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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: February 9, 1942 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - February 9, 1942, Mason City, Iowa                             NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME COMP DEPARTMENT OP HISTORY AND ARCHIVCG MOINES IA VOL XLVIII ASSOCIATED PRESS AND UNITED PRESS KUJU LKASEO WIRES FIVE CENTS A COPY THE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKErAU NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS MASON CITY IOWA MONDAY FEBRUARTjliir PAPKB CDNSgW SECTIONS JAPS LAND ON SINGAPORE I NO 104 BATAVIARAIDED FOR FIRST TIME BY JAP PLANES Machine Gunning of 2 Reported by Dutch News Agency BATAVIA N E I nese planes made their first raid of the Pacific war on Batavia capital of the Netherlands East Indies Monday in an intensifying to be a prelude to an attempt at invasion ot Java center of the united nations resisance to the Japanese in the southwest Pacific The raid carried out by six to eiffht Japanese fighters directed mainly at Kemajoran and Tijililifan airdromes near Batavia Aneta news agency said The attacks were limited lo machinegunning and no bombs were dropped Streets in the capital and its suburbs were also strafed Some damage was done to could always blame their tardiness army planes at Kemajoran and on tne storm two passenger planes were dam Motorists who took their cars aged A special communfque said drove through the darkness with nivi Murve itrniA tnL i two civilians w ere seriously wounded and nine slightly hurt At least one and possibly two of the raiders were shot down Japanese efforts to attack the harbor were turned back by heavy antiaircraft fire Enemy activity also was re ported over other parts of Java Sumatra and Borneo The NEI high command said Japanese patrols were pushing i south from the charred oil port of Balikpapan on the east Bor neo coast apparently planning to reach Bandjermassin im portant trade center on the south shore of Borneo facing Java The port was said to be a prime Japanese objective as the men ot Nippon attempted to force an arc around the vital citadel of Java in preparation fovinvasion Palembang oil center in south cast Sumatra was bombed again but the communique said there were no allied losses At least and probably three enemy planes were shot down over the great naval base of Soerabaja Saturday The attack on Batavia began during lunch time after two days of Japanese reconnaissance flights and a long series of alarms during previous days The allclear sounded a n hour and a half later J P Bouwer Aneta staff cor respondent said he saw two col umns of black smoke in the sky near the center of the city The great calmness prevail ing everywhere was remark able he said and to a large extent it was undoubtedly due to the fact that the raid had been expected for so long that when it finally came it caused almost a feeling of relief Antiaircraft batteries went into actiion immediately after Japanese planes were sighted and later Dutch fighters took to the air and engaged the attackers in dogfights Aneta said 51 persons were re ported killed anc1 54 injured in Sundays raid on Soerabaja chief naval hase of the Indies The largest number of casualties oc curred when a direct hit was scored on a streetcar under which a large number of natives had taken shelter The raid was directed mainly against the dockyards but reports said the damage was negligible PRIESTDlET AT DOUGHERTY Services Wednesday for Father Collins Victim of Illness Rev J J Collins 73 priest at St Patricks Catholic church here for the past 14 years died Sunday morning following a lingering illness services will be held at 10 oclock Wednesday morning at St Patrick s church Burial will be made m Mount Olivet cemetery at Washington D C Father Collins was born at Abbey Fealc Hill Ireland on Aug wa ffird Cant Find on Account Farmer Milks Cows and Does Chores at About Same Sun Time By GEORGE S MILLS DES MOINES Iowa early bird had a terrible time got up an hour later than usual by the clock and he couldnt find Ihe worm for the snow anyway Daylight savings time known as war time now came into the lives of 2533000 lowans amid whirling flakes Monday Clocks er night thereby advancing uie darkness an hour in the morn ing and advancing a corresponding amount to the daylight at the other end of the day The sun rose at p m war time and wont go down until p m here Many an officebound worker suppressed a yawn Monday morn ing because he went to bed by the old time and got up by the new Those who forgot to change their clocks and were late as a result headlights on In some communi ties teachers promised to be leni ent to children who didnt appear until after the final bell At the same time the teachers warned that the same excuse wontwork Tuesday The Iowa farmer milked his cows and did his chores at about the same sun time as usual But he had to