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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: April 1, 1942 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - April 1, 1942, Mason City, Iowa                             NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME DEPARTMENT OF ARRIVES VOL XLVIII ASSOCIATED PRESS AND UNTTW HgSSFUU LEASED VIRES THE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS MASON CITY IOWA WEDNESDAY APEILTIfl42 PAPER CONSISTS OF TWO SECTIONS SECTION ONE TO SECTIONS NO 147 2 INDIA GROUPS REJECT CRIPPS PLAN Chinese Troops Escape Jap Trap at Toungoo FALL BACK TO NORTH LINE IN FIERCE BATTLE Japs Gain Complete Control of Air West Flank Situation Grave By ROGER D GREENE Associated Press War Editor Hardfighting Chinese defenders of Burma were reported to have escaped a Japanese trap at Toun goo Wednesday falling back to the north after the fiercest battle of the whole Burma campaign so far Toungoo 155 airline miles from Rangoon was the eastern anchor the allied line in central Burma Frontline dispatches said remnants of the Toungoo garri son originally estimated at 10 000 Chinese against 18000 Jap anese slashed their way through enemy lines crossed the Sitting river under pointblank fire and scattered in the woody hills Jo make contact with a Chinese re lief army Five thousand Japanese were reported killed in the bloody five day siege ot the town Chinese losses were not disclosed but many fought to the death in shal low machinegun and rifle pits under incessant divebombing assaults and enemy artillery fire On the Britishheld western flank the situation was equally jactoipwl forces were holding Shwedaung 10 miles south of Prome on the road to the west Burma oil fields after a fierce battle with British and im perial Indian battalions A communique further conceded that the Japanese had gained com plete control of the air and that British patrols along the Irra waddy river had been forced to withdraw to protect their right flank against enemy infiltration Allied Flyers Hit at 2 Jap Bases MELBOURNE Australia United States and Australian bombers operating in the face heavy tropical storms struck de structive new blows at two Japa nese bases north of this continent Wednesday A communique said it was be lieved six enemy planes were de stroyed on the ground six others were damaged and many fires and explosions were touched off by Australian bombers which at tacked Koepang on Timor while an allied force scored numerous hits with heavy bombs on an air drome runway at Salamaua New Guinea This continuation of he aerial offensive by Australias defenders came on the heels of an official recapitulation listing 33 enemy planes as put out of action in three days Four were reported destroyed 18 probably destroyed and 11 including four firing boats machine Kunned in a previous raid on damaged All these attacks were made without loss to the united na tions air forces There was growing optimism among the Australian observers that the Japanese now can be held off in New Guinea although they wre cautious not to overempha size the enemys recent with drawal from the inundated Mark ham valley Nevertheless they said the withdrawal means that Japans hold now is confined to the nar row coastal strip where her posi tion may be made precarious The vital point in these informants view is that the Japanese now cannot disperse their was seen as a prime goal of the march into the valley The arrival of the ivet season which lasts three months was accepted as the chief cause for the withdrawal but it was be lieved also that heavy air blows struck at the invaders shipping and planes were another factor The New Guinea correspondent of the Sydney Sun citing the Jap anese failure to raid Port Mores by for the last six days declared that the invaders had been forced on the defensive in that area While he also stressed the ene my s heavy plane losses he point ed out it wouid not be wise to accept the present lull in offensive action as any indication of a col lansc Japanese striking power Nations in New Pacific War Council WASHINGTON new Pacific war council representing seven united nations actively fighting in the Pacific theater met for the first time Wednesday in what members said afterward a tremendously valuable con fe Seated around a white house cabinet table with President Roosevelt were officials of Aus tralia New Zealand China the Netherlands Canada and Great Britain Dr T V Soong Chinese for eign minister told reporters We will be getting to grips with the whole situation more and lore To a question whether he re ceived any encouragement regard ing his own countrys problems he replied that the emphasis was on the overall war effort rather than on the interests of any single lation The participants indicated that ir Roosevelt acted as presiding officer and did a large portion of the talking Lord Halifax the British am bassador representing Great Brit am said there was a general ro view of the war situation by the president and various points were considered and discussed He said the meeting was most helpful and that meetings would be held with reasonable regular ity The next was scheduled for Walter Nash New Zealands minister to the United States and also her representative on the Pa cific council asserted that it was atremendously interesting and valuable meeting BothNashand Dr Herbert V ivatt Australian minister of ex ternal affairs agreed that their countries had had a full oppor inity to express their views and id not been subordinated