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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: March 6, 1942 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - March 6, 1942, Mason City, Iowa                             NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME OCPABTMCNT OF jmoay AND ARCH VOL XLVIII ASSOCIATED KIESS AND UNITED PUIi LEASED THt NEWSPAPER THAT MAKIS ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS MASON CITY IOWA FRIDAY MARCH 6Tl942 THIS PAPER cos oTWO SECTIONQkE JAPS CAPTURE BATAVIA PUSH AHEAD X A i THINK BAY RAID UPSET PLAN OF JAPS IN BATAAN MacArthur Sees Nippon Order to Filipinos as Fear of Native Uprising WASHINGTON war department reported Friday that the success of the Subic bay ail attack announced two days ago was believed to have dislocated Japanese plans for immediate re newal of the offensive against Gen Douglas MacArthurs forces and that enemy activities in the last 24 hours in Bataan were neg ligible The department said also that a Japanese army order di recting Filipinos in occupied areas to surrender guns and blade weapons of every descrip tion was interpreted by MacAr thur as indicating that the in vaders were afraid of a popular uprising The text of the communique number 137 based on reports re ceived here up to a m east ern war time 1 Philippine theater Enemy activities during the past 24 hours were negligible It is believed that Japanese plans for an immediate renewal of the of fensive were disclocated by our successes in the Subic bay air at tack A copy of an order Issued by 5 the Japanese armyjnthePhilip t pines which has MacArthurs headquarters directs the Filipinos in occupied areas to surrender guns and blade weapons of every description including ornament and utilitarian knives and trophies This order would operate io deprive the Filipino of his bolo which while sometimes used as a weapon customarily serves as a tool It is univer sally used as an industrial and agricultural implement With his bolo the Filipino farmer builds his house fences his stock and harvests his crops Hence if he surrenders his bolo he will find it difficult to earn a livelihood This order is interpreted by General MacArthur as indicating that the invaders fear that the increasing resentment of the na tivesmay develop into a popular uprising against the Japanese 2 There is nothing to report from other areas In a sudden atack on March 4 MacArthurs small air force caught the Japanese off guard and de stroyed three large ships two smaller ones damaged several small vessels and set fire to sup plies including munitions on the docks in Subic bay just north of Bataan peninsula The ships destroyed totaled mor than 30000 tons and Mac Arthur reported that they were believed to have been loaded with troops several thousand of whom apparently drowned during the attack Mooney Labor Leader Who Spent 22 Years in Prison in Historic Court Fight Dies WOULD BOOST LIMIT ON DEBT House Committee Backs Move After Morgenthau Makes Statement WASHINGTON house ways and means committee unani mously approved Friday legislation to increase he federal debt limit from to the rec ordbreaking total of 5125000 000000 The action came quickly after Secretary Morgenthau had testi fied that the treasury expects to run out of borrowing power be fore the end of next month and haci expressed strong opposition to any forced savings plan at this time to obtain revenue Bay your defense savings stamps from your Globe Gazette carrier boy or at the GG business office Weather Report FORECAST IOWA Warmer in east and cen tral portions Friday afternoon and extreme east Friday night becoming colder in most of the western portion by morning Occasional light rain in extreme east portion scattered light showers elsewhere changing to snow flurries by morning MASON CITY Scattered light showers Friday afternoon and Friday night Not much change in temperature Lowest temper ature 27 MINNESOTA Occasional light rain or snow south snow occa sionally mixed with sleet north portion Friday afternoon and Friday night colder west and central portions by morning strong winds beginning Red River valley early Friday after noon extending over entire state Friday night IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics Maximum Thursday 44 Minimum Thursday night 31 At 8 a m Friday YEAR AGO Maximum Minimum 36 36 23 22 yet jijiu ouii rianciijco pren bombing died in St Lukes hospital here early Fridav The greyhaired Mooney released in 1933 from San Quentin prison where he had grown old under went his fourth major abdominal operation last Monday He was beneved recovering sat isfactorily only Thursday but at a m Friday he lapsed into unconsciousness and died at 225 a m His sister Anna and his