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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: May 23, 1942 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - May 23, 1942, Mason City, Iowa                             NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME HOME EDITION THE NiWSFArER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANJ MASON CITY IOWA SATURDAY MAFaT yixx 1UWA SATUKDAY MAY 23 1942 fAfm CONSIST or TTO SECTIONS X KHARKQVJATTLEAT PEAK OF FURY Mason City Gives 122 Draftees Mass ATTACKS nrnnnn nnnim DV lirniminrn BY lYihlnANIZED RECORD GROUP IS SENT AWAY FOR INDUCTION More Than at Bus Station to See Selectees Departure DrafteesListed on Page 10 Mason Cityans turned ou en masse Saturday morning to give a sendoff to 122 selectees leavingfor the army induction center at Des Momes the largest draf group to leave here in Work war II More than 2000 persons tried to crowd into the hus station parking lot opposite the fire station for last goodbyes wtth the men leaving to listen to the music by the Mason City municipal band and watch the American Legion representa tires passing oat ciearets and candy bars to those lea vine They crowded tightly against a cordon formed by the American Legion and Veterans Foreign Wars color guards and police of ficers and pushed back reluctant ly when pictures were to be taken It was not a noisy crowdAnc it was an orderly crowd which moved on direction despite an obvious desire to stay close to those leaving as long as possible Hundreds who did not make V Federal avenue far south as Twentytilth street to watch the three large vilute buses roll past with their cargo of waving manhood Some ot themen in thebuses waved and smiled as they recog nized friends lining the street but other faces lacked the smile The demonstration was the first wartime farewell party in Mason City and followed the plea of the president recently for more music more bandsmore colors and more show for the boys leaving for the army camps Despite the early hour for city people it was voted a very suc cessful demonstration by sponsoring the event The spon sors included the Kiwanis Rotary and Lions clubs Benevolent and Harding lodges A F and A M the American Legion V F W Euchre and Cycle club Knights of Columbus Mrs Hanford Kac Nider Ahepa Bnai Brith Cham cer of Commerce and Elks The V F W and American Legion colors with a color guard 01 service organizations and aux iliaries marched down First street southwest to the bus station at GAO a m to start the day off They were followed by the mu led by Director Carleton L Stewart which struck i 3 iEly iune as lt approached the station and played a 15 min ute concert at tiie loading place Following the music the selec tees were called from the crowd lined up before two of the Jefferson Transportation com pany s buses for pictures and the gifts from the veterans This was j competed shortly after 7 oclock the officers opened a lane the crowd through which the colors and their guards and band could leave Then the J crowd closed in again Soon afterward the task of loading the men began F R Fockler bus station manager commented afterward on the surprising ease of this operation Because of the cooperation of police officers and the crowd L At 73o a m the three buses pulled on to First street southwest turned west to Federal avenue and I then started the journey south I ward headed by two police cars with sirens whining The police cars escorted the buses to the citv I limits There were no speeches some tears some cheers and an obvious i appreciation that the United States 1 s in a shooting war INCLUDE 3 IOWA CITIES M WASHINGTON WBurling tton Davenport and Des Moines K t tte Iowa cities Included in the municipalities at which the Suffice of defense transportation ordered surveys of intercity iTtfbus and railroad passenger travel B as a guide to adjusting passenger Ettravel requirements The 122 selectees for whomMason City staged its first war time mass demon are in the upper pic iuc uuujiica xuciiK which many will leave for army camps The lower pictuie shows AmeiicanLegion representa tives distributing cigarets and candy bars to the men leaT ing and also shows part of the crowd which helped to give them a sendoff The p cture was taken fromone of the upper windows HI the fire station across the street Lock photo Kayenay engraving l Mate Boards Sub Reviles Commander of SuMersible Shouts Injustice You Have Killed Men on That Ship APPROVE PAY BOOST IN ARMY Conferees Agree on Minimum of for Buck Privates Sailors WASHINGTON senate louse conference committee agreed Triday on a general pay increase measure for men in the lower ranks of the armed services to i minimum of 542 monthly This tentatively rejected house attempts to raise the minimum pay of buck privates and sailors to S50 monthly from present minimums of and Senator Johnson D Colo one of the senate conferees said the pay raise as agreed to in confer ence would cost the government about 285000000 additional each year based upon the number of men m the army navy marines and other armed forces on Jan 1 Johnson said elimination of the house attempt to boost this mini mum another monthly would save an estimated on he same basis Senators on the conference committee agreed to accept a house provision that would re quire the war and navy depart ments to report to congress ev ery days on the commission ing of civilians without previous military experience The conference agreement car ies pay increases for all the lower paid men in the armed forces and a base pay increase for second leutenants in the arny and ma mes and ensigns in the navy and oast guard It also carried in reases in subsistence and rental Uowances for officers generally As a possible offset for the S3 eduction from the minimum voted the house Johnson