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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - February 13, 1942, Mason City, Iowa                             u trsr DEPART VENT OF H I T C V M A i C i 3 3 i N E A NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME VOL XLVIII WED PRESS AND UNITED FBESSFUL1 LEASED WIRES THE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS MASON CITY IOWA FRIDAY FEBRUARY 13 1942 THIS PAPEIl CONSISTS OF TWO SECTIONS SECTJON ONE NO 108 NAZI FLEET ESCAPE STIRS BRITISH Singapore Grimly Holds Line in Lost Battle JAPS HAVE TO GronnVoodPointing One of Lost Pictures White Russia If Nipponese Admit Force Is Still 2 Miles From Downtown Singapore By ROGER D GREENE Associated Press War Editor British imperial defenders fight ing the lost battle of Singapore were reported holding grimly on a line within two miles of the citys heart Friday and a broad cast at 10 p m Singapore time 10 a m declared with a touch of proud defiance There is ample evidence that the Japanese forces are not hav ing everything their own way The broadcast said there had been no great change in the general line The Tokio radio as serted that Japanese thanks had battered their way into British camps along the Singapore race i track just outside the city A terse dramatic message from A E Percival dis s losed that British defenders of Vngapore still were putting up tout resistance against great jJds Army Minister Francis Forde of ustralia said he received the r message from General Percival at p m Singapore time a m j Even the TokibJradio spoke of lesistanceuatSingapore Domei off icial Japanese news agency conceded that the in i vaders were still two miles from downtown Singapore but while iheTBritish fought a delaying ac tion it was apparent that the net was steadily drawing tighter In Australia Prime minister John Curtin summoned parliament to meet a week from Friday be cause of the continued deteriora tion of the situation in the Pa cific JAP DIUVE AOIED i AT JAVA SLACKENS In the Dutch Indies the N E I command reported a temporally slackening of the manypronged Japanese drive aimed at Java amid ominous hints that the united nations high command might be preparing to fall back to Austra lia Dispatches from Batavia said the Dutch fully aware that the ot Singapore would open the floodgates for allout Japanese as sault upon Java and Dutch Suma tra were determined to resist against any odds We will go on fighting and damn the consequences a semi official spokesman declared The spokesman said the Dutch would never abandon their rich tropic islands without a fight evcnif Gen Sir Archibald P Wa vells supreme allied command decided the best strategy would be to surrender Java and Su matra bases and withdraw to Australia The Dutch command said scorchedearth destruction of the harbor works at Japaneseoc cupied Macassar chief port on Celebes Island north ot Java had been so effective that the enemy will not find anything of use to him The Macassar harbor area was reported still in Jlames In the battle of Burma British headquarters reported that heavy new fighting had broken out in the Paan sector 30 miles from the mouth of the Salween river with the Japanese attempting to force another crossing in their drive toward Rangoon VIOLENT ATTACKS ARE PUSHED AGAINST SINGAPORE In the siege of Singapore lat est official dispatches said Japans invasion hordes were pressing violent air and artillery attacks on the last toehold of British de fense with heavy fightint raging about the MacRithie reservoir in the center of the island Shelling has been frequent on forward areas and on Singapore town a British communique said belying a hnme radio broad cast Thursday which asserted that downtown Singapore Japanese propagandists had lo back ivaler on cxfravasant claims that all fortifications of he island had been captured By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Russias t r i u m ph ant armies reached while Russia Friday strik ing into the Germanheld repub lic bordering old Poland Soviet frontline dispatches said that Russian ski troops dashing across heavy snow had penetrated German lines into white Russia The locale of the penetration was not given but Russian forces sweeping down from the Valdai hills northwest ot Moscow were known to have readied Toropets about C5 miles from the white Rus sian border more than two weeks ago White Russia lies west of Smo lensk key German base on the Dnieper river 230 miles west of Moscow The great soviet breakthrough might easily jeopardize the whole German north flank around Len ingrad Wa Thursday night at an Iowa City hospital fePast above at workda r of two companion pictures he did while at the North Iowa resort I a t i i wn MJ lie inn