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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - March 20, 1942, Mason City, Iowa                             7 G J 0 H W NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME COM s i rt MOUSE ocs VOL XLVIII ASSOCIATED PRESS AND UNITED PHKSS FUli LEASED WIRES flVK CENTS A copy THE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES AU NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS MASON CITY IOWA FRIDAY MARCH 20 THIS PAPER CONSISTS QV TWO SECTIONS SECTION ONE F R ORDER MAP RELIEF OF BATAAN MacArthur Told to Form Offensiv WOMAN ADMITS HIDING BODY IN CELLAR TRUNK Mother of 3 Says She Acted After Threat to Home of Daughter ATLANTA Ga gray haired mother three children maddened she said because the good name of her daughters home was threatened Friday confessed that she murdered a pretty 22 year old housewife in angry haste then leisurely disposed of the body by hiding it in an automobile trunk in her basement The mother Mrs T E Grif fin 46 signed a long confession in which she said she beat Ulrs Mildred Seymour Williams to death with I dont know what after a heated quarrel in the Griffin home last Nov 21 Mrs Griffin who withstood 24 hours of questioning by police finally broke down and sobbed the story of how Mrs Williams had gone to her home and de manded that she quit telling people that I sm running around with your soninlaw That made me so mad that I hit her with the handle of a broom she said Mildred ran down the stairs to the basement I ran after her In the basement hit her with J dont know wSiatv i I I hit her several times Then she fell and I tied her up I stuffed her into the flunk The distraught husband P M Williams who collapsed at his wifes graveside Thursday said he hoped that Mrs Griffin gets the chair He had searched frantically through the south for his wife after she disappeared but said he was not surprised to Icarn that Sirs Griffin had confessed the slaying When I learned where they found Mildreds body I knew what had happened he said He 3s roome until she charged that his wife was attempting to alienate the af fections of K D Hubert Mrs Griffins soninlaw an allegation which he denied heatedly They moved next door to an apartment he said and continued to live happily there until the morning of Nov 21 when his wife left home to go to her job at a shoe store That was the last time Vie saw her alive he said Churchill and Curtin Debate Duty to Be Assigned Casey Crisp Exchanges Mark Argument Over Best Use for Australian CANBERRA Australia long distance controversy be tween Winston Churchill and John Curtin head ot Australias labor ite Australias minister to Washington Richard G Casey in the middle was being aired Friday A summary of crisp ex changes between the prime min isters was Issued Friday in ad vance of a white paper prom ised for next Wednesday which will contain full documentation of the argument over the best use to be found for Casey Churchill wanted him to be minister of state in the middle east for the British war cabinet a representative of the united kingdom there in all but strictly military matters Curtin wanted him to stay in Washington where j he said Caseys contacts had made him most valuable to Australia and his replacement most diffi cult n Tf X If e to Push to Philippines niCHARD G CASEY said they had lived happily omers in Mrs Griffins home YOUTH ADMITS THIRD MURDER Organist Admits He Killed Grandmother as Well as Parents LOS ANGELES Fred Rogers 24 year old church organist told officers Friday he killed his aged grandmother Mrs Sophie Spiegelmann as his parents well Rogers was charged with mur der after he related just two weeks ago that he chloroformed his mother Mrs Lillie Rogers 44 on Feb 14 1941 and caused the death of his father Courtney C Rogers 50 last Oct 215 by firing their home Both deaths originally were recorded as suicides TDeath of Mrs Spiegelmann 76 had been attributed to foot poisoning In a postmidnight questioning Deputy Sheriff Larry Carmack told Rogers he had obtained a court order to exhume Mrs Spiegelmanns body at San Diego We can go through with this and will find out just why she died Carmack said What do you think we will find Yes I did kill grandma Car mack quoted Rogers her I poisoned Carmack said Rogers knew his grandmothers property two houses in San Diego and 5500 cash would go to him or his mother He said Rogers later got the money which he used to study the organ and got the property after his mothers death Since Rogers was charged with killing his parents friends of the family reported Mrs Spiegelmann died under mysterious circum stances on Dec 6 1935 Churchill acording to the sum mary of the prospective white paper said he first learned that Casey was eager for a change vhen he spent a night with the minister aboard train on his visit to the United States ast Decem ber and January Curtin sayinr that Casey never had intimated to him or any other ready for