said con ies had discussed a mandatory life insurance proposal At soldiers may have this by aymg monthly premium nd the new proposal would make 325 monthly from each aiding costs at NEW ORLEANS Johansen Vineland N J first mate of a Honduran cargo vessel shelled and abandoned in the Gulf of Mexico boarded the submarine which attacked his ship and re viled the commander for injus tice The officially announced since submarines started operating in the gulf took place May IS One crew man was injured AH others were picked up from lifeboats by a fishing vessel The navy announced the incident Friday The submarine ship crewmen said was apparently of Italian de sign but manned by Germans The ship sighted the submarine about four miles distant in mid afternoon The submersible gave chase and after about an hour overhauled the ship and opened fire with a light gun and machine guns Harry Schlcsinger of New Or leans radio operator of the ship flashed calls for help repeatedly during the chase and attack which ended when the ships captain or dered the ship abandoned After the crewmen had taken to lifeboats the submarine officers ordered the boat in which Johan sen was riding alongside Schles inger said when the boat neared the submarine Johansen jumped to the subs deck and when he got aboard the sub he said This is an injustice You killed men on that ship said the subma rine commander attempted lo take over Hie lifeboat to carry explosives to the ship to sink it indicating that the submarine had no torpedoes Johansen Schlesinser said argued at length with the submarine of ficers to stall for time arid get help The submarine officers sudden y abandoned their plan arid cast loose the lifeboat Johansen jumped into it and the submarine crash dived The ship Schlesinger said was listing and settling when iast seen by crewmen AT DINAPUR Correspondent Tells of Arrival of Chief After Mountain Trek LONDON Exchange Telegraph Agency correspondent reported Saturday from pinapur northeastern India that American Lieut Gen Joseph Stilwell had arrived there with 400 other per sons after a strenuous trek over the mountains from Burma The correspondent said he met General Stilwell who had commanded the Chinese fifth and sixlh armies in Burma while he was eating breakfast with his officer Maj Gen Franklin Sibert Friday and that Gene ralSHhvell talked between month uls of biscuit andcanned cheeseand gulps of j tea froma thermos jug V Stilwell referredlightly to his trip over the mountains We brought 400 with us in cluding an American physician Dr Seagrave from the American Baptist mission Burmese nurses Americans British Chinese Bur mese and AngloIndians he said Many joined in when they found out we had some chow It was a mixed gathering but when we got a little discipline into them they were all right There still are a lot of refugees in Bur ma but I think theyd do a damned sight better by staying there than by facing the toil and privations of the mountain paths He frould not talk about the fighting in Burma or the route he had followed to India but he it IHJ 11 nally admitted that the going was JUKEVT GEN STILWELL at Dinapnr Mexico kicks OnlyAction of Congress to Become Ally Public Fury Sweeps Countryas Sinking of 2nd Ship Is Revealed MEXICO CITY lacked only the formality of ap parently certain congressional ap proval Saturday to become a full fledged ally in the war against the axis Her decision was made rapidly Friday night as a wave ot public fury swept the country over the news that axis submarines had sunk the second Mexican mer chant ship within eight days Even while awaiting Presi dent Manuel Avila Camachos formal proclamation of war the first Mexicos history the republic put precautionary mea sures against axis aliens quiet ly intoforce and took its first military steps A special session of the full cabinet announced after three hours deliberation that congress would be called in special session to authorize the president to de clare the existence of a stateof war Congress must be convened within 10 days but next Thurs day was set tentatively for the PRESIDENT CAMACHO session and there were indications that the aroused public might in sist on a meeting still earlier pos sibly next Monday or Tuesday The governments statement clearly defined the reasons that swept Mexico toward axis sinking of the Mexican tanker Potrero del Llano off Flor ida its refusal to accept a protest of that sinking and then its sink ing Wednesday of the tanker Faja de Oro all within eight days Survivors from the ships still had not reached the capital when war decision was made Friday but a great patriotic demonstration was or ganized to greet their arrival Saturday as the wheels started turning to brine congress back from its recess Government sources indicated the alien control measures would not be announced publicly until they had been enforced fully The military activities also were kept a state secret Even before the announcement that Mexico was declaring war in consideration of the aggression of which the country has been a vic tim there were indications that government departments were ready for swift action to meet war conditions Actine on reports that axis nationals had foreseen such an event and had converted their cash into United States curren cy the export of United States money was forbidden and banks refused to change dollars into Mexican pesos Policemen remained wiihin sight of the largest German business places to guard them from the public Senators and deputies voiced demands that they be seized to reimburse Mexico for the loss ot the ships and pay the families of 21 seamen who died in the sinkings Mexicos entry into the war would place on the side of the al lies a nation ot 20000000 the most populous in LatinAmerica except for Brazil Mexico has a standing army of 