in anv way Evatt said the conference provided a very satisfactory be ginning t Kansas Patrolmen to Turn Back Any Japs Trying to Enter State TOPEKA Kans ff Gov Payne Earner Wednesday ordered Kansas highway patrolmen to turn back any Japanese trying to enter the state We dont want them here he said The governor acted after noting reports of Japanese concentrations across the states western border in Colorado He said it was feared some of them might try to filler into the Arkansas River valley ir rigation area Buy your defense savings stamps from your Globe Gazette carrier boy or at the GG business office APOLOGY MADE FOR ATTACK ON YANK HOSPITAL Nipponese Halted in Fierce HandtoHand Fighting in Philippines WASHINGTON war department reported Wednesday that the Japanese in a heavy at tack on the right center of Lieut General Jonathan M Wain wnghts line in Bataan captured some of the advanced positions but were halted in fierce handto hand combat before they reached the mam AmericanFiliDino line A number of minor air raids on Corregidor occupied Tues day a communique said and antiaircraft artillery shot dawn two heavy Japanese bombers A formal apology was received from the Japanese imperial higl command in the Philippines fn the recent bombing of a base hos pital in Bataan A Japanese anm spokesman said in a radio broad east that the bombing was unin tentional The text of the communique ro cased on reports received up to a in eastern war time tl Philippine theater Japanese infantry opened a heavy attack on the right center of our line at about 8 p m Marc 31 Several waves of assaul troops supported by heavy mor tar fire made repeated attacks on our outposts Some of our ad vanced positions were taken afte fierce bayonet fighting Ou troops were reinforced and afte several hours of savage handto hand combat the enemy attacl was brought to a halt before i reached our main line A formal apology was made oy the Japanese imperial high command in the Philippines for the aerial bombing of our base hospital in Bataan In a radio broadcast a Japanese army spokesman declared that he nombinjr was unintentional The enemy made a number of minor air raids on Corregidor and our rear areas in Bataan during the daylight hours of March 31 Most of these attacks were made by flights of two planes The HGth air attack on Corregidor was brought to an abrupt end when the two heavy Japanese bomb ers engaged in the raid were shot down by our antiaircraft artillery at about 5 p m March 31 2 There is nothing to report from other areas RETURNS TO IOWA CITY IOWA CITY Her bert C Weller former University of Iowa speech instructor arrived here Tuesday to act as a supply and accounting officer al the lavys prcflight training base lere fort Bragg Practices 5 beneath a netting of camouflaKe is a eter rifle at Fort Bragg N Car This gun shown ar s gun sown bemg operated by the 36th field artillery can hur a p ro lIeS Thc gun is drawn of 75 Wherc Ships Clashed in Far North Barents Sea BERLINL NAVAL STRUGGLE IN NORTH LOOMS Escorts for Convoys to Russia Increased British Sources Report LONDON circles warned Wednesday that Germany would make a desperate bid to shut off the allied Arctic supply Ime to Russia and indicated that British heavy fleet units were guarding the Norwegian coast from which big German ships might leave to join the attack It was intimated that the greatest naval battle of the war might be fought off the north west Norwegian coast If the SoOOO ton German battleship Tirpitz and other big German ships based at Trondheim sought to break to the open sea A spokesman admitted that Britain had been farced to increase escorts protecting convoys of American and British supplies to Russia in expectation of German attacks Informants said that with the lengthening days of spring and the approach of the great spring campaign on the Russian front fiercer and more effective attacks might be expected on the allied envoys by German surface war ihips submarines and airplanes TAKElAPSTO MANZANARGAMP Special Train Carries 500 Evacuees to New Internment Center LOS ANGELES hun dred dolllike babies to elderly climbed aboard a special Irain Wednesday for the governments new internment center at Man zanar The greatest mass movement in the nations history was officially under way By the time the evac uation is over six weeks or so lence the government estimates that 139000 Pacific coast Nippon ese will be relocated in inland areas there to pick up the threads of heir lives interrupted when bombs fell on peaceful Hawaii Without exception the evacuees Ecemed philosophically happy Several said that reports from vftnzanar where advance contin jenls of Japanese tradesmen went last month to prepare the site have described the pleasant con ditions there Evidence of wealth were seen in IVedncsdays group Luggage for ihe most part was modern Six members of the Hori family winch owned a large department itorc were first aboard the train Order Classifying of Men Who Registered on Feb 16 Draft Headquarters Says Some Probably to Be Inducted in May WASHINGTON service headquarters announced Wednesday that men regis tered Feb IB would be imme diately classified and some prob ably would be inducted into serv ice in May or June There had been some confusion as to whether the Feb 16 regis trants would be integrated with men who registered prior to that date or be called after exhaus tion of all previous registrants but Wednesdays announcement said Local boards throughout the nation were instructed to start classification