a shift had asked Churchill not to make the offer The appointment of the hand some mustached Australian to the middle east post was an nounced first in London Thurs day This caused a stir at Can berra followed by such a reluctant yielding on Curtins part that Churchill cabled an expression of surprise at the tone and sub stance of Curtins reaction The affair eclipsed the war in the Australian press Friday near ly crowding the conflict and Mac Arthur from the front pages The Melbourne Herald said the public reaction to theCasey ap surprfseVshock and disappointment If it is riot altogether too late the matter should beremedied Stockholm Dispatches Report Nazis Ready to Quit Kharkov Reds Claim Nazis Have Slain 30000 Civilians in Soviet Pittsburgh By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Adolf Hitlers Ukraine armies were reported in Stockholm dis patches Friday to be making hasty preparationsfor a retreat from Kharkov the soviet Pittsburgh with the city in flames as nazi demolition squads blasted military stores and oil supplies Against this picture of a major new reverse for German arms Hitlers field headquar ters asserted that Russian troops driving into the Donets basin east of Kharkov had been thrown back after a HEW at tack and suffered heavy casual tics Soviet dispatches Thursday said the Germans had slain 30000 civilians in Kharkov but there was no direct word from Mos cow on the progress of military operations against the big steel center of 833000 population which the Germans captured last reports on e is sag Oct 24 Unofficial Wednesday said red army shock troops were fighting in Kharkovs suburbs Stockholm advices said great fires were burning in the city and that it was obvious the Germans whole upper Donets line is gmg to the point of collapse London reports said 500000 German troops were believed based in the Kharkov area In thc north soviet frontline dispatches said the Russians had recaptured an important de fense center from survivors of Ihc trapped German 16th army Staraya Russa sector 120 miles south of Leningrad W Tass the soviet news agency captdred documents showed the beleaguered nazis were ex hausted and suffering from lack of food with the daily ration in some cases reduced to lentil pottage Kharkov was identified a the new headquarters of FicJd Marshal Gen Fedor Von Bock who was transferred from the central to the southern front by Adolf Hitler two months ago The soviet information bureau said Russian troops killed hun dreds of Germans to recapture three more settlements on the southwestern front although it did not specify thc localities It reported 2500 Germans were slam in 48 hours of action re cently on the Leningrad front The Moscow radio announced capture of an important road junc tion on thc Kalinin front north west of the capital TurkishGerman relations were evidently in for discussion at Adolf Hitlers war headquarters German Ambassador Franz von Papen left Ankara Thursday night to report to his chief London cir cles have suggested Hitler was seeking permission to send troops across Turkey a move that might be aimed either at Suez or the Caucasus JAPS ASSAIL U S BRITAIN Nipponese Threaten to Reciprocate for Extreme Warfare TOKIO From Japanese Broad Japanese navy charged Thursday that the United States and Britain since the start of the war in the Pacific had waged extreme warfare based on retaliation and hatred and de clared that Japan would recipro cate Alleging that Japans foes were employing tactics in dAregard of international law the navy pro mulgated an ordinance revising its warfare regulations which it said were based on the London declaration of 1009 and precedents of international law The precise nature of thc revi sion as well as the specific charges against the United States and Britain were not given WKLLES DOUBTS WORLD WILL ACCEPT CHARGE WASH INGTON cling Secretary of State Welles ex pressed doubt Friday that the world would take seriously a Jap anese charge that British and United states forces have been unduly ruthless in their methods of warfare The Japanese government should know Welles commented at his press conference that if there are any nations in the world which have shown complete dis regard for the rules of warfare and the precedents of interna tional law then Germany and Japan certainly fall into that cat egory In other quarters the Japanese charge was viewed as a backfire of propaganda to obscure the atro cities of which thc Japanese them selves have been accused repeat edly STILWELL PUT AT HEAD OF US FORCE IN INDIA Declares We Wont Be Satisfied Until Yanks Chinese Are in Tokio CHUNGKING States Lieut Gen Joseph W Stilwell announced Friday he had been placed in command of all U S forces in China India and Burma and promised that we wont be satislied until we see American and Chinese troops in Tokio together W Stilwell recently made chief of staffto Generalissimo Chiang KaiShek allied supreme com mander in the China theater