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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: February 19, 1942 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - February 19, 1942, Mason City, Iowa                             OCPARTMENT OF KlSTDiy AVO ARCHIVES CE3 U NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME VOL XLVIII ASSOCIATED FIIESS AKO UNITED PRESS FUU IJSASED WIRES FIVE CENTS A COPY THE NEWSPAPtR THAT MAKIS ALL NORTH 10WANS NII6HIORS MASON CITY IOWA THURSDAY FEBRUARY 19 1942 THIS PAPEn CONSISTS OF TWO SECTIONS SECTION ONE NO 113 100 JAPANESE PLANES RAID DARWIN Burma Defenders Drive Japs IntaRiveyU Scroops Reach Java 1010 Yanks Thought Held by Japanese See paee 6 for list of 5 North lowans believed to he prisoners FIRE THROWERS ARE TAKEN BY BATAAN FORCES Jap Troop Movements Indicate Offensive Has Been Resumed WASHINGTON The war department reported Thursday the Japanese were increasing pressure on General Douglas MacArlhurs defense lines on the Bataan penin sula in the Philippines and troop movements indicated a resumption of the enemy offensive Several flame throwers a com munique said were captured along with three pieces of artillery in a relatively minor local action along with other Japanese equipment Meanwhile Japanese batteries on the south shore of Manila bay poured shells on the Corregidor string of fortifications without accomplishing a great amount of Fire was concentrated on outlying Fort Frank southernmost of the fortifications The communique No 114 based on reports received until a m eastern war time said 1 Philippine Theater The enemy is increasing his pressure on our lines in Bataan particularly on the right Ilsnk Heavy enemy artillery fire con tinues Japanesetroop movements behind the enemy lines indicate a regrouping of forces preliminary to a resumption of the offensive In a relatively minor local ac tion our troops captured three pieces of enemy artillery several llame throwers and a quantity of ordnance and signal supplies Enemy batteries on the Cavile shore continued to pound our har bor defenses without accomplish ing a great amount ot damage The lire on Fort Frank was particular ly heavy 2 There is nothing to report from other areas The captured flame throwers officials said were the first re ported on the Bataan fighting front Used effectively in the battle ot France the weapon is employed usually against pill boxes and other fixed fortifications difficult to put out of action byrifle fire 3 KILLED AS 2 TRAINS CRASH Rescue Crews Sent in Swamp Buggies to Site of Florida Accident WEST PALM BEACH Fla Wl trainmen were killed and at least five passengers were in jured Thursday in the wreck of two fast New YorkMiami Tourist trains seven miles south of West Palm Beach The New York office of the Seaboard Air Line railway said the engineers of both trains were killedinstantly At the scene an express mes senger identified as John Brown in of Plant City Fla was found dead in the wreckage Joseph Hill PostTimes report er said at least three coaches burst into flames after the trains collided on a curve about two miles from the Coastal highway Firemen from Delray and Boyn ton although handicappedby lack of proper facilitie apparently had the fires under control and trainmen said all passengers were rescued before the flames gained headway The spot at which the wreck was reported is largely inacces sible There the tracks travel in land toward the marshy reaches WASHINGTON navy department released Thursday a list of 1010 navy and marine corps officers and enlisted men presumed to have been taken prisoner by the Japanese on the islands of Wake and Guam and at Peiping Tientsin and Shanghai China Lieut Commander John T Tuthill Jr public relations offi cer of the third naval district also made public a roster of 1200 civilians who were employed in defense construction work on the two Pacific islands and who also are presumed to be prisoners of Among the navy officers serving at Guam when the island was captured by the Japanese on Dec 12 were the governor Capt George Johnson McMiltin of Youngstown Ohio Capt William Taylor Lineberry Coleratn N Car and Com mander Donald Theodore Giles Annapolis Md Heading the 11 officers and 63 men serving at Wake were Com mander Winfield Scott Cunning ham Long Beach Cal and Com mander Campbell Keene naval air station San Diego Cal Commander Leo Cromwell Thv son Washington D C was one of four officers and 11 men sta tioned at Peiping Lieut JG William Thomas Foley Flushing N Y and five enlisted men were serving at Tientsin and three ieutenants junior grade were ierving at Shanghai They were jcorge Theodore Ferguson Wau sau Wis Robert W McElrath Murray Ky and James Stephen ORourke Washington D C The marine garrison of 413 at Wake island was commanded by VTaj James Patrick S Dcvereux New York and included three majors in the marine corps avia ion branch George Hubbard Potter and Henry T Elrod of Honolulu and Paul Albert Put nam Coronado Cal Lieut Col William Kirk Mac Multy of San Francisco was ii command of the seven marine of ficers and 147 men serving at 3uam Maj Donald Spicer Coro nado Cal also was stationed at Guam Among the seven officers and extending eastward Okeechobee from Lake To reach the wreckage rescue crews were dispatched on swamp buggies amphibian tractors equipped to run on land or in shallow water Allies Claim 109 Japanese Ships Sunk Since Start of War BATAVIA have sunk or damaged a total