th United Saes plunged into con flict Dec 7 but warned that the great battles for final overwhelm ing victory are yet to be fought Virtually all that Have been done to version of the nation to a ar economy creation of the huge and crowingarmy extension of supply lines to alt parts of thc described as consti tuting only Hie prelude to the Krarid offensives which alone could bring triumph How soon and effectives offensives may be undertaken it was said depends partly on the partly on enemy countermeasures m the present main theaters of conflict In the opinion of some wellin formed authorities however pros poets are that a definite turnine point m he long right bf reached this fall and alreadv here are evidences of fundamen tal changes m the strategic situa tion which suggest that both the Japanese in the Pacific and the Germans in Europe and Africa lost much of the initiative i they appeared to have had y in grasp only a month 01 Possibly tiie most Important of these is that he Germans nave been unable to start any general campaign o destroy but so far have Into seesaw fig i a Russian army that every appearance of beinjf a second iront can be opened Greatest U S Achievement Lies in Production Speedup By DrWTTT By DclVITT MACKENZIE Hide World War Analyst a suc nn tests from whowhiteedh a lieve that the general should be led to view the situa tion as through a glass darkly T The idea is that lhe public will work harder i it believes we gelling a beating Maybe so but this col umi feels that the man in the street thinks soundly enough and that best results are ob tained by ing him the fact And one fact i that we are getting ahead with our job of beatingthe axis That doesnt mean were out of the woods and rompinhome lo victory On Ihe contrary we are on the verge of the bloodiest MACKENZIE urope Meanwhile Germanys spri S AfrJCa to hae been held and industries in Ger many itself are suffering heavily from British bombardment What the Japanese themselves may do in an effort to secure their already enormous conquests m cast Asia and the western Pa cific is a puzzle As some authorities see it now ine Japanese problem in broad strategical terms is a defensive one Flushed with their triumphs in Hongkong he Philippines Ma Isya the Netheriand Indies and Burma they are nonetheless beset by actual and potential enemies on all sides China although admittedly in grave danger in her eastern prov inces still remains as a base from which Japan may be attacked To We north war may shatter the troubled peace between Russia and nussia Japan at any moment To the south Australia has become a mighty fortress against which Japans first major thrust was broken m the battle of the Coral fehtinc Ot the whole war We arc ahnut to measure arras with Hitler in a decisive battle which may open any day There are frightful dangers vet lo be surmounted and if we tloVl intensify olr effort we fel lle csst iwe may be Uncle Sams greatest individual achievement probably lies in pro duction that is in starting from scratch and jn six months making great strides that on May 19 Donald Nelson chairman of the war productions board was able to announce that the united na lons war production was greater tl an the axis m every category mat isnt to say we have caught with ihe axis nations because hey are profiting by years of in tensive effort It dees mean that ue now are set to overtake them we slram every nerve v That is of vast importance be cause as tlis column has sn oflcn insisted this is a war of resources of which production and transportation are an in n SoIJcrs Tnus the worker in the factory md shipyard at home is playing ust as important a part in the defense of his country as is the soldier at the front Failure ot the man at home to produce could vreck our war effort just as as could a revolt of the oldiery So upon the extent of If depends tnc win be With Rood reason we have YANKS DAMAGE AT LEASTS JAP SHIPS KOSTKA TO GIVE AVENGER DAYS OATH SUNDAY Program in Central Park Sunday at 1 p m Clough to Speak Ticut Stan Kostka junior grade former ailAmerican football play er from Minnesota and now sta tioned at the navy preXlight train ing school at Iowa City will give the oath of allegiance to approxi mately 23 men who will be sworn into the navy Sunday Avcnpei Day After the men have been sworn in Lieutenant Kostka will present scrolls to the North Iowa men nifying that they were sworn in on Avenger day at p m six months to the minute after the at tack on Pearl Harbor The mass enlistment cere monies will be held in the Cen tral park beeinnimr at 1 oclock in lhe afternoon completion or the Avenger day program the Avengers will