Pledged that everythine Clitna needs to help her war effort will be furnished without reser vation President Roosevelt has ex pressed his determination to use all means necessary to clear China of the Japanese he told his first press conference J am unable to go into details as to just what help or equipment is on the way but you may assume from the fact that I have been assigned to com mand any United States forces m China Burma and India that the effort contemplated is large The United States meansbusi ness andwe wont be satisfied unjtl nese troops in Tokio together Stilwell had just returned from an inspection trip to the British Chinese positions in Burma where he commands the fifth and sixth Chinese armies Stilwell warned against impa tience while the united nations arc mustering their forces for the in evitable counteroffensive There is a greai deal of work to do first and there are mistakes to be repaired he said The American commander said he American volunteer group flyers would be used to protect his Chinese troops in Burma and added that one of my bluest worries is to get adequate air support for those theyll get it He said their discipline was splen did He described the Chinese sol dier as one of the best in the world If he has the equipment and supplies no one can lick him As for the Japanese We knew the Japanese were a lot of savages and we knew they were not afraid to die We were rather surprised by their initial successes but cool consideration shows that the probabilities were in favor of such successes In the United Stales we were too dumb to see through their in tentions and now we arc paying for it We realize they are a dan gerous and aggressive enemy but where they have been met by anything like equal strength they have been licked Second War Powers Measure Is Sent to F R for Sinature Made Escape 21 Years Ago WASHINGTON W Congress sent to the white house Fri day a second war powers bill giv ing government agencies addition al authority for war purposes The bill grants power to Requisition machinery and tools for war production Extend priorities to tools and machines as well as material Penalize priorities violations with a fine of 510000 and a one year prison sentence Regulate motor carriers and water carriers in the same way as railroads Coin fivecent pieces of mixed silver and copper thus diverting nickel to arms production Examine books and accounts of all war contractors including sub contractors Free postage is provided for the services Parttime federal em ployes such as airraid wardens are exempted from the Hatch act ban on political activity The senate completed congres sional action on the bill Thursday by agreeing to elimination com pensation benefits for civilian defense workers who arc injured while on duty The first war pow ers act adopted in December re enacted many statutes of the last war including espionage laws MAY BE SHORT OF MEN IN WAR PLANTS IN FALL FR Says Plans Not Ready for Allocation of Manpower to Jobs WASHINGTON Roosevelt suggested Friday a pos sibility that there might be some Clarence Arters 53 was questioned at Philadelphia detective headquarters where he was arrested on charges of having escaped from an Iowa state prison farm 21 years ago ARTERS GOES FREE ON BAIL Man Who Escaped From Prison Says Hes Paid for PHILADELPHIA A mod ern Jean Valjcan was at liberty in nominal bail Friday thanks to thc generosity of a stranger while Gov Arthur II James of Penn sylvania waited for submission of the record beforedeciding whether to order his return to an Iowa prison farm from which he fled 21 years ago The stranger Edward F Davis an electrician pledged his home as sccurit5 for S500 bond after reading in newspa pers how Clarence Arters S3 had married reared six chil became a respected member of the community after his escape frnm the Fort Madison farm in 1921 Arters a steward aboard a tanker plying the sea lanes of war was arrested Monday as he stepped off the ship after a voyage through submarine infested wa ters Fingerprints identified him as the almostforgotten Iowa fu gitive A deputy warden from Iowa testified at a preliminary hearing that Arters escaped after serving 18 months of a one to five yenr sentence for theft of an automo bile The prosecutor the public de fender the courtroom specta tors and even the ral lied to Arters defense and sup ported his plea lhal he had than paid for his one mistake For his own part Arters said he would not fight extradition but would waive all formalities be cause he wanted to get it over with But after hearing thc full story Judge Byron A Milner in j definitely suspended thc ma chinery of the law and permitted thc man to go free in bail war pro shortages of labor for duction by next fall He told a press conference that until that time there probably would be enough o r le mon for the tasks assigned But he said plans are not yet ready for a sy s temalic al location o la bor to war in dustry under a manpower