ol 182 Japanese ships including known sunk up lo Netherlands Indies showed Thursday Feb 14 a summary Red Army Riflemen in Action J 111 innw USVOLUNTEER Fight 2 AIR ATTACKS Riflemen of the Russian army clad in white drop tn firingposition in an offensive somewhere on the RussoGerman front according to official Moscow sources This nic ture was sent by radio from Moscow to New York BREAK HINTED IN COLD WAVE Rising Temperatures Forecast Mason City Reports 16 Below tES MOINES brealc lowans have been looking for after three days of subzero tempera tures was hinted Thursday by the weatherman Rising temperatures Thursday afternoon and Thursday night1 read the state forecast while areas in the northern part ot the stiite were promised much warmer weather At midmorning the thermome ter read 8 above at DCS Moines after Mason City had recorded the low of 16 degrees below zero Thursday morning Burlington had of 13 the slate high Wednesday above Son of Engineer Is Killed in Attempt to Board Moving Train 132 mensemnTaTpVipTnTVere RVDENWOOD Wash Col William S Ashurst San Twelveyearold Billy Poindex Diego Cal and Mai Edwin P er wated along the railroad Diego Cal and Maj Edwin P McCaulley Ontario Cal At Tientsin the three officers and 53 men included Maj Luther A Brown Auburn Pa and Capt John A White Dayton Ohio The navy department state ment pointed out that because of the interruption of communi cations and the eliminating nf contact entirely when the vari ous outposts were overwhelmed the navy department cannot have absolute information of the exact status of all individuals who were serving in the armed forces and of civilians who were engaged on public works under takings However from information that had been available up to the time or near the time of the cap ture of some of the groups and from the rosters of personnel serving at the different places it is presumed that those not other wise accounted for are prisoners of the Japanese Thinks Son Not Held by Japs TK O R N T O N Paul James father ot Lloyd Ellis James said Thursday he did not believe his son is being held captive by the Japanese Lloyds name appeared on the list of those presumed by U S officials to be Japanese pris oners James said he received a letter Jan 26 which had been written by Lloyd on Johnston Island and mailed from there Jan 16 He had previously received a letter mailed about Christmas time from Pearl Harbor James said his son had started for Wake Island several months ago but his destination had been changed and he had been sent to another station Lloyd 24 enlisted in the marine corps two years ago at Des Moincs He is married and his wife is now teaching school at Lone Rock Lloyd is a radio operator in the marine corps tracks Wednesday night until a big freight lumbered by Suddenly he darted alongside an empty logging car and tried to board the moving train as hed seen brakemen nnd switchmen do so many times He fell under the wheels and was crushed to death Trainmen signalled the engi neer to stop He was J M Poin dcxtcr the boys father Buy savings stamps from your Globe Gazette carrier boy or at the GG business office Stimson Says U S Should Expect Attacks on Coasts Declares Counlry Must Not Be Pressured to Scatter Forces WASHINGTON oE War Stimson said Thursday thai the nation should expect at tacks all along our coasts and other places like the raids made by submarines on the Netherlands Caribbean islands ot Aruba The secretary urged at a press conference that the country be prepared also for pressure from thoughtlesspersons lo scat ter defensive forces to meet such attacks Yielding to that pressure would be the surest way 1 know of to lose tlie war Slimson said Victory will be won he de clared by massing our forces to carrythe war to the enemy He gave assurances that urgent prep arations were being made noiv for offense Noting criticism which he said had been voiced for failure of the united nations to seize the initi ative Stimson promised that we will seize every opportunity for counter attack and the offensive and every opportunity for sur prise Stimson announced that 90 441 volunteers joined the army in January more than doubling the record or any month before Pearl Harbor or in the first AVofld war This shows the men who are going to fight this war are not yielding to the defeatism or de spair we sometimes Hear of bac of the fighting fronts Stimson said He announced at the conference that three historic divisions had been ordered into active service and ihat living in a battalion of Filipinos the United States had been formed as a part the armys speedy expansion 1 To speed theexpansion ot land forces he said menwould be as signed tp the new divisions almbs immediately after their induction eliminating the 13 weeks of basic training normally undertaken ai replacementtraining centers The basic training will be provided in the divisions themselves The divisions ordered Inlo senice on March 25 are the 77th S2nd and SOlh infantry divisions of the organized re serves which since their demo bilization after thefirst World war have existed only in skele ton form The 77th made famous in 1918 by the episode ot the lost bat talion will be assembled and trained at Forl Jackson S Car with Major General Robert J Eichelberger commanding The S2nd division which in the World war included Sergean Alvin York will train at Camp Claiborne La Major Genera Omar N Bradley was assigned to command it The 90th division will train