lcaVc for Des Moines to begin active duty in the 113 vy Avenger Day win mark Mason Citys observance in the six month anniversary of the outbreak of war for the United States Men who have passed their pre liminary physical examinations and who will receive the oath from Lieutenant Kostka include Marten J Togerson Britt Melvin J Heanty 725 Jackson ave nue southwest Henry A Koen en Laiimer Wendell F Mil ler Nashua Donald E Park Rockwell Duane T T h a v e r Charles City Harry G Willcox bn Jefferson avenue northwest Richard W Nolda Crystal Lake Edwin E Kugler Sheffield and Harrison Hedgecock 501 Fourth street northeast The localnavy recruiting office accepted 14 men for enlistment arid sent them to Des Moines Fri Word has not been heard day from the Des Moines station but the local office believes the fol lowing men will join the squadron Sunday Harold W Ja cobs Charles City Donald S Jensen Britt Duane V Michel son Britt Earl W Brown R F 2 Mason City Virgil M Blade lanly Paul E Ziegler 209 Nine teenth street southeast Kennetl R Beckman 111 Jefferson avenui northwest and Leonard C Pfef fcrkorn Charles City Merle II Stone Fstherviile Rolhmcl K Sallec Kensetf Frea R Carter Clear Harold W Jacob Charles City Charles R Madignn R5 East state strec and Pete A Kiroff 1021 Tvlci avenue northwest The naval recruits will meet at the posloffce at oclock In the afternoon ana march in a hody to he park accompanied nv the navy mothers and the colors of the V F Spanish American War veter ans their auxiliaries and other patriotic bodies and the state guard Police and the highway patrol will provide the escort Merchants are asked to have the street flags up for the Brick Plant Worker Dies From Fall of theMason City Brick an lile company was found earl Saturday morning after h had evidently fallen from a pip me he was inspecting accordin cittei I invcstgated the ac Coroner R E Smiley said hey had ucen usine a knotted rope in order lo climb into and out of the pit Trebilcocks body was found at he foot of the rope and his skull was frac tured Death was aecidental ac cording to Dr Smiley Trebilcock who resided at 13 Tenth street southwest wa working with Kenneth Tangeii st crane man on thc 6 p m About Tit St he Plant morning 10 inspect the pipe line When li in i r i Velurn Tangen went tu look for him and found him lyjnc in the pit Trebilcocks head en enlly struck a stone in the fall according to officers He was born Oct IS 1919 Mason City the son of Guy an Tincy Trebilcock He was Ployed at the Ulen body work until April 20 1941 when he employment with the Masoi ity Brick and Tile company SurvivinE are his four sisters Mrs TlionitoD Marcelia and Eva Mason city and Mrs Douglas Miller Charles City and firee tooth ers Clyde Jack and Billy all of Mason City Two aunts Mrs Frank Sanford and Mrs Jack Bell Mason City an uncle Emory Wilkins Mason City and nieces and nephews haron and Patsy Thornton and foe Ann and Larry TrcbilcocK Vlason City also survive Funeral services will be held it the chapel of the McAuley ami on funeral home nt 2 oclocl Monday afternoon with the Rev Tarvm Kober pastor of lle First Vlethndbt church in Burial will be at Memorial emctcry The program at the park will include a brief address by R F Clough vocal solos by Miss Ellen Smith and music by the munici pal band A special section of seals will be provided for rela tives of the recruits Lowlands Are Flooded by Big Sioux River SIOUX CITY sudden rise in the Big Sioux river flooded lowlands from Westfield Iowa to Frlday night and threatened to leave scores of families in North Riverside Sioux City suburb homeless IOWA TO HEAR ARNOLD MOUNT PLEASANT Gcneral H If Arnolds com mencement address Monday at Iowa Wesleyan college willbe the first speech the chief of the army air corps has made since return ing from conferences in England Flying Tigers Kill 200 Japs by Bombing Strafing Burma Road CHUNGKING China Flying Tigers of the American vol unteer group fighting in south western China killed more than 200 Japanese soldiers Friday along ihe west bank n the Sal wen river in Yunnan province and along the Burma road by bombing and strafing it was announced of ficially Saturday During the month of May communique added the AVcslmt 24 enemy pursuit planes in aerial combat four more were probably shot down and 5 were destroyed on the ground One enemy bomber three observation planes and two transports also were reported shot down The American flyersalso de stroyed 67 enemy trucks partly destroyed II more and smashed one enemy tank the report said The AVG lost six places pilots were killed and one wounded ihe communique clared f was de BRITISH CLAIM SUPERIORITY