moROOSEVELT bilization program Reporters speculated that the new draft registration ordered for men 45 to 64 on April 27 might be for the purpose of listing persons available for war work Thc chief executive said however he did not know how these registrants might fit into war plans The president brushed aaide a request for comment on moves in congress to JUtstatutory 40 hour week restriclfons during the war saying that probably he had fewer ideas on thc subject than his questioners He did volunteer however figures supplied to him by Don ald Nelson the WPB chief which showed that in many industries as weli as in individual plants the work week was in excess of 40 hours or nearly up to it in indus tries operating around the clock He said Nelson had given him figures or February w h i c h showed these hours per man per week on the average In blast furnaces operating four shifts a day 398 hours in thc smelting and refining of copper lead and zinc also on a fourshift basis 39G in foundry and machine shops machine tools 55 air craft frames 487 shipbuilding 482 explosives 449 engines of all kinds including turbines and en gines for planes 511 As for individual plants the compilations showed an alumi nium plant with an average of 582 an ammunition factory with 661 and a machine tool establishment with 17 From the human point of view Mr Roose velt commented 77 hours of work seems a bit too much Buy your defense savings stamps from your Globe Gazette carrier boy or at thc GG business office Weather Report FORECAST IOWA Rain changing to snow in west portion Friday afternoon and in east portion Friday night Colder Friday night and in west portion Friday afternoon Fresh to moderately strong winds MASON CITY Rain Friday after noon changing to snow and cold er Friday night Lowest tem perature Mason City 30 Winds becoming stronger late Friday MINNESOTA Moderate rain or snow south and cast light snow northwest portion Friday after noon and Friday night some what colder fresh to strong winds south and east portions IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics Maximum Thursday 47 Minimum Thursday night 37 At 8 a m Friday 40 in 15 inch YEAR AGO Maximum 43 Minimum 20 Curtin Lauds CoOperation of Americans By FRANCIS McCAllTHY CANBERRA Min ister John Curlin told me Friday night that the United States plans to use Australia as the spring board for an allied offensive against Japan In the first interview lie has given to an American correspond ent since start ot the war Curtiu revealed that President Roosevelt agreed to appointment of Gen Douglas MacArthur as supreme commander in Australia almost as soon as Curtin proposed tlie move Curtin declared that it was only natural that Australia should turn to America for aid in view of Great Britains in volvement in other theaters of war The slim grayhaired Austral ian prime minister paid tribute to Americas military cooperation with the commonwealth and said the closest contact already has been established He said MacArthur arriv ing at Melbourne Saturday and would come to Canberra imme diately Discussing President Roosevelts prompt action in agreeing to sending MacArthur to Australia Curtin said British acqi AUSSIES SNIPE AT JAP FORCES IN NEW GUINEA Japanese Warplanet Are Driven Off After Raiding Port Moresby By ROGER D GREENE Associated Press War Editor Gen Douglas MacArthur dis ciosed Friday that President Roosevelt had ordered him to or ganize an American offensive against Japan for the primary purpose of relieving the Philip pines while on the action front opening shots were fired in the battle for lower New Guinea Vif Dispatches from thc embattled island said Australian forces had begun sniping at Japanese in vasion columns driving down toward Port Moresby only 300 miles from the Australian main land Japanese warplanes twice raid ed Port Moresby again Friday but were driven off alter strafing the airdrome Turning back to the time of Munich Curtin asserted that in the defense proposals drafted by the late Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain the dominions did not ligure in major things That state of mind he said continued even after Munich and when U came to the point of decidingbetween he defense needs of nonEuropean parts of the empire and the dominions there seemed to be danger llat Britain might overlook the de fense of the latter V Curtin asserted that lie was fully cognizant of the total nature of the war and hat the Pacific theater was not the whole show but my paramount duty is to de fend my own people Cvirfin discussed at some length the thorny issue of the action of Prime Minister Winston Church ill in naming Richard G Casey Australias minister to Washing ton to the war cabinet as min ister of state assigned to Cairo I have nothing for which I wish to reproach Churchill he said I dont know how that idea got around However lie said he regarded as surprising the speed which Churchill found necessary in carrying out the appointment He