at once of the sev eral million men who enrolled on Fen 16 and to prepare to fill the armys June call for men and possibly the May call with these registrants and resis trants from Hie first age group V The announcement explained that men who registered Oct 16 1940 and July l 1941 constituted me group which was referred to n the memorandum to local boards as the first age group with those who registered Feb 16 being re ferred to as the second age roup The war department the an nouncement said has indicated hat beginning June 1 1342 requi sitions will probably call for men of botli age groups The memorandum said that lo cal boards which had not com ilctcd mailing of questionnaires o registrants of the first age roup should continue to mail hem but at the same time the ocnl board will proceed lo mail Questionnaires to registrants of he second ape group in sufficient lumbers to insure the filling of he June call estimated not lo ex ceed the call of February 1942 entirely from the third rcgistra ion if such action is required Local boards were dircclcd to proceed to complete classifica tion of registrants of tic first sroup and at Ihe same time proceed with classifica tion of those in the second age Kroup in sufficient numbers o insure the filling of the June call entirely from the third reg istration if such action is re quired If any local board finds it does not have a sufficient number of men from the first group available in class 12 to fill its Way call it was authorized to call enough men from the second age roup to fill its quota and was told o continue to classify men in the econd age group to be sure that it lias enough by June 1 to fill a normal call The paragraph referring to calls from both groups said The war department has in cheated that beginning June 1 1942 requisitions will probablv call for men of both age groups In such event it will be necessary to lay calls for the month of June 1942 and for subsequent months on both age groups In those local boards where the first age group is exhausted by June 1 1942 calls will of necessity be made only upon the second age group The precise method which will be fol lowed for the filling of calls for the month of June 1942 and for subsequent months as between registrants in the first age group and registrants in the second age group will be made thu subject of a subsequent memorandum Men between 21 and 35 years of age inclusive registered Oct 16 1910 Those who reached 21 years of age between Oct 1G 1940 and 1 1941 registered on the latter date and on Feb 16 those who had not previously registered hut who were within the ages of 20 and 4S years were listed Panamanian Ship Sunk 13 Crewmen Rescued NORFOLK Va and numb from exposure 13 crewmen of a torpedoed Panamanian mer chant ship were landed at Nor folk Saturday night by a rescue vessel which nicked them up after 45 hours adrift on the stormy At lantic ocean in one lifeboat and two rafts Two crew members were known dead and 38 were presumed lost the filth naval dis trict said Wednesday in announc ing the sinking of the medium sized ship which occurred early Thursday night Weather Report FORECAST MINNESOTA Warmer Wednes day and Wednesday night scat tered light showers beginning in west portion by Thursday fore noon IOWA Somewhat warmer Wed nesday afternoon through Thurs day forenoon MASON CITY Warmer Wednes day Wednesday night and Thursday forenoon Lowest temperature 34 IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics Maximum Tuesday 40 Minimum Tuesday night 24 At 8 a m Wednesday 29 YEAR AGO Maximum 50 Minimum 29 at Plan School on Civilian Defense Work DES MOINES civilian defense training school sponsored by the Iowa industrial and defense commission will be established at Iowa State college as a step in a statewide program to prepare owans for home protection Commission Secretary Rodney Selby announced plans Wcd lesday for the instructors school t Ames which will be conducted 11 cooperation with the Iowa de partment of the American Legion Details of the training pro cram arc still lo he worked out but tentative arrangements call for the school to open May 18 under the supervision of the en gineering extension department of Iowa State college Jt will be a short course extending for at least a week possibly for two Sclby said The program calls for training nstructors at the short course and these instructors in Uirn will re turn to their respective commu nities to train citizens there in protective measures Local defepse councils will sponsor t h c instructorstudents In addition to the general instruc tors to be trained the school fa cilities will be available for rep resentatives of various industrial groups and municipalities Tiie short course be repeated as long as there is a need for train ing instructors Sclby said the Inwa American Legion has been granted per mission by the national office of civilian defense to send two nersnns to the national school at Texas A and M college and these men wil begin their train ing April 5 They wil be Lindon J Murphy Ames member of the Iowa State college extension staff and Alvin Hodoval Oxford Junction na tional defense chairman ot the Iowa department of the Legion Murphy and Hodoval will form part pf the staff at the instruc tors school at Ames and it will be supplemented by officer personnel from seven til corps army head quarters at Omaha and by tech nical instructors on the college staff li S SHUTS OFF ARGENTINA AID Must Give Preferential Treatment to Powers Breaking With Axis W A S H I N G T