IN AFRICA BATTLE Assert Rommel Has Lost Half of Armored Force in Desert War By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Britains desert armies were re ported lo have won armored su 12 of North Africa Saturday as tank ed British infantry striking from three sides pounded thc Germans back toward a Bap i the main British defense lines dispatches said nazi Field Marsha Erwin Rommel had already lost 340 tanks or about naif his armored force British headquarters said British troops launched an of fensive Thursday night west of Knishtsbridge 15 miles south west of Tobrnk amt sustained the attack successfully through out the Friday Military observers said the situation was rapidly boiling to ward a showdown with Rommels nam forces hard pressed in the ulopdy devils cauldron sector east of the gap which his armored columns slashed through the Brit ish minefields between Ain El azala and Sir Haclieim Caught behind this 50 mile line Hommel was said to be counting on using the gap as an escape hatch n the event he is forced to retreat vcstward once more The British said Lieut Gen Neil Ritchie British field com nander was pressing thc initia ive after driving the axis out of ramar of Knightsbridge Heavy British artillery fjre from thc south aim north ham pered axis attempts to organize a counterattack while Uritislt which thrust far to the axis rear attacked German sup Ply lines bringing vilat fuel to Rommels mechanized forces An Italian communique ac nowledged that the British were n the offensive declaring that British armored attacks had been epulsed The German high com mand sad briefly that axis forces ad gone over to the counterat In the Russian campaign an un asy quiet prevailed Saturday over long battlefront as both sides Penitentiary Warden Dies GLENN c HAYNES HAYNESMADE IMPROVEMENTS Left Mark in Many Iowa Fields Formerly Lived in Mason City MADISON o I FORT a renewal of the maneuvered for loody conflict Soviet dispatches again report el only minor nclions in which everal hundred Germans were iiled or wounded Report Ship Sank One Sub Eluded Another penitentiary warden since 1D33 died at his home here early Sat urday after several weeks illness The warden widely known in penal circles for improvements made at the Iowa prison had suffered several heart attacks urine the past year Thc most recent was two weeks ago lie removed to a hospital here then but vas returned this llis homc ust outside the big gray walls of the peni tentiary He died there Soldier hero politician state official good roads macie an indelible mnrk in many fields of Iowa life long before ho toov over direction of the I 350 imprisoned men here He governed with an iron dis cipline horn of military back ground but tempered with an ccptional sense of justice and fair ness that made him revered by virtually all his charges and em ployes Col Hayncs was born in Conter villc Iowa in 1876 He went to liigh school Ihere enlisted in thc bpamsnAmcrican war but failed to see active service Back in his home town he became assistant postmaster later postal inspector headquartering in Washington St Louis and Chattanooga JOSK Costa Rica he newspaper La Tribima aturday thc United Fruit tenas sank one submarine luded another when they icked her in the Gulf said ship and at u nile she was cnroutc to Puerto imon How Ihe ship defended herself as not explained The Atcnas a Tribuna said arrived at uerto Limon somewhat dam Weather Report FORECAST MASON shower and tnundcrstorms Saturday night and Sunday forenoon somewhat cooler Saturday night IOWA Scattered shower and thunder storms Saturday night and Sunday forenoon somewhat cooler in north and central por tions Saturday night MINNESOTA Occasional rain in south and extreme east portions Saturday night and Sunday forenoon somewhat cooler in south portion Saturday night IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics Maximum Friday 57 Minimum Friday night 65 At 8 a m Saturday 74 Rain 26 inch YEAR AGO Maximum JJQ Minimum 54 Precipitation 53 Charged With Stealing 2 Cars for Roundtrip CAFFAEV S Car ttT man was ancstcd here A on a ere on a charge of stealing an automobile at 50 miles away rid nig lo Gaffncy in and stealing another automobile here and re turning to Greenville in it 183 Evacuees to Be Landed at New York WASHINCTOW OJBThe liner Gnpsholm cnroute from Sweden T York 8 Kith 193 evacuees from the Scan dinavian countries the state de partment announced Most of thc passengers are believed to be American citizens of Swedish and Norwegian nationality The liner is traveling under a safe transit agreement with thc axis Joining the army as a private when the United States