a Camp Barkeley Tex and be commanded by Major Genera Henry Terrell Jr It was known as the Alamo division in J917 18 because its members came from Texas and Oklahoma Stimson also announced tha the national guards 18 largi square divisions would be reor ganized into smaller streamlined triangular divisions to conform with other such units of th armed forces The three new reserve division ordered into service are the firs of 27 reserve divisions to b called out in expanding the arm this year to 3600000 men Survivors of Torpedoed Ship thf torpedoed Brazilian passengercargo steamer Virnia Suday In tllc filst axis hostilities against the South American republic since diplomatic relations were severed Jan 28 with GermainItaly STpn TI Prson is dead one of tlle 11 Passengers and 74 crew men aboard These survivors are neanng their rescue AIRMEN BATTLE JAPS IN BURMA Heavy Casualties on Both Sides Reported in Bilin River Fighting BULLETIN RANGOON Burma British troops drove Japanese forces trying to cross the Bilin into the river army head quarters reported Thursday in announcing that violent fighting with heavy casualties on both sides raged all along this front about 50 miles east of Ran goons railway link lo the Bur ma road RANGOON Burma imerican volunteer air group Dared into action on a wide lurma front Thursday blasting leavily at Japanese dive bombers perating in support of the lapi ese offensive toward the Burma upply route Action of the U S planes and British counterattacks were re lorted to be stemming Japanese rogress in the Bilin river area Both sides however re ported suffering heavy casualties It was the first time the American airmen have been re ported in action along the ac tual fighting front Previously they have engaged Japanese planes attempting ttfaUact the Rangoon area and have carried out raids on Japanese air bases There were indications thai the Japanese attack was reaching i critical stage The divebombing operations against which the U S planes were employed were said lo have been causing the British defenders of Burma great difficulties The Japanese crossed Hie north ern reaches of the Bilin river where they ran into a heavy Brit sh counterattack An effort to turn the British left flank failed Japanese forces near the mouth of the Bilin river were said to have been driven back British military sources esti mated the Japanese hase about two divisions possibly 30000 men presently engaged in the Burma offensive with another 30000 held in reserve Fighting continued furiously In the battle after 36 hours of ceaseless attack and counter attack It was reported with the Japanese attempting to mass large forces at bridgeheads they established by crossing the Bilin Enefny losses were reported vm usually high as ihc Japanese poured reinforcements into the front including troops moved northward from Malaya A Rangoon radio broadcast heard In Calcutta reported that British forces had been pushed back by Japanese crossing the Bilin river but had maintained our positions by counterattack ing according to Thursdays com munique British bombers heavily at tacked the Japanese along the river The fighting continued without a pause throughout the night and Thursday morning after Japanese spearheads had thrust across Ihe Bilin river within less than SO miles of the Burma road supply line to China The main enemy attack was directed loward Kyaiklo 23 air miles from the RansoonMan dalaj railroad at Pegu but a second big batlle was in prog ress about 175 miles to the north in central Burma where Chi nese forces had been stationed The Japanese driving toward Rangoon which has been parllj evacuated apparently had been forced out into the open paddy lands of the Bilin front after long period of attack by infilter mg through the jungle Report Reds Squirt Water Form Ice on German Foes LONDON London said Thursday that the Russian are using a new secret weapon I is a pump driven by an clcctri motor which squirts cold wale upon the Germans who arc quickl covered with ice in the below zero weather BATAVIA N E I peditionary forces of the united nations including a relatively mall number of xith ground Iroops and bomber and fighter pilots from the United arrived in Java in hep defend this island stronghold against the inevitable Japanese as sault it was announced Thursday The combined expeditionary forces known previously also to include Australians it was said authoritatively are by no means large enough yet hut arrival serves as an in dication tiiat the Netherlands Indies do not fight alone While Dutch forces fought stub born delaying actions in southern Sumatra southern Borneo nnd southern stepping stories to the Java citadel of the united official Dutch news agency was permitted to disclose the arrival of the united nations forces The battles on the approaches to Java are helping the united na tions to mass all possible strength to meet the expected invasion nf Javn Coinciding with the announce ments of reinforcements Balavia had two air raid alarms Thursday but there was no attack Some ob servers said that the enemy plane merely flew over the city There were wide expressions of confidence that the United States and Australia would sup ply additional troops as quickly as possible Aneta added that American ground troops as well as bomber and fighter pilots which already rave aided in the defense of the ndies now are seen frequently n the island heart of the Dutch vast Indies and headquarters of he