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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: April 18, 1942 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - April 18, 1942, Mason City, Iowa                             DEPARTMENT OF COUP PTM NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME THI NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS VOL XLVIII MASON CITYjfoWA SATURDAY TWS PAPSH CONSISTS oWO RAF BLASTS AT NAZIS IN LONG DAYLIGHT RAID Augsburg Site of Sub Engine Works Heavily Damaged in Assaults LONDON HAF striv ing to hammer Adolf Hitlers new Europe out of shape sustained its longest daylight offensive Satur day with fresh waves of fighter planes while London assessed re sults of bold smashes into Ger many and conquered territoiy within the past 24 hours A factorscredited with pro duction of half of Germanys submarine engines the big Diesel works at Augsburg was heavily damaged at dusk Fri day informed sources said al though the RAF paid a high price for this deep thrust into zuziland The Augsburg raid was charac terized here as one of the most daring flights of the war and was the RAFs farthest daylight pene tration of the reich Once ovei their target the raiders dived to chimney height to hammer home their blows Britains new Lancaster bomb ers about which little is known except that they are four motored earned put the Augsburgsmash The tons set many a new fire in Hamburg during the night the 89th raid on that important German port Saturdays communique on ihe Augsburg raid contained the first operational mention of the Lancasters Last month Air Sec retary Sir Archibald Sinclair called them the most formid able bombers in existence and said tliey were coming into service in increasing numbers Spitfires and Hurricanes were hurled back across the English channel Saturday for new fighter sweeps of the battered occupied French province of Pas de Calais CEBU OCCUPIED BY JAP FORGES Corregidors Guns Silence More Batteries on Bataan Peninsula WASHINGTON war department reported Saturday that Corregidors guns silenced several additional enemy batter ies and blasted roads and bridges on the nearby Philippines Balaan peninsula disrupting Japanese communications Siege fire continued throughout Friday a communique said but its intensity increased somewhat and little damage was declared to have been done on Corregidor Cebu the islands second city has been occupied by the invad ers the war department said re ports indicated The city was re ported to be burning but fighting continued on the fierce island of the same name on which the city itself is situated On the island of Panay also in thecentral Philippines enemy in vasion forces meanwhile were being vigorously opposed by the defenders the communique said Chinese Cheered CHUNGKING Word of the bombing of Japan spread through this Chinese war capital Saturday with a profoundly ex hilaratmg effect and was cheered as the best news of the war Now they are getting their own medicine said Chinese who have had their own homes battered by Japanese bombers Official quarters withheld com ment pending further reports FACES SENTENCE ST PAUL Minn R Lee 56 father of Figure Skat ing Star Robin Lee Saturday faced a term oi up to five years in prison for his confessed knife attack on Elizabeth Birch March 20 Lee a former figure skating instructor pleaded guilty to an assault charge F R Creates Manpower Commission WASHINGTON Roosevelt Saturday created a nine man war manpower commission headed by Federal Security Ad mmistrator Paul V McNutt will broad powers to bring about th most effective mobilization anc maximum use of the nations man power in the prosecution of the war An executive order setting up the commission also reorganized the ar production boards labo division into a labor production division bringing directly I o WPB chairman Donald Nelson in rormation and recommendation relating to production problems ii which labor is concerned Hlllmanpresent directoi of WPBs labor division was ap pointed special assitsant to the president on labor matters and will assume his duties as sue shortly This position was de scribed as similar to that held bj Harry Hopkins on lendlease arid munitions allocations In addition to McNutt the other members of the man power com mission will berepresentatives o the war navy agriculture and la bor departments the new laboi production division of WPB chair man Nelson of the WPB the selec tive service system and the civi service commission Requisition Cargo Ships WASHINGTON war shipping administration has re quisitioned all essential ocean going tankers and dry cargo ves sels owned by American citizens Admiral Emory S Land adminis trator announced Saturday The announcement said the action affected several hundred vessels The government already has taken title to or is using 75 pei cent of U S freighter tonnage The general requisitioning was ordered under the merchant ma rine act of 1936 which says Whenever the president shall proclaim that the security of the national defense makes it advis able or during any national emer