declared war on Germany Hayncs later was made a captain He went to J ranee in iniG vvjh the IGStli in faiuiy a unit of 111e famed Rain how division He was cited for lie nisunsmshcrt service crosv to Havcry under fire and re ceuetl thc eioix do guerre of r ranee V v He maintained his interest in military matters throughout his life being active in the American Legion and Iowa national guard He served a term as state com mander of the Legion On his return from France after service with the army of occup tion Col Hayncs engaged in the real estate business at Mason City audilotime W1S clcctcd 3latc in 1D23 He also sought the republican nomination for governor and later tor stale senator anrl for many years played a prominent part in lew a politics He served eishl years as sec retary of thc Iowa Good Heads Association and sponsored thc campaigns which played an im portant part in Retting Iowa of tic mud Hayncs was named a brigadier general hi the national guard be fore his retirement in 1936 as commander of the 168th infantry but his title of colonel stuck with nim He became warden of the peni tentiary sept i was Thomas Hollowell who resigned because of poor health Married to Miss Mamie Lane of Cenleryillc in 18S6 Haynes is sur vived by his widow and two chil f i Bruce West of Cedar Rapids and a son Ted of Des Moines Funeral services will he ron t1 ontlil al 2 Pm in Cen icivillc with burial there BELIEVE OTHER VESSELS HIT AS FIGHT GOES ON Spokesman for Says Perhaps 16 or 20 Enemy Ships Damaged Bv EVEKETT K IIOLLES PEARL HARBOR Hawaii UR States naval and air forces Saturday were engaged in i battle somewhere in the Pacific with a strong Japanese fleet ot which at least eight war vessels battleships aircraft carriers and been damaged Thc Japanese had lost the first but thc battle still was underway American ships and planes had rushed to the attack when the in vasion fleet made its first appear ance off Midway island They ad ministered a severe drubbing lo the Japanese and forced their withdrawal but the battle ran out into the Pacific where a cloak of official silence had dropped around it V A spokesman for Admiral Chester W Nimilz Pacific fleet headquarters here revealed lhe total of at least eight enemy shins perhaps any number up to 16 or the haltered Japanese fleet fled from its humilUtliiR and pos sibly disastrous defeat near Midway island f A Admiral Nimisz in an earlier communique had said As move reports come in it ap pears that the enemys damage was very heavy indeed involving several ships in each of the car rier battlesiip cruiser and trans port classes To clear up he use of the word several whether it meant sev eral jn each individual class or among the four categories the spokesman said The communique may be inter jrelod to mean thai more than mship was damaged in each class mentioned Thus with the U S navalair orces continuing the battle nt cast two JapanDse battleships two two aircraft carriers and wo transports have been damaged The disclosure thai thc major enemy fleet included transports made it evident that United Slates navy air force army and marine defense forces had re pulsed a definite Japanese in vasion Midway or even a more vlfat objective One enemy aircraft carrier tint amagcd by icrial bombs was iteistruck by three United Stales ubmarine torpedoes the fight in onunaiuler in chief of thc Pacific lecl announced in one of the mr1 dramatic communiques of the war Reciting the damage to the en emy fleet he continued This damage is far out of pro lhal which ve ecived While it is too early to claim a major Japanese disaster it may bp conservatively stated that United btales control remains firm in the Midway area The enemy appears lo be with l wc are continuing the There was as yet no official indication of Hie destination of the Japanese fleet which United States war forces working in Perfect union had repulsed There remained n possibility tat noth the Alidway attack Thursday andthe Dutch harbor attack Wednesday were diver sions to screen major attack on Hawaii or even the United States inauian coast It so the scheme Nimitzscommunique implied plainly tnnt thc attack had been broken Probably definitely Ordered to Hawaii at the dark est hour of thc war after the ene sneak aUack on Pearl Harbor Praised with the fighting men of the states forces who had won thisgreat success no brunt of thc defense to has fallen upon our aviation pmonne J in which the arm navy and marine corps were all represented he said They added another Fhinin their record of achicve On every occasion when P have met the enemy our officers   

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