O N United States has shut Argentina off from the special economic military and naval aid granted Latin American countries until such time as she takes her place in the hemisphere front against the axis The decision an authoritative source disclosed Tuesday was in new policy of giving line with preferential treatment to Ameri can republics which have sonc to war or severed relations with the axis The nine nations that have de clared war and the nine nations that have cut relations have ex posed themselves to axis attack the authority explained hence he added they must have all the economic aid and military and naval materiel the United States can safely provide them Because of the situation nothing remains for the other Latin American countries At the present time the official id Argentina still maintains re lations with the axis and is failing lo contribute in any effective way to the defense or security of the veslcrn hemisphere Until and un less Argentina pulls her share of the hemispheric defense load it will be impossible to send mili ary or naval supplies lo the Buenos Aires government Chile the only other Latin American nation that has not yet will gel broken with the axis modified treatment in regard to military and naval supplies it was staled This is because of Chiles long coastline and because navy is smaller than that of gentina her Ar Cant Fool em OMAHA cant fool lot of people on April Fools day no sir Approximately 500 persons passed by an old plug hat on the sidewalk of 16th and Farnam streets in downtown Omaha Wed nesday without giving it a single kick Then J jr Roncka succumbing to curiosity lifted a corner of the hat and pecked underneath He found a dollars worth of de fense stamps P S Yes it was a reporters idea for an April Fool story OTHER REPLIES NOT EXPECTED BEFORE FRIDAY Hindu Warrior Caste Fears Proposal Puts Them at Moslem Mercy BULLETIN NEW DELHI of India s most important minority groups rejected the British pro posals for postwar dominion status for India Wednesday the extremist Hindu organization Mahasabha joining Ihe Sikhs in registering a negative response The working committee of the Mahasabha announced a deci sion that the proposals were in acceptable a few hours after the Sikh all parties committee had turned thumbs down NEW DELHI India Sikh allparties committee one of Indias minority groups issued the first flat rejection Wednesday of Britains offer of postwar do minion status for India The Sikhs a Hindu warrior caste rejected the plan as sub mitted by Britains special en voy Sir Stafford Cripps on the grounds that it would leave them at the mercy of tile Mos lem majority in Punjab prov ince As a result the Sikhs were ex pected to make common cause gainst the Moslems with the Mahasaba organization of Hindu extremists whose rejection of the offer aready had appeared cer tain The Sikhs who al the census numbered 4335 000 are a warrior race who seceded from the mam body of Hinduism and were taught to worship one cod observe morality and practice tiie use of arms Their principal seat is the Punjab in northwestern In dia where they fought two wars asni5t be British until their sub jeciion in 1813 Sillcc lhcn h nave won fame as some ot fie em pire s fiercest fighters More than i000000 Sikhs now Ive in the Punjab alone where Hey arc outnumbered more than i y lho and more han i to 1 by the Hindus The chief stumbling block to acceptance was the requirement that Indias wartime defenses be left m British hands Without both in supplies and military guidance India would be virtually defense less against a Japanasc onslaught from nextdoor Burma where al British and Chinese forces have been steadily losing ground It appeared likely that Sir Staf ford would not have the final de cisions of all the major Indian groups before Friday The con gress party working committee whose stand is the most import ant was drafting its reply but i was not knoxvn when it would be handed to Sir Stafford The Mahasabha and Ihe Mos lem Icifftic adjourned tlirir ex ecutive sessions until Friday when both arc due to announce their verdicts A lastminute slimmer of hope was seen however in joint state ment of Sir Tcj Bahadur Sapni and Dr Mukind Ramrao Javakar spokesmen of Indias nonparty leaders who said it would be a tragedy if the Chipps mission failed for it would produce a keen sense of disappointment and frus tration and provoke antagonim which in our opinion would be disastrous in this hour of crisis Although urging that Britain compromise somewhat on the de fense issue the leaders said Brit ain s proposals make it clear tlmt after the war India will not have to struggle for recognition of it constitutional and international status Alternate Plan Is Drawn Up By JOHN R MORRIS NEW DELHI India possibility pf unfavorable reaction in the United States Wednesday delayed completion of a statement by leaders of the allIndia con gress explaining why they are compelled to turn down Bri tains offer of postwar dominion status for India Possible repercussions abroad particularly in America were re ported considered by the con gress working committee in the drafting of the answer to the British proposals brought here by Sir Stafford Cripps British cab inet emissary The leaders of the congress were said lo be studying a plan drafted by Mohandas K Gandhi and Jawaharlal Nehru as an al ternative to Britains offer The congress plan was believed lo reject implicitly Britains pro posal because it insists on Brit   

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