remember that the stores where he trades in town are open ing and closing on war time The change offered a ready made alibi for lowans to miss such pleasant dates as trips to the dentist On the other hand there have been no reports of persons missing their noon lunch because of the time switch 6 Inches of Snow Falls in Western Iowa DES MOINES snow blanket running up to six inches in depth covered Iowa Monday and banished ideas of spring from the minds of lowans who were getting all ready mentally to begin spading the garden The Iowa highway commission reported the snow measured six inches in the west part of the state and tapered down to two inches in eastern Iowa Highways are somewhat slip uiMy due to snow packing on pavements the commission said The weather bureau said the moisture content of the snow measured 45 inch at Fort Dodge Other melted snow measurements Omaha 30 Des Moines 23 Sioux City 25 Charles City 23 Mason City 13 and Iowa City 10 The Union bus depot here re ported no drifting and all buses on time Weather Report FORECAST MINNESOTA temperature Monday aftcrnon and Monday night with occa sional light snow IN MASON CITY GlobeGazetle weather statistics Maximum Sunday 27 Minimum Sunday night 20 At 8 a m Monday 20 Snow 2i inches Precip 13 inches YEAR AGO Maximum 26 Minimum g The figures for Sunday Maximum Saturday 32 Minimum Saturday ID At 8 a m Sunday 20 YEAR AGO Maximum 14 Minimum 4 PrcciDilaticn trace I Lost an Hours Sleep Last Night OF TANGIER RIOTS London Sees Propaganda as Effort to Embitter Relations With Spain By TOE ASSOCIATED PRESS The battle of diplomacy and propaganda for strategic position in the Mediterranean basin over shadowed actual war there Mon day with the British charging the axis with sponsoring native out breaks against them in Spanish Morocco London disclosed that a strong protest had been lodged with the commander of the Spanish military forces at Tangier over axisinspired viols among the Moslem natives following the ex plosion of a time bomb for which axis propagandists with remark able promptness blamed the Brit ish An authoritative London source said the attention ot the Spanish government probably be directed to axis at tempts lo embitter British Spanish relations Spain con ceivably could be forced into war by Germany and Italy old time benefactors of the present nationalist government of Gcn eralissima Franco The inflammatory trend of axis propaganda over the Tangier in cident suggested that this was Adolf Hitlers objective Actual warfare in the Mediter ranean region was marked by axis reports of a raid on the British naval base at Alexandria Egypt new air attacks on Malta and claims that axis airmen had scat tered British imperial columns in eastern Libya The axis admitted a new RAF attack on Tripoli BRITISH APEAK TO HAVE CHECKED AXIS IN LIBYA By and large the British ap peared to have checked the Ger manItalian counteroffensive in Libya about 40 miles west of To bruk The axis offered no new claims of ground gained Spanish Morocco authorities quieted riotous factions in Tan gier by martial law after an out burst which was touched off by the explosion Friday of a time bomb in a taxi loaded with British diplomatic baggage on a Tangier pier Fourteen persons on the crowded dock were killed and 30 were wounded The British and the Germans accused each other of inciting the Arabs to xiolencc It was noteworthy that Ger many if the Spanish would allow it could use Spanish soil as a springboard for a direct assault on Gibraltar and across the Gibral tar Strait intoy northwest Africa threatening South America and the South Atlantic NEW OFFENSIVE IS LAUNCHED BY RUSSIA The Russians meanwhile were reported launching a new offen srSIS MASON day afternoon ending Monday a year round basis to suprSant reidv h rf the a1 szwra Yawninjr was permitted Mon day in the best of circles after everybody lost an hours sleep as the clocks were moved ahead to war time The hew time went Into effect officially at 2 a m Monday but most people put their clocks ahead an hour to the new daylight savings time upon retiring Sunday night Konnie Smith 16 months old son of Mr and Mrs Russell M Smith Jefferson visiting friends in Mason City is showing the effects of insufficient sleep Mason City school children had to get up before daylight in order to get to their classes on time Lock photo WILL CONTINUE FOR DURATION Change Comparable lo That of Other Warring Nations to Save Power WASHINGTON The na tion went on war time Monday with all official clocks moved ahead one hour for the duration The changeover was somewhat comparable to the action taken by other belligerent nations when the war began more than two years ago and goes a step farthcrthan daylight saving time eslab lishcd in the last war In that con flict this nation moved its clocks up only from March to October War time President Roose velt so named it became effec tive by law at 2 a m standard time in each