said he also found it sur prising that Churchill should insist on the appointment in the face of Australias reluctance He said he did not regard the transfer as propitious at this time but that Caseys decision to Replying to a question he said i cept thc position was a purely j L he had heard only 0 minutes bePErsoral one fore that workers at the Bethlehem A11 us a shipbuilding yard at San Franchi Churchill co had offered to work on Sundays free and he remarked he thought it was a grand thing DEFERMENT STRESS WILL BE ON TYPE OF JOB Brig Gen Lewis B Hcrshcy forecast Friday that the matter of deferment from military service would shift from the question ot how many dependents jou have to what job you are doing as Presi dent Roosevelt suggested there would be Jabor shortages for war work by fall Hershcy director of selective service spoke to thc conference on war demands for trained personnel as the president told his con ference that plans were not yet ready for a systematic allocation of labor to war industry under a manpower mobilization program Parachute Jumper George Hopkins Jumps Fast Into Matrimony FORT BENNING Ga Parachute Jumper George Hop kins has jumped into matrimony jumped almost as fast as he leaped to the top of Devils peak in and faster than he got down from that mountain Ger aldine Howard of Fort Worth Texas came here last week on a visit Hopkins now a para trooper at Benning promptly pro posed and was accepted The couple was married Saturday and now Mrs Hopkins has gone back to Fort Worth to tell her mother about the swift romance admire the brilliance he said although we sometmes have doubted the wisdom of some of thc decisions he has imposed and feel that some of them have been dictated by political rather than strategic con siderations Thus thc campaign in Greece was opposed by Australia because we felt it left thc left flunk of Aorth Africa open Subspqucnt events proved we were correct He said he able to under stand thc puzzlement felt by many people when they saw reinforce ments pour into thc British isles which lie said he felt were hardly in danger of any imminent in vasion Australia he said is loyal to the mother thc loyalty is to Britain rather than to British individuals TOIIN CURTIN chief able them to disperse their own aircraft in the face of intensified battering by the allies The Berlin radio relayed Tokio reports that the Japanese were within 200 miles northwest of Port Moresby without opposition That invaders about 70 miles up the valley from the coast town of Lae one of their original beachheads Authorities predicted that the fighting on New Guinea might develop as in the early days of the Malayan campaign when the Australian imperial force am bushed sniped and delayed the enemy drive In his first interview since his spectacular dash from siegebound Baaan peninsula General Mac Arthur declared The president of the United States ordered me to break through the Japanese lines and proceed from Corregidor to Aus tralia for the purpose as I under stand it of organizing an Ameri can offensive against Japan The primary purpose of this is the relief of thc Philippines I came through and I will return Thus in crisp terms General MacArthur served nojice on Ja pan that the Ions weeks of al lied defensive dis heartening retreats in Malaya and the Dutch East soon be ended Highranking United States and Australian army officers conferred with Australias army minister Francis Forde paving thc way for an allied war council which will assume basic control of all military operations Thc council was expected to in clude General MacArthur the new united nations supreme com mander in the southwest Pacific LieulGen George II Brett U S A Deputy Supreme Commander Vice Admiral Herbert F Leary chief of allied naval forces in the AustraliaNew Zealand theater and leaders ol Australias fightme forces Other cheering news came in a promise of allied offensive action against Japan herself by Lieut Gen Joseph Stilwell U S A who declared in Chungking The United Stales means business and we wont be satis fied until we sec American and Chinese troops in Tokio togeth er Stilwell recently appointed chief of staff to Chinese General issimo Chiang KaiShek allied su preme commander in the China theater said he had been placed in command of all U S forces in China India and Burma British military quarters said Chinese troops were continuing to harass the Japanese advance in Burma toward Toungoo In thc critical battle for the ap proaches to Australia Australian minute men drafted from the civilian population were reported peppering Japanese invasion for ces marching against southern New Guinea A Japanese air attack Thurs day upon Darwin north Aus tralian military and naval base killed two persons and wounded seven or cieht others Austral ians sail Trifling damage was reported in further raids upon Tort Moresby where one bomber was reported heavily   

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