wniie ac tne it lamihav witty Iowa scenes was oneof his characteristic remarks am most and that the city itself was in he hands of the invaders of moment in the lost in the fact that statements of the Japanese had misled even the leader of their German allies Adolf Hitler A Berlin broadcast Thursday night said the fuehrer wired the Japanese emperor his heartiest congratulations on the occasiion of the capture if Singapore Yet Australian British ami Indian soldiers begrimed and bleeding from five days and nights of heavy fighting against lomj odds still carried on striking in defense or attack with a spirit Emperor Hirohitos soldiers evident ly found perplexing Domei said Japanese military observers were flabbergasted at the inhuman sense of duty of British leaders which prevented surrender to spare troops and civilians further punishment The British radio said the de fenders had inflicted terrible losses on Japanese reinforce ments moving by daylight from the Malayan mainland sinking halt their boats in the milewide Jo horc strait DEFENDERS MARK TJP GAINS AT SALWEEN RIVER British Burmese and Chinese defenders of in force by American and British air in two vic tories in the Salween river area over Japanese striking from Thai land toward Rangoon These were in the Paan and Martaban sectors roughly 80 miles by air from Rangoon capita of Burma and sea gate to the road to Mandaiay the Chinese war sup ply route Defeated Japanese in the Paan area have temporarily abandoned operations a communique said at Martaban the invaders were re ported to have scrambled away hastily under attack throwing down their arms In the equatorial Pacific young civilian flyers of the Netherlands East Indies were mobilized to augment the reg ular air force which is hammer mR al Japanese spearheads over a 3000 mile front Japans early victories were de scribed by the Moscow newspaper organ as temporary successes Fravda declared Japanese dif ficulties would increase through lengthening of communication lines and growing allied resist ance in Front of Shop successful auto displays this n in front of his shop Experienced tires Well Known Artist Dies in Iowa City After Long Illness Painter Succumbs Just One Day Before His 50th Birthday IOWA CITY in the heart ot the farm belt where he found subjects for many of his best known paintings Artist Grant Wood died Thursday night after a long illness He entered the hospital Nov 24 snd underwent an operation Dec 19 If he had lived until Friday he would have been 50 years old Woods most widely known works included A m e r i c a n Gothic depicting an austere farm couple from his native midwest Daughters of Revo lution which drew harsh criticism from D A K mem bers and Parson Wecms Fable in which he paid his re spects to the story of Gcorjre Washington and the cherry tree f One of his earliest paintings was the Woman With Plants a portrait of his mother Others were the Dinner For Thresh ers Young Corn Arbor Day Stone City and Fall Plow ing His most recent works were Spring in Town and Spring in the Country completed last sum mer in a studio which he set up in an abandoned railway station at Clear Lake Wood joined the staff of the School ot Fine Arts at the State University of Iowa in 1034 and he held a pofessorship from June 15141 He was elected to the National Academy in 1935 and held honorary degrees from the University of Wisconsin Wesley an university Lawrence college and Northwestern univcrsily He was born of Quaker par entage on a farm near Ana mosa and when his father tiicti he began al he age if 10 to share the responsibilities of supporting the family The family moved lo Cedar Rapids where Wood returned later after army service in the first World war to teach art for seven years in the public schools Formal training for his art ca reer had included study at the Minneapolis Handcraft Guild in 1920 and at the Chicago Art In stitute and the Stat University of Iowa There were several trips abroad in the postwar years As sponsor of on art colony at Stone City near his birthplace he was credited widely with region alizing art The hope of a native Ameri can art lies in the development of regional ait ccnlevs and competi tion among them he said once Explaining his choice of Iowa for the background of his prin dpal paintings he declared t i had to go to France to appreciate Iowa I Some lowans called the American Gothic a libel on the state but Woods reply was that his sister Nan had mod eled for the woman and a Ce dar Kapids friend later identi fied himself as the man w In response to criticism of the Daughters of Revolution Wood admitted he had painted the three dour tightlipped women in a humorous light but added I dont like toryism I dont like to have anyone try to set up