of the four time zones which divide the country Proponents of the measure in Krasnograd is an important city jwa equal to about 1000000 There will be no dio schedules as a result new time standards The only real change occasioned by faster time will be the rela tion between clocks and sun I0 which will rise and set an hour asked later as far as Ihe United Stales is concerned The law provides for a return lo the old standards in Planes made in the United was that States were reported performing or power capa satisfactorily on the Russian front in the extreme cold which has 111 uje fMicme cold wnicn has horsepower for industry would be jammed a large part of the Gcr savcd The federal power commis man war machine sion plans to make a detailed study in an effort to measure ac curately the effect daylight saving time icreams of Woman Frighten Bandit Away uv J1U immediate SPRINGFiFFn TH Z Z in y ra Franz 18 cashier in a park pa Virfnrv Tnfal Te 1A1 the vihon concession accosted by a V ltlory lOIallS IUI gunman who wantpH thp mntrntr R A joking insisted in his the register Betty however succeeded and he fled 7T X If Landing Forces by Nightfall T SINGAPORE WEAVV FORTIFICATIONS COASTA First Lady Asks Opportunity to Explain Situation in OCD Declares She Did Not Appoint Miss Chancy But Did Suggest Name NAME STANDLEY ENVOY TO REDS Former Chief of Naval Operations Nominated to Moscow by Roosevelt WASHINGTON WP Admiral William H Standlcy former chief of naval operations and now re tired was appointed ambassador to Moscow Monday by President Roosevelt The nomination of the 70 year old naval expect was transmitted lo the senate for confirmation Standlcy would succeed Lau rence Stcinhardt who has been appointed ambassador to Turkey Confirmation of S I a n d 1 c nomination would put a second admiral in the diplomatic corps at a key post Admiral William B Leahy also a former chief of naval operations is ambassador to the French government at Vichy Standley will not be entirely unfamiliar with the problems he will face in the Russian capital since he was a member of an American mission headed by W Averell Harriman which con ferred in Moscow last fall with British and Russian representa tives on means or getting aid to the soviet fighting forces Japs Say Assaulting Forces Are Those Which Landed Earlier iiwi TOKIO From Japanese Broad be pclfecUy de casts Japanese troops if rs IV A S H I N GT O N Franklin D Roosevelt said Mon H f ed if congressmen who have detensc WILLIAM H STANDLEY to Russia American Volunteer Air RANGOON Burma The American volunlcer Flying ligers of Burmas air dc arent you she credited with its ad earnestness the 101st confirmed combat victory activities and moved lo slrip it of authority to direct moralc her to explain the situation The office of civilian defense has been under congressional fire since the appointment of aiclvyn Douelas movie actor nnd Mavris Chancy dancer fricntt of Sirs Roosevelt lo highpaying OCD jobs New congressional criticism de veloped as Ihc house took up a 5100000000 OCD appropriation bill again Mrs Roosevelt assistant direc tor of the OCD told her press conference that she did not di rectly appoint Miss Chancy but had suggested her name She said that she did not appoint Doug las and that questions should be directed to James M Landis ex ecutive officer of OCD concern ing Douglas and to John B Kelly director of the physical fitness division at Philadelphia concern ing Miss Chancy In New York Mayor F II La Guardia director of OCD said he blocked the assignment of Miss I Chancy lo the morale division last December Saying she had not read all lie nciispaper reports of con cessional criticism of the OCD Mrs Roosevelt said that if the remarks were directed to her her answer would be Im wailing to hear from the gentlemen hoping they will give me the courtesy of appcar JnR and discussing it with them They have offices and I have feet Mrs Roosevelt heads the com munity and volunteer participa tion section of the OCD Miss Chancy was placed in charge of childrens activities in the phys ical fitness division There is one inescapable fact that to win this war on the pro duction line we must cut down the number of manhours lost through illness said Mrs Roose velt Physical fitness is one way to do that To win on the military side we must increase the health of our young men Whatever we have been doing in the pasl has produced men lhat arc 50 per cent deficient in health Mrs Roosevelt was asked if the president of OCD has other things anyway when he will be with Director F H La Guardia or Landis started an assault on British po sitions near the Joliore Balirti causeway and the great British naval base on the north shore of Singapore island Domei reported Monday The Japanese were units of forces which landed at the north west corner of the island earlier Monday Three gun emplacements and pill boxes were smashed near the mouth of the Kranji river Dome said