brother John were at the bed side Mooney and Warren K Bill ings were convicted respective ly of first and second degree murder in the Market street Wast which killed 10 persons and injured 40 President Wilson intervened and Mooneys deatii sentence was commuted to life imprisonment the same sentence Billings had received Throughout the years Mooney fought for freedom contending he was framed by perjured tes timony because of his activities as a labor organizer Labor and other groups clam TOM MOONEY ored for his freedom and his case before the United States su preme court four times He was pardoned Jan 7T 1939 by Cali fornias new democratic gover nor Culbert L Olson In his 22 years behind San Quentin walls Mooney became a cause celebre of militant labor throughout the world a political issue the subject of legislative debate the center of congressional investigations the imprisoned hero of mass meet in oneof the most remarkable legal rec ords in American court history Then an obscure labor leader Mooney on July 22 1916 was catapulted into international prominence by the explosion of a homemade bomb which burst be hind a line of spectators as the SpanishAmerican war veterans marched along Market street in the Preparedness day parade The explosion killing 10 and injuring 40 transformed the crowd into a mob howling Hang the Within five days Mooney his wife Billings Israel Weinberg a jitney bus driver and Edward F Nolan labor agitator were ar rested all on murder charges They were tried separately ex cept Nolan who was not brought to trial Billings only 22 was convicted but because of his youth was sen tenced to life imprisonment Mooney was convicted and sen tenced to death His wife and Weinberg were acquitted Labor throughout the world took up Mooneys cry Demon strations bordered on riots in Rus sia already in the throes of revo lution President Wilson appealed for clemency in the interest of in ternational affairs Finally when the U S supreme court refused to act Gov W O Ste phens commuted the death sen tence to life imprisonment Mooney then began a light for complete exoneration and free dom He appealed to every court within legal reach to five gover nors to the legislature to con gress repeatedly to the highest court in the land Invariably the answer was no But Mooney never gave up hope He rejected all suggestions that he apply for a parole and split with Billings when the latter sought a parole as the only means of freedom Mooney felt that to request a parole would be an ad mission ot guilt Court records became so volu minous their weight was counted in tons Governors except of senators representa tives the California assembly all recommended a pardon Meantime Mooney had found time while peeling potatoes in the prison to keep alive the fires of his fight for freedom as a martyr of labor In 1937 he entered the political campaign from behind the walls urging with letters and pamphlets the election of Olson as governor Olsons election was a spiritual victory the only one in Mooneys Jong fight which paid a definite and freedom If M One of the new governors first official acts was lo sum mon Mooney and grant him his unconditional pardon With it the governor admonished Moo ney Io uphold peacefui demo cratic principles Mooney prom ised to support democracy His first public speeches strove for worker solidarity and the uni U S MISSION IS SENT TO INDIA Explore Possibilities of American Help in Setting Up Supply Base WASHINGTON fP The United States is sending a mission to India the state department an nounced Friday to explore the possibilities ot American help in creating a great supply base there for the united nations Personnel of the mission was not disclosed but the announce ment said it would proceed to In dia as soon as possible In a statement emphasizing the great importance of Indias stra tegic position and natural re sources the department expressed hope that this step in American Indian collaboration may serve to make an effective contribution to the success of the united nations in the war against aggression Police Save Tires Force 3 Arrested in Raid to Walk to Jail WILKESBARRE Pa Strict orders to the police depart ment to conserve automobile tires brought these developments Three persons arrested in a raid were forced to walk to jail be cause detectives refused to call out the patrol wagon All radio cruiser cars were equipped with that officers can sweep the streets clean of glass after traffic acci dents NORRIS CONDITION GOOD WASHINGTON WThe con dition of Senator Norris Ind Nebr was described by naval hospital attendants Friday as very good The 80 year old veteran legislator has been in the hospital since Saturday for a periodic checkup and rest Buy your defense savings