70000 and has 400000 more semitrained men ready to be called and a navy of 15 ships already active On patrol in the Pacific Buy war savings bonds and stamps from your GlobeGazette carrier boy IL Weather Report FORECAST IOWA Little change in tempera lure Saturday afternoon through Sunday forenoon MINNESOTA Little change in temperature Saturday afternoon through Sunday forenoon IN MASON CITY GlobeGazelle weather statistics Maximum Friday 57 Minimum Friday night 28 At 8 a m Saturday 55 YEAR AGO Maximum 71 Minimum 40 36 MISSING IN GULF TRAGEDY 2 Axis Submarines Sink Vessel 2 Orher Attacks Are Reported BULLETIN WASHINGTON h e navy announced Saturday that enemy submarines had torpe doed one ship and shelled an other in the Gulf of Mexico Both were small United States merchant vessels Survivors have been landed at gulf coast porls NEW ORLEANS axis submarines torpedoed and sunK a United States passenger cargo ship in the Gulf of Mexico May 19 with 36 missing in the areas worst shipping disaster the eighth naval district announced Satur day The vessel carried a crew of 48 in addition to a six man naval gun crew and eight passengers Be lieved dead were 30 members of the crew five of the gunners and one passenger torpedoes struck the port side of the blacked out ship at 2 a m A third torpedo hit 30 sec onds later on the starboard The first torpedo destroyed the radio room and killed five ot the nun crow Six lookouts lulled to see the Uboats One of the underseas raiders surfaced later but made no attempt to rescue the survivors Bugler Finds Made in Jap on Ho im TWIN FALLS Idaho Orm Fuller company bugler for the Twin Falls unit of the state guard took a deep breath and pursed his lips as he raised his trumpet But he stopped shorf On the in strument he read Made in Japan The company now has an Amencan made bugle after skip ping the calls for a few days SAN FRANCISCO San irancisco grocer complained to the office of price administration that his ladder was too short to post his prices on the ceiling Besides he added his cus tomers were getting stiff necks ihe OPA advised him that the posting of ceiling prices didnt necessitate pasting them on the ceiling of the store HEARING IS SCHEDULED LEMARS Frank Scholer of Plymouth county said a hearing would be held May 27 to determine the degree of guiit following a plea of guilty Friday by Vivian Hamil 47 Kingsley tav ern operator to the recent fatal shooting of his wife Vclma UNITS CLAIMED Reds Assert Repeated Stronger Nazi Tank Assaults Are Crushed By JOE ALEX MOKRIS United Press Forcicn Editor The battle of Kharkov reached a new peak Saturday with the red army reporting defeat of many powerful German counterattacks and the nazis claiming that the axis had seized the initiative with a twoday offensive v Both Moscow and Berlin in dicated that the huge mechan ized slugginff match was near a decision but there still was no definite information to show which might gain the upper hand and thus win a vital spring hoard for the Summer campaign on he Ukraine front On the Russian side dispatches from Moscow said that soviet riflemen ridingon tanks and pre sumably using the twoman antitank rifles had aided mobile artillery and airplanes in crush ing repeated and stronger nazl tank attacks especially on the southern flank where 15000 axis troops were officially reported killed in three days In one engagement typical the action since the Russians broke through German outer de fenses before Kharkov was an attack by 150 axis tanks that dug a wedge between soviet positions Russian riflemen on tanks swiftlyswung behind ike tacking forces and the artillery units shifted in a half circle to catch the enemy between devas tating cross fire and knock out 75 vehicles before the others re treated hurriedly f Other dispatches said that the red army still was on the offen sive and that troops had broken into another fortified place before Kharkov in a heavy battle at close quarters On the German side a narl communique said that the Russian attacks on the Kharkov front had Jailed completely with heavy losses and that axis forces had taken the offensive The Berlin radio said that the outcome of he battle might be decided over the weekend and that important an nouncements were expected early next week Nazis Put Masses of Men in Battle By ROGER D GREENE Associated Press War Editor German Field Marshal Fedor von Bock was reported throwing masses of airborne troops into the bloody 12 day battle of Khar kov Saturday and for the first time the Russians acknowledged reverses on the southern flank despite a toll o 15000 Germans killed there in three clays A bulletin from Adolf Hit lers field headquarters made the familiar claim that the Rus sian mass attacks on Kharkov the soviet Pittsburgh had col lapsed completely Meanwhile DNB official Ger man news agency reported that a powerful French naval formation was roving the western Mediter ranean DNB said a British destroyer which left Gibraltar Friday after noon sighted the formation a battleship two cruisers and siv destroyers and put back into port Such a force might have como from the French Mediterranean port of Toulon Conflicting claims marked the battle of Kharkov with the Rus sians insisting they still held the initiative The nazi command said the Russian offensive started IMay 12 with 20 infantry divisions perhaps 300000 three cavalry divisions and 15 ar mored brigades Suffering the heaviest blood and material losses the enemy was jompletely broken up the communique said The German counterattack which started May 15 led into the rear of the strongest enemy group and has cut through this line of supplies This apparently referred to von Bocks Hanking thrust SO miles below Kharkov For two days now German Rumanian and Hungarian troops   

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