The end of the causeway breached by the British after their retreat from Malaya is about two and a half miles cast of the mouth or the river CLAIM LANDINGS MADE FROM UBLN ISLAND BERLIN From German A DNB dis patch fron Tokio declared Mon day that the Japanese had made new successful landings on Singa pore island from Ubin island at the eastern mouth ot Johorc Strait It gave Domci as its au thority and started for over the Japanese air torce Mon day with the discovery of a in wrecked bomber which Robert he even iiari ciamaccrt CAR GOES INTO K1VEK At the death of Olaf Gjelston driver of a car which plunged into L i v 1 1 s automobile landed in five feet of water after overturning in the bankmont oankmcnt on 2 ad street NEAR CAUSEWAY SET UP RULE OVER VESSELS Ship Administration Is Established by F R With Land in Control WASHINGTON Roosevelt Monday established war shipping administration witt virtually allout authority over the nations oceangoing vessels and their cargoes and named Admiral Emory S Land chairman of the maritime commission as head of the new agency The executive order authorizes the G3 year old retired naval of ficer to issue such directives pertaining to shipping operations as he might deem necessary and said his decisions shall be final In his new capacity Lands au thority over shipping appears sim ilar to that of Donald M Nelson over war production The order pointed out however lhat with respect to overseas transportation of cargoes essential to war produc tion and civilian economy Land is to be guided by priority schedules turned over to him by Nelson ioosevelt was asked if the Claims He Wasnt Officially Notified of Change in Time TOKIO ASSERTS CHUTISTS TOOK PARTINATTACK Landing Is Made Under Heavy Artillery and Air Assaults at Night By C YATES McDANIEL SINGAPORE AP De termined defenders of Singa pore rallied for attack to hrow a strong invading iotce of Japanese off theii in battled island Monday aft Ji1 pinning them down to a 10mile front along the west ern swamps and beaches The situation is well in hand tleclared Maj Gen Henry Gordon Bennett com mander ot the A u s t 1 iitns whose sector the Jap anese had clios n for a sur prise night landing We have taken a stand on a strong line nnd are organ izing an attack which it is McDANIEL hoped will recover as much as possible of the lost terrain Tokio broadcasts heard in Oslo declared Japanese parachut ists took part in the battle and reported that the Japanese navy was expected to join in the at tack at any moment in an allout assault on the island Under a hail of British artil lery fire which swept the shal low waters of Johorc strait the Japanese force was virtually be leaguered unable to receive re inforcements it least unlll nightfall Before dark tlie Australians hoped to cut the invaders to pieces This initial force gained its foothold under cover of a wither ing artillery and aerial bombard ment throughout Sunday and all Sunday night The tempo increased violentlv in the night and ragged rows of Japanese special landing boats be gan moving across the shell churned straits in the light of a rising halt moon Plunging into the mangrove swamps and rubber trees and dart ing into tiny inlets which pene trate the shore the Japanese suc ceeded in making good a foothold protected by machincgun nests hidden in a tangle of logs and brush Then only British shells plunged into the mud flats and beaches as bayonet swinging Australians and hardy Indians plunged intn the Ihick of x hinri tohand fight Pushed back to tins last bit of British soil in Malaya in a two months war the defenders were a veritable suicide army for they had little or no chance of escape in event of defeat They had lo throw the Japanese out or accept death There was no talk of surrender While the roar of artillery re verberated across the island sun scorched Australians Indian British Scottish Highlanders and hastily recruited Chinese rushed to mop up the forces which had gained a foothold But it was admitted the Japan ese jungle fighters had succeeded in making penetrations eastward through the mangrove swamps and rubber and apple plantations which border the turgid strait Japanese artillery t h ic k I y Planted alone the opposite shore blasted the defenders positions and raked the island as far as Singapore Cily itself while Japanese dive bqmbers patrolled the skies and strafed the roads James A Gilmorc 64 refuse received any official told persons who mail at war time They waited until the cencral delivery window opened nt war time British artillerymen dueled with the Japanese batteries endeavor ing lo knock out enemy guns with some success against the sought to dominate the air The Japanese landing was ef fected from boats between 1 p m Sunday night 10 a m C S T Sunday and 1 a m Monday under cover of an intense artillery barrage between Sungei Kranii and Pasir Laba west ol the nai   

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