united nations supreme com nand in the southwest Pacific The agency quoted authoritative ources as declaring that the for eign troops have received a hearly velcome but that their numbers ire by no means large enough et The agency said Americans arc ften seen in telephone exchange iffices wailing to place calls to heir home towns and that in the past six or seven weeks the ex hange of one cast Java town has been handling an unprecedented lumber of transPacific telephone alls The battle on Ihe Sumatra approach is delaying and cutting down the power of the inevit able Japanese assault on central island of Java Dutch land forces having abandoned PalembanR in south ern Sumatra about 270 miles from Balavia itself are continu ing stubborn fighting against the if Thus the weekend destruction of 5500000000 worth of oil gasn line refining and transport fa cilities and other property in the Palembang arci when Japanese parachutists assaulted it last Sat urday was not the signal for aban donment of southern Sumatra but rather a prelude to redrawing the battle line for the southern ON AUSTRALIAN PORTREPORTED Extent of Damage to Potentially Vital Base Is Not Known SYDNEY Australia linn 100 Japanese bombers and escorting fighter planes attacked he north coast city and port of Darwin potentially a vital united nations naval and supply base in two raids Thursday in the first direct assaults on the Australian mainland Prime minister John Curtin from his hospital sickbed an nounced thai bombers with protective fighter formations participated in the first raid Thursday morning and thai an other wave of 21 bombers re turned lo the allack In the aft ernoon Four of the second group were said to have been shot down Curtin who announced the raid in Australias thinly settled re mote north full state ment as soon as details become known A communique issued subse quently said the first raid lasted about one hour and was directed both against the town itself and against shipping in ne harbor Some casualties were inflicled and there was some damage to service installations lails are not yet known it said DanvitTs importance to the united nations has grown is Japans lide of conquest has roltci sniilhiiard in the Pacific toward this island continent Us location on Australias north ernmost rim gives it a strategic geographic position not only as a leet bie but also ns n gateway for supplies for the defense of the ommonweulth Air raid alarms iatl sounded I here several times early in the war its Ian only aerial scouts iiad approached nnd there had been no bombing before At the start ot the war in the Pacific Darwin was essentially a reserve bnsc for the united nations 1000mio separated Ion only rnost tip of the island which ii um by Sunda strait from Java itself Thursdays communique of the Netherlands Indies armed forces said concisely of the Sumatra fighting The action against the enemy which landed at Palembang con tinue The Japanese meanwhile con tinued their aerial harassment and reconnaissance of Javn and olhcr part of the A E 1 a heavy cost but at and the Buy your defense savings stamps from your Globe Gazette carrier boy or at the GG business office Weather Report FORECAST IOWA Rising temperatures Thursday afternoon and Thurs day nigh I MINNESOTA Considcrably warmer Thursday afternoon and Thursday night occasional light snow Thursday night and west portion Thursday afternoon IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics Maximum Wednesday 3 above Minimum Wednesday night IK below At 8 a m Thursday 15 below YEAR AGO Maximum n Minimum 15 behind Manila Singapore Soerabiji and Ambdina in Netherlands East Indies Now Japans hordes are poised for an invasion attempt against Java the site of Soerafaaja and all the others already are in enemy hands Soerabaja is less than four hours flying time from Darwin and Am boina is only 675 miles lo tho north The loss or incapaciUtion of Uarivin iniglif therefore banish the United nations fleets from that area nf the Pacific Rear Admiral P E McNeil enirineer inK chief of the Australian navy left for the west coast port of Perth on tlic Inriitn ocean this mouth to direct worh which had taken he prime minister himself there W Darwin actually is little more than an outpost 3000 miles from southern Australia and without direct rail connection with the in dustrial southland The railroad from Darwin ends at Birdum 100 miles to the south and is linked with another connecting with the main federal railroads by a new G00milcong highway built in 93 days during 1340 This was the result of swift ex pansion follovmg the outbreak C war in 1930 which converted Dar win from n frontier town of cattle raisers and pear fishers to an im portant military establishment and a port ol modern military design Infantry forces stationed at Dar win are charged with guarding thp port against surprise attack by land a threat because the coast is uninhabited for long distances to the east and west Although there never was a large Japanese population in the whole vast northern territory most were in or near Darwin and many supposed Japanese pearl fishermen in recent years were suspected of taking soundings to supply Japan with important navi gation data concerning Australias north const MAKE SLIGHT1 ERROR ABIIENE Kan Wi When a member of she police force Tre Huston got married his fellow officers They lied the tin cans on thg chiefs car   

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