an aristocracy of birth in a re public With the artist at his death were a sister Mrs E K Graham of Los Angeles and a brother Frank of Waterloo Funeral services for Die famed j I lowan will be held at the Tur ners mortuary in Cedar Rapids Iowa Saturday afternoon al i oclock Dr M W Lampc head oi thc University of Iowa school of religion will be in charge of the services He will be buried beside his mother in the cemetery at Ana niosa scene of his boyhood days BILLYHUGHES BUS DESTROYED The big bus in uh i c h Billv Hughes of Mason City and his dance orchestra travel was de stroyed in a fire lite Thursday night Kcrmit Bierkamp manager of the band was informed Friday The bus caught fire while it was standing near a dance hall in Worthington Dubuque county No one was in the bus at the time but the street clothing the 10 band members had left in the bus was lost Hughes is the son of Mr and Mrs W J Hughes 1516 Delaware avenue southeast He was grad uated from St Josephs high school in 1940 and attended Ma son City junior college the fol lowing year He organized his uana while in junior college Twin Sons Celebrate 13th Birthday on 13th PRINCETON Ind and Harry Glen twin sons of Gib son County Surveyor Harry C Morrison celebrated their thir teenth birthday on Friday the thirteenth WARD PAYS IN TAX Use Levy Collection Is Accumulation in State Since 1938 DES MOINES Iowa lax commission Friday reported receipt of a check for 5307781 from Montgomery Ward and company in payment of 2 per cent usetaxes accumulated on the companys mail order business in this state since 1938 The payment reflects 515389 050 mail order purchases made by lowans Town law places liability fox collection oi the tax on the mer chant even though the levy was not collected from the customer at the time a purchase is made Commission officials said the payment covered taxes only and does not include penalties which have not yet been computed Although there arc no official estimates available it has been reported that the total principal and penalty payments of Mont gomery Ward and Sears Roebuck and company may reach The two companies fully fought assessment of the 2 per cent use interstate mail order business in four years of litigation and negotiation includ ing one trip to the United States supreme court Sears has not yet paid the ac cumulated taxes but is negotiat ing the problem of the amount with the commission Much Censure Falls on RAF Ask Agencies Free Men for War Work W A SHIN CIO N a means of further converting the government Itself to a wartime basis President Roosevelt dis closed Friday he had told heads of all federal agencies that it was imperative that man power released by increasing the work week be effectively channeled into defense work He transmitted to the depart REPORT RAISES JAP LOSSES IN JAN 31 RAID 5 Nipponese Warships and 11 Auxiliary Vessels Destroyed Detailed report of attack on page 2 WASHINGTON navys surprise raids on Japanese bases in the Marshall and Gilbert is lands proved Friday to have in flicted even heavier punishment on the enemy than first reports hinted The batteries and bombers of Pacific fleet units got these re sults Jan 31 in a lightning of fensive sweep They sank five Japanese a 17000 ton con verted aircraft carrier They sent eleven Japanese auxiliary vessels to the bottom They destroyed at least 41 en emy warplanes either in aerial dogfights or on the ground And they plastered destruc tion all over the important naval and air bases which the Jap anese had prepared to threaten the flank of the V S supply route to Australia and the south west Pacific x The news that five warships had been bagged was a gratifying surprise to the capitol for the in itial reports the day after the raid indicated that the only victims of the U S fleet task force had been Japanese auxiliary vessels Besides the 17000 ton con verted carrier the Japanese lost a light cruiser 1 destroyerand two submarines The carrier was believed to have acapacity of 25 or more warplancs and it ap peared probably that some of these were lost when the ship was des troyed although the navy made no specific claims iti that regard Another gratifying disclosure about the vigorous raid was that a flying admiral directed the opera tion ViceAdmiral William F Halsey Jr commander of car rier division one in the aircraft battle force commanded the well balanced force of aircraft car riers cruisers and destroyers which carried out the attack To the capital this was an indication that officers of the air arm were being entrusted with responsibility in important missions requiring synchronized air and surface operations The navy department issued a lengthy communique on the re suits of the raids which hit Jap anese strongholds on Roi