gency declared by proclamation of the president it shall be lawful for the maritime commission to requisition or purchase any vessel or other water craft owned by citizens of the United States or under construction within the United States The war shipping administra tion recently created by Presi dent Roosevelt has taken over functions of the maritime com mission in directing the operation of the American merchant marine Claim Driver Was Taunted About Slow Speed One Is Killed ST PAUL Minn thorities Saturday investigated an automobile accident in which one youth was killed and three others injured two of them critically Floyd Gervais 15 was killed in stantly when the car in which he was riding crashed into a pole The driver Jerome Tima 18 and Richard Toskey 14 were in jured seriously Robert A De Bruycker had told them Tima was being taunted about driving too slowshortly before the accident They said he stepped on the ac celerator and drove on to a park way to miss another automobile at a street intersection Raids on Japan Not Based From China CHUNGKING was earned on most reliable authority Saturday night that Saturdays air raids on Japan were not based in China 4 BELIEVED SAFE INTERNATIONAL FALLS Winn persons missing since they set out across the ice of Lake of the Woods to deliver mail last Tuesday were believed safe Saturday A K Romaine Umneapolis assistant inspector of he civil aeronautics commission nghted them as he flew over Oak sland 50 miles north of Warroad Imn Contrasts in Tokio is H6 stnlciules aie found in Tokio Above is shown the Marunouchi building m1ny are light wooden houses often wisteria draped as shown in the above Tokio street scene Weather Report FORECAST MASON CITY Occasional rain Saturday night and Sunday forenoon Slowly rising temper ature Fresh winds IOWA Occasional rain in most nf the southwest and extreme wen portions Saturday afternoon very slowly overspreading the remainder of the west and south central portions Saturday night and Sunday afternoon Slowly rising temperature in east and central portion Fresh winds MINNESOTA Somewhat warmer Saturday night occasional rain extreme southwest Saturday night verly slowly overspread ing southwest and extreme west portions late Saturday night and ijunaay forenoon IN MASON CITY lobeGazctte weather statistics Maximum Friday go Minimum Friday Night 36 At 8 a m Saturday YEAR AGO Maximum Minimum Precipitation 33 71 53 54 British Jubilant LONDON jubiia lon over the first air raids on Ja aan was splashed Saturday across he front pages of early afternoon lewspapers And Now Raid by Allied Planes said a twoline Banner in Lord Beaverbrooks vening Standard which pub shed a large map of Japan with ts story of the raids ALFRED HERTZ DIES SAN FRANCISCO Hertz 69 composer and conductor oted for interpretations of Wae crian music died Friday TURN PASSED IN WAR OUTPUT But Caution Is Added by Nelson Who Urges Harder Work Than Ever NEW YORK Uniied States has passed the turning point in war production and the output of the united nations Sat urday exceeds that of the axis is the statement of Donald M Nelson chairman of the war production board We can see daylight ahead in our whole war production effort he told the American Society of Newspaper Editors Friday night Nelson coupled his optimism with caution however pointing out that todays production fig ures do not mean that we are going to win the war next month or that ue can start out tomorrow to take an offensive During the next year or so we are going to work harder and sweat more lhan ever before in our lives he said but we can see ourselves working toward vic tory It is safe to predict that by the end of the year the allies shall have overcome the accumulated built by JaPan since 1930 and by Germany since 1933 Nel son told the editors From then on he added we shall have our enemies at an increasing disad vantage The editors close their conven tion Saturday with an ofithe record address by Lieut Gen Hugh A Drum commanding gen eral of the eastern defense com mand and the first army and a demonstration of chemical war fare service on Governors island Buy uar savings bonds and stamps from your GlobcGazcllc carrier bov OFFICIAL URGES PEOPLE TO AVOID PANIC Identification of Planes Comes From Reports Broadcast by Japs By ROGER D GREENE Associated Press War Editor Warplanes bearing the United States insignia bombed Tokio and at least three other great Japanese cities for the first time in his tory Saturday strewing death arid destruction across an 800mile trail in a bold daylight assault that stirred bitter outcries from the Japanese people The raiflers striking at high noon dropped fourpound in cendiaries and highexplosives m the industrial suburbs of the capital and also attacked Yoko hama Nagoya and Kobe Tokio reports insisted that only schools hospitals and residential sections were hit and that the damage was slight No fell in Tokio itself it said buttwo capital theaters cancelled their matinees While the Japanese bitterly as sailed what they described as indiscriminate bombing the Tokio radio quoted a high