stamps from your Globe Gazette carrier boy or at the GG business office Newest Steel Monster for U S GUARD DUTY TO BE PERMANENT Military Police Battalion to Be Assigned to Guard Vital Points The provisional military police battalion of guardsmen which 21 Cerrp Gordo county men will join at Camp Dodge next week will be on per manent duty Capt Charles E Van Horn reported Friday After undergoing at least four weeks of basic military training at the camp near Des Moines the men will be assigned to guard duty at vital points throughout the state the local officer said The men from the local com pany of the state guard who are going to Camp Dodge are Captain Van Horn 1st Sergt Carl Neider man Sergt Bernard H Reynolds Corp Charles W Newell Samuel Vician Gerold Suter William A Adams Oscar F Fewins Hilding Frid Donald H Johnson Gerald E Kepley William E Laupitz John A Malferow Donald D Peters Earl G Potter Ernest L Spurgeon James E Stevenson John L Szymeczek Marion J Waggoner Jr Earl W Wilkins and Darroll E Wilson All are from Mason City except Laupitz whose home is at Rockwell Captain Van Horn Sergt Nei derson Potter and Spurgeon are veterans of World war I while Corporal Newell was recently mustered out of the regular army Eleven of the others national guardsmen are former Big Ten Directors Reduce Cage Schedules CHICAGO Ten ath letic directors voted Friday to re vise the 15 game conference bas ketball schedule reducing the University of Chicago to nine and other schools to 13 conference games to accommodate contests with service teams U S Withdrew Big Bombers From Java Because of Lack of Fighter Plane Protection why the united nations lost control of the air in the battle of Java By HAROLD GUARD United Press Staff Correspondent Australia UP United States heavy 4 were removed from nf hst weekend by American airmen because of fighter prLcHon W dealt Indies campaign The Japanese smashing into fication of American labor but they were not fiery speeches of pre1916 Mooney had been mellowed by years in prison His audiences were different perhaps a bit more accustomed to the ways of progressivism than those of Moo neys day He did not command the enthusiasm of the old days Billings meantime had decided to insist on the complete vindi cation of a pardon and won it from Governor Olson in January 1939 He was released from Fol som prison in October of that year when the governor commuted his sentence to time served with the comment I believe you have served a prison sentence for a crime you did not commit Mooneys wife Rena who took an active part in his fight for free dom was not present when he died They separated soon after Mooney was freed There had been differences between them for 15 years but the rift was not known publicly until Mooneys re lease Mooneys friends in the labor the American Federation of Labor the Congress of Industrial Organizations and the railway meet Friday to make funeral arrange allied defenses as I left Java aboard a warplane apparently were making every effort to speed up conquest of Dutch territory in order to concentrate their offen sive strength in the he allies can complete mobilization of their fighting power here These are the outstanding im pressions I carried from Java aft er weeks of reporting the dayby ejay advance of enemy forces down the Malaya peninsula and across the rich Dutch East Indies The American air force based at secret airdromes cleverly hidden in the Java mountains fought magnificently American pilots checked the Japanese in vasion for at least a week by battering attacks on the enemy at sea and on land But gradually the enemys nu merical superiority in fighter planes made itself felt It was understood that a number of United States planes were de stroyed on the ground late last week when they were sorely needed and that fighter plane re inforcements had not arrived as expected That was why it was necessary to remove some United States air planes from the area to avoid be ing picked off on the ground by the machine guns of enemy fighter planes Men on the air force did not hide their anger over conditions which made it necessary for them to leave when they were badly needed but even on the afternoon of onr departure the Japanese dropped calling cards bombs in the center of the field where a number of United States planes were momentarily expected to arrive Javas trouble was the same as Malayas There were numbers RAF flyers as well as American Dutch Plan MacArthur Stand in Hills By H J TICHELMAN BANDOENG Java Japanese captured Batavia capi tal of the Dutch East Indies Fri day and an outnumbered weary united nations army fell back into the hills of central Java for a MacArthur stand around this mountain stronghold Batavia abandoned by the Dutch