Kwaja lein Wotje Taroa and Jaluit lands in the Marshall group and Makin in the Gilberts The report listed American losses as five planes for tin entire operation and one cruise damaged by a small The original report placed the plane losses at 11 but the navy said this apparent discrepancy would be cleared up later Although the additional sue cess of the raiding sweep welcome it Could not alter the grim feeling which weeks of al most uninterrupted reverses created in a capitol already braced for further setbacks Probe Collapse of 1IH k Where 2 LONDON au dacity in parading three of her most valuable ships of war past Britains tightly guarded front door shocked these islands Friday There was instant clamor to know how a second rate navy could do that Against his majes tys sea guardians and the press began shouting for scalps By now the 2liOOU ton German battleships Scharnhorst and Gnei senau and the 10000 ton Prinz Eu gen probably have reached the haven of German waters in the Helgoland Bight after running the length ot the English channel with an escort which slipped past the narrow corridors defenders and knocked 42 British planes out of the sky Thursday Not only the bloiv to Britains air and naval prestige in which the empires pride is highest but also its consequences disturbed tlic British With the British fleet Involved in the Mediterranean and far Pa cific the Germans now have earned an opportunity to join those powerful ships to their other battle forces and possibly heavily weight the scales of naval power in the Atlantic Much censure fall on the air EAF and the fleet air it was a virtual umbrella of air protection stem ming out in relays from German bases ou the French coast which saw the flotilla safely through the channel a centuries old sj m bol of the British isles invul nerability British sea power lias received the most insolent challenge made against it for years declared the Evening Standard No German fleet ever sailed through the straits of the channel In the lost war Indeed no enemy fleet has dared to do it for more than a century The sea was ours It hurled a fistful of why at the RAF and the navy asking whether the airforce had wasted its money on huge bombers instead of buying torpedo planes IIH whether airpower wis effectively coordinated with the other ser vices as it has shown to be in Japan and Germany The urgent need is tor reform at the top said the Evening News lumping the battle of the channel with the bad news from the Orient and Libya for the formation of n new and smaller war cabinet and more determined grapple with our tremendous problems No doubt we shall be given the usual soothing explanations but the miscalculations have piled up too ominously to be dismissed with a flourish of words a grand inquest by the prime min ister into the whole matter of framing and control of our war strategy is vital to us Ts Died government departments and ser vice had lengthened the work week voluntarily to 44 hours In most instances it had been 39 hours H is nccessarv the president said to capitalize on this increase since it would release experienced employes for war work and would help relieve the shortage in ing for individuals and govern ment officers and help keep people from crowding into the national capital Mr Roosevelt also has instructed the budget director to cooperate with the various federal agencies in reviewing immediately appro priations for governmental ac tivities so as to establish admin istration reserves for the remain der of the current fiscal year proportionate to the approximate increase in manhours accruing in the various agencies j ROCK ISLAND III I thoritics Friday were investigating the collapse of the building hous ing the Schlegcl Drug store which Thursday crushed two women to death and injured H other per sons The four story building the roof ot which had been removed was being converted into a one story structure CONDEMNS TOLL TAXES WASHINGTON Roosevelt Friday condemned the levying of poll taxes as a practice that has prevented many poor people in the south from voting and said he has opposed such levies all his life Weather Report FORECAST IOWA Little change in temper atures Friday afternoon and Friday night Occasional snow in the northeast portion Fri day night MASON CITY Not much change in temperature Friday after noon occasional light snow Friday night MINNESOTA Occasional light snow Friday night and in north and west portions Friday afternoon little change in tem perature IN MASON1 CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics Maximum Thursday 2 Minimum Thursday night 13 At 8 a m Friday n YEAR AGO Maximum Minimum Precipitation 32 race Will Get State Windshield Stamps for Autos in 1943 place of 1943 Iowa automobile