Japan ese official as urging the populace ibecome panicky uges of bombs for more than two lull years If we lose our com posure the Americans and Brit ish will clap their hands and laugh at us said Namoru Shig emitsu Tokio foreign office ad viser Imperial Tokio headquarters said the possibly operated from U S aircraft car riers lying hundreds of miles off small incen diary bombs in the Tokio vicin ity and asserted the missiles were not capable of causing serious damage The Japanese command ac knowledged that the surprise as sault sprang airraid alarms through three of the four main islands of Japan Nine planes were reported shot Admit Fires Damage and Casualties U S Navy and Army Officials Silent TOKIO From Japanese AP Al lied battle planesidentified here as American swooped upon the TokioYokohama region with fire and explosive bombs for the first time Saturday and tear of their lethal cargoes prompted air raid warn ings across more than 800 miles of the Japanese arch ipelago hes of Honshu Japans major island Shikoku which nestles in the lower arm of Honshu and Hokkaido to the north were under alerts or the bombsights of the raiders tor hours Japanese announcements disclosed Fires casualties and damage were left in the wake of the squadrons from which it was authoritatively announced that nine planes were shot down Broadcasts in Japanese Chinese and Eng lish reported the details A Chineselanguage announcement said American down indicating that the attack ers were in considerable numbers Even a 10 per cent loss is consid ered high and on this basis ns many as 90 planes may have taken part in ihe spectacular foray All reports on the raid came from Japan ivilh Washington official quarters silent for many hours presumably to guard against giving information to the enemy regarding the base or bases from which the planes operated Identification of the planes jt Tokio broadcast which American planes raided Tokio for the first time bombing hos pitals dropping bombs on the Tokio suburbs where there are no military objectives But residents houses and schools Tokio is the worlds third largest city with a population of 7000000 Bicycle Route Woman Is Reported Wanted MIAMI Fla signs of the times A dairy advertised for bicycle route woman The woman is needed because so many men have gone to war and the bicycle with i trailer carrying 150 quarts of milk uses less rubber than a truck Lindy Paid a Year Plus Allowances DETROIT OTLcharlcs A Lindbergh as a technical advisei at the Ford Motor companys bomber plant is being paid a year plus allowances A Fore spokesman said the famous flyei could have written his own tick et but preferred pay equivalent to that of a colonel in the army ah corps reserve a rank from which Lindbergh resigned last fall is Buy war savings bonds and stamps from carrier boy your GIoIieGazclte Japs Feel Sting of Invading Bombers the raiders ffew oirplanes Thfs might mean that the crews were from the United States However Americanbuilt croft hare been assigned to British Dutch Australian and Chi nese forces as well as to so viet Russia technically a neu tral in the Pacific war The imperial family safe a communique said The enemy planes ap proached from several direc tions said a communique of Emperor Hirohitos imperial headquarters Bombs dropped also upon Kobe seaport of GaOOOO which lies miles below Tokio and the manufacturing center of Nagoya ihe home of in between Warnings sounded as well in sev eral other areas of Honshu the mam island of the Japanese archi pelago Central defense headquarters announced two planes bombed Nagoya and n single craft sprinkled incendiaries over Kobe n declared no serious damage was caused Fires broke out in the wakn of the planes Authorities said incendiaries ivcrc dropped at six places in the vicinity of NaRoya and at three places in Kobe The flames ivcrc said to have been brought under control The enemy strafed farming ages m the Wakayama and xokkaichi Stiga prefectures with machineguns but no damage was caused central defense head quarters said A Tokio dispatch to DNB the oerman news agency said the capitals air raid warning lasted about seven hours The Berlin radio reported that 3 an or2n unannounced destroyed more than 400 buildings and killed or injured a considerable number of persons n Ogum in northern Japan ft was not known whether that dis nster had any connection with the aids United States war and navy departments had no immediate romment M i I i t a ry observers however have considered mass onslaughts by air against the flim ily constructed strategic centers of Japan an essential preliminary of the allout drive to clear the nvaders from the southwest Pa cific Secretary Stimson said Fri lay that the U S army would be ready for the offensive soon lokto radio announcers al ternating Japanese and Eng lish broadcasts as serted thit nine raiders were destroyed that a number of bombs ivcrc dropped but that toe total of damages and cas ualties was slight if Axis capitals habitually mini mize the effects of allied thrusts   

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