after destruction of everything of use Jo the in vaders was he third allied and Singapore were the fall to the Japanese in less than three months of war in the far east Friday night after another day of steady enemy aerial attack Japanese soldiers had cut across middle Java from north to south occupied Jokjakarta and stood Mlbm sight of the Indian ocean The invasion armies ns a re sult of great superiority and mas tery of the air had thus over run western Javi cut off the eastern half of the island includ ing Soerabaja naval base and forced the defenders to make their stand in the rugged central region where volcanic peaks rise thousands of feet over the jungle Already the rumble of heavy artillery could be heard in the streets of Bandoeng and a major battle appeared to be developing to the north where the enemy previously had advanced to within perhaps 25 or 30 miles of this military headquarters and tem porary capital The Dutch face a struggle of utmost gravity but they have not given up and are fre quently striking back with tell ing effect believfng that they can hold out in he hills iiniil an allied counterdrive on other far eastern fronts can be started Powerful defenses guard the roads leading to Bandoeng Moun tain artillery has been in place for Defenders ALLIEffORCES LASHED BY JAP PLANE ATTACKS command had been removed o India from where the war might he prosecuted generally with greater effectiveness A r j c iimury nas Deen m place for A United States consul former1 weeks and lank barriers anliair ly nt Singapore was advising all Americans to leave at once Most of the press corps decided to leave for the south coast but some cor respondents including W H Mc Dougall of the United Press re mained in Java We made the trip from Ban doeng in an ancient protesting jalopy with a Javanese driver named George who seemed al ways to be lost in the pitchblack to an airfield just in darkness We got pilots in Java when T left but they had nothing to fly They had hammered the enemy relentlessly but they could not go on indef initely without reinforcements The cost of operating heavy bombers without adequate fighter protection had become obvious to anybody Even the antiaircraft protection in less effective than it had been in Ma not sufficient to pre vent the eventual loss of the big ships if they were left on the island I left Djokja in southwest Java on Sunday in my second re tirement before Japanese troops Guard left Singapore last month on a ship that was heavily bombed from the air as the Japanese closed in on that city t visited allied headquarters earlier but found that the high time to fling our bags aboard a departing heavy bomber The American pilots bewailed the con ditions that made it necessary for them to leave But as we waited at the field more bombers ar rived under orders to leave Java as soon as circumstances permit1 ted It was during the artcrnoon that Japanese bombers found our air drome and dropped bombs in the center of the runway Late in the evening the oppor tunity arrived to leave the sun scorched rectsand desert that served as a runway I talked lo two bomber pilots who had been through much of the aerial light ing in the East Indies They told how bombers were taken into the air from Java bases merely lo avoid destruc tion as Japanese warplanes ap proached Some of them flew around until they found a Japa nese ship or other target and bombed 11 One pilot told me that he bombed a Japanese armada that had so many transports it stretched to the horizon Upon arrival in Australia r craft guns md fortified points arc supplemented by barbed wire ob stacles and land mines in the path of the enemy This is the area where the Dutch hnd longplanned to make their lastditch stand if necessary if the test has come sooner than many are ready for the climactic battle Their biggest arsenals are hidden m the mountains near Bandoeng and their finest equipment has been withdrawn to these defense lines But admittedly the Japanese nave the great advantage of air control and the defense forces are weary after many hours of ruth less bombing attacks ltll IH I found airmen at desert posts who hadnt seen a cigaret for weeks Fortunately I had some to give them There is an atmosphere of war everywhere in Australia The peo ple acutely realize they lost many good fighting men in Malaya but recruiting is progressing rapidly and extensive defense measures are being taken Time after time people have asked me about the Malaya and Java campaigns in great detail VUV U LTVdll and wanted to know how long the Dutch could hold out in the Java only reply that the Dutch are confident of their abil ity to hold out but on the of Malaya I believe the lack of air support will be a terrible handi cap