license plates5 of Public treasurers deputies and license clerks who were called to Des Moines to confer on the problem Hopes for regular license plates in 1343 were abandoned some time ago because the state could not obtain steel Originally it was suggested a small metal strip could be pro vided lor attachment to the 1912 plate but James Allen state motor vehicle registration chief said this plan was dropped because the strip would not have an iden tifying serial number Fischer said no decision had been reached on a design for the new windshield stomp but it probably would be in the shape of an outline of Iowa Only one stamp would be issued for each car and automobiles also would be required to carry their IfH2 license plates HEAVY ATTACK FAILS TO HALT NAZI WARSHIPS Criticism of Churchill Cabinet Is Touched Off by Surprise Dash LONDON OIRI British pilots officially reported Friday that three or four torpedoes struck home against the German battle fleet that escaped homeward through the Dover strait and that a big explosion was seen around one of the 2GQDDton enemy battle ships Scharnliorst and Gneisenau An authoritative source admit ted Friday afternoon that prob ably all three German warships have arrived safely at their desti nation butreported thai the speed of the nazi naval squadron was cut from 28 oi30 knots to IS or 20 knots presumably by damage inflicted in the Britisii attack No British surface ships were lost in the encounter the source said He reported the final British attack was an air bombardment shortly before dark Thursday night Dover coast residents had believed that a night bombing at tack had been carried out British aircraft and warships still searched the North sea for crippled enemy vessels but naval sources acknowledged that the creator part of the squadron must have reached the safely of Emtlcn on the Ger man coast or a Helgoland bay port The successful dash of the strong enemy warship force from Brest through the Dover strait de spite a fivehour British air and sea attack touched off a blast of criticism of the cabinet of Prime Minister Winston Churchill and raised the threat that powerful German sinface raiders might soon be turned loose again to strike at allied shipping The surprise dash for safely largely was successful and may be of tremendous importance in the struggle for sea power in both the Atlantic and the Pacific but Britisii pilots expressed confidence they had struck damaging blows The pilots of one of the squad rons escorting our torpedo bomb ers reported seeing what appeared to be torpedoes striking one of the battleships following an ex plosion around the ship the air ministry announced The coastal command Bean fort squadrons claimed three tor pedo hits The statement did not specify what ships the Bexuforts hit but it did tell of direct hits with 250 pound bombs on a 500 ton enemy ship which broke In two and sank and on a smaller ship which was left aflame The German 10000 ton cruiser Prinz Eugcn and other strong air and sea escort forces protected the enemy battleships during their dash through the channel at a time when poor visibility inter fered seriously with the Brit ish ahacK Naval experts feared the Ger man fleet led by he Scharnhorst and Gnciscnau and Prinz Euficn and including destroyers torpedo boa Is and mine sweepers might already have reached the safety of Helgoland on the German north coast in the 14 hours of darkness after Britisii warships and planes lost sight of them at dark Thurs day Naval quarters admitted shortly before noon 6 a m CWT that the greater part of the German fleet at least prob ably had reached the safety of Kmdcn just on the other side of the Dutch frontier or a port on Helgoland bay It was disclosed only Friday that as a screen to divert and confuse British air and naval forces a fleet of German bombing planes had made the heaviest day light attack in many months otx the Britisii cast coast Thursday is the German warships were ap proaching the Dover strait When last sighted at dark Thursday the German ships had scattered under the British at tack but they were nearing Hel goland even then it was admitted with probably not more than 150 miles to go Now the sole hope ot catching them lay in the possibility that some had been so badly damaged by the ferocious and costly at tack of British planes warships and coastal guns that their speed had been materially reduced The Britisii attacked with ev erything they had including Can adian air force planes which flew into the deadliest area ot the battle Rut the communique of the admiralty and air ministry claimed only probable and pos sible hits by Bun fire torpedoes and aerial hombs and hc British   

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