Buy your defense savings stamps from your Globe Gazette carrier boy or at the GG business office Allies Attack Japanese on Pegu Front MANDALAY Burma Uf British and allied troops attacked Japanese forces Friday on the Pegu front and were reported to have inflicted heavy casualties on the enemy t Reports from the front said that several fierce engagements were fought in which British in fantry forces were supported by armored cars British tanks have also been reported in action Skirmish lines thrown out in the Waw area northeast of Pegu were said to be barring Japanese from advancing on Pegu and the major battle for control of the northern approaches to Rangoon was expected in this area Fighting was reported by the British army to be of less inten sity than in past days and Ran goon itself was quiet with no Japanese air activity reported F R Is Silent on Eritrea Base Report WASHINGTON Roosevelt refused Friday to sup ply any further information about establishment of an American base m Eritrea Africa telling a press conference that lo do so would be an incitation to bomb it He was informed that Oliver Lyt tleton British minister ot state in the eastern Mediterranean area had spoken in London Friday of the establishment ot the Eritrean base and had said it is poing to be a whacker Wrecked Capital City of Java Is Abandoned to Invading Nipponese By ROGER D GREENE Associated Press War Editor Dutch headquarters acknowl edged Friday that allied troops had abandoned the wrecked capi tal city of Batavia and that the outnumbered united nations de fenders were being worn down by greatly superior Japanese in vasion forces amid violent battles flaming all over the island of Java Nevertheless Dutch troops in a terrific frontal assault were reported lo have driven the Jap anese from a section of the plains of Bandoeng headquar Icrs of ihe N E I command A Reuters dispatcli said the in vaders had retreated to the north while he mountains resounded with artillery fire Reuters also reported the Japa nese had been thrown back in some sectors of eastern Java where the enemy was driving toward the great Soerabaja naval base Imperial Tokio headquarters said Japanese troops completed occupation of Batavia in western Java at oclock Thursday night Virtually helpless under the lash of Japanese bombing ana machinegunning attacks he allies were reported falling back into the mountains chiefly around the military nerve cen ter at hey could fight to better advantage i j j But it was evident that the pic lure was growing darker by the hour with the defenders badly outnumbered As a result of the enemys great superiority and mastership ot the air the Dutch command said our troops are exposed con tinuously to such violent bom bardmentthat they have been unable to vest for many days and now are gradually becoming over tired Ancla the Dutch news agency said practically all of western Java had been overrun by the invaders and that Dutch Ameri can Australian and British troops had fallen back to new positions A bulletin from N E T head quarters admitted the capture ot Jogjakarta a city of 140000 population in a Japanese thrust knifing almost to the south coast of Java For all practical purposes the island thus was cut in two in the central section The Dutch communique de clared that the situation was seri ous but still not hopeless and said fierce battles were raging through out the islandwith the allies of fering desperate resistance Dutch troops were said to have recaptured one point The thunder of artillery fire was heard in Bandoeng itself as Japanese forces were reported less than 25 miles away Other Japanese columns were pressing a heavy onslaught toward the big Soerabaja naval base in eastern Java Under Dutch rule since 1619 wilh a peacetime population of 600000 Batavia had already been abandoned by the N E I colonial government Dispatches from Bandoeng in dicated that the outnumbered allies were slowly withdrawing to the volcanic castwest moun tain chain rising as high as 10 000 feet in the interior in the hope of duplicating Gen Doug las MacArthurs epic defense of Bataan peninsula in the Philip pines A Berlin radio broadcast quot ing the Domci Japanese news agency said that Japanese troops were storming at the gates ot Bandoeng the seat of government and that the invaders had ad vanced within 31 miles of Soer abaja The broadcast said Japanese parachute troops were playing a major role in the double assaults OUTNUMBERED DEFENDERS IN BURMA PUT UP FINE FIGHT In the battle of Burma British military quarters said the situation had changed little in the past three days and declared that both Ran goon the Burmese capital and fVgu key rail junction 40 miles   

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