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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: February 3, 1942 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - February 3, 1942, Mason City, Iowa                             NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME D e P A R r u i r HISTORY A N ARC r MO 1NES I A VOL XLVIII ASSOCIATED PRESS AND UNITED PRESS FOW LEASED WIRES FIVE CENTS A COPV THE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS MASON CITY IOWA TUESDAY FEBRUARY 3 1942 TJUS PAPER CONSISTS OF TWO SECTIONS SECTION ONE NO 99 JAP AIR FORCE STRIKES JAVA BASE ic k j 4 S Planes Sink Bombers Attack Singapore i MINOR DEFECTS WONT BAR MEN FROM SERVICE Hershey Declares We Havent Enough Man Power for Everything WASHINGTON Gen Lewis B Hershey selective ser vice director said Tuesday that army entrance standards inevit ably would be lowered as the need for manpower developed and predicted that men with minor de fects would be taken in for lim ited service by the hundred thou sands He appeared before a special house committee investigating mi gration of defense workers and concentrating now on methods of mustering all available manpower lor prosecution of the war effort A prepared statement Hershey brought with him said Allowance and allotment legislation has been proposed and if enacted in proper form it will release for induction many registrants now deferred on the grounds of dependency He noted at one point however that dependency still would re main an outstanding condition of deferment Hershey asserted flatly that competition among the various employers man power must be controlled or eliminated adding Although war industrial pro duction must be maintained it should not be permitted to draw unnecessarily upon the supply of potential 1A men or upon men engaged in war or agricultural production Saying that he was frightened at the American philosophy of abundance Hershey said we havent enough manpower for everything A survey of our manpower he said Vreveals that there are not enough youns 100 per cent perfect men to rill the total manpower requirements of al users of manpower if we con template the possibility of hav ing an armed force of 7000000 or 8000000 men and mate rials to equip it In the near future Hershey told the committee the army will be inducting through selec tive service men from all groups between 20 and 45 He added There is no question but that some of the older men will be as signed to jobs requiring physical strain than those to which the younger men will be assigned From Donald H Davenport of the bureau of labor statistics the committee heard a predic tion that most of the 2200000 places in industry to be vacated within the next nine months by the drafting of men into the armed forces be filled by women Davenport submitted charts es timating the manpower needs in various phases of employment up to the last three months of this year It showed there would be an estimated 2200000 additions to the armed forces For every man that is drawn out of this picture tor the armed forces he said you will have to replace him with a woman or with eligible youths below the draft ago Some replacements he said could come from youths who normally would continue their schooling but because of the emergency will not be able to do so Academic Changes Quickly Made as Iowa State College Adjusts School to War Plan 400 Jap Aliens Had Been in Suspense Glad to Go to Camps LOS ANGELES Born Dr Yoshio Nakaji spokes man for nearly 400 Japanese alien taken into federal custody at Ter minal island said they real wanted to go to concentration camps They have been in sus pense Now they think they wil be moved at once and will remain in one spot until the war is over J SOincent federal bureau o investigation agent said alien Japanese ordered held after a hearing by the enemy alien boan would be given their choice o leaving the country or being in tcrned The alien taken into custody Monday were fishermen and fisi canners EDITORS NOTE This is the second of three articles espe cially prepared for the Iowa Daily Press Association by the presidents of Iowas ihree state supported institutions of higher learning outlining ihe war pro gram each is following By DR CHAKLES E FR1LET of Iowa State College AMES life s usually slow to adjust even to changes in the nations economy but at Iowa State col ege as on many other campuses academic life has undergone a change almost overnight which as placed students and faculty in une with the war effort Those changes and the contri butions of the college to the war effort may be classified as fol ows 1 Expansion of the 12montli year to enable students to e graduated in three instead four years 2 Elimination of vacations to enable June 1942 graduates to their diplomas nine days early 3 Shifting of emphasis in Ihe classroom to keep students alive o the part that they and the sub ect matter they are studying can 3lay in the war effort and opera tion of a student defense council 1 Providing of information and raining useful in the war effort to individuals and agencies in cluding extension effort in the campaigns for food for and improved nutrition 5 Training of technicians for the army the navy and industry and training of students in the civilian pilot training program 6 Research on order from the ivar department and other federal agencies Vacations have been eliminated to speed up the graduation of this years seniors Slight expansion and adjustment of the 12montli school year under which the col lege has operated for 20 years makes it possible forKstudents to be graduated in three years Iowa State was one of the first col leges to expand its offerings af courses for the summer quarter of 1041 in order that seniors might be graduatedahead of time More than 50 students have completed their work one quarter eariies under this program The 12month school year is now arranged so that students en tering as freshmen at 17 years age can complete their college educations before they are called for the draft As an example a freshman entering in June 1842 could complete his four years of college work in three years and be graduated in May 1945 In the classroom the shift In emphnsis haj been gradual and unspectacular but nonetheless real For instance classes in animal husbandry contain day today emphasis on increased agricultural production c e n tered around the food for free dom program Undergraduate in dairy industry empha sizes training in production of evaporated milk cheese and dried milk ivhich the govern ment is requiring in large quan tities In tiie home economics division foods courses constantly point out the part food plays in physical fit ness Some 70 senior girls are preparing to become hospital unusually large class arrangements have been made to enable many of them to complete their work several months before they would nor mally be graduated Other courses in home eco nomics deal with plans for feeding civilian populations in disaster situations Child development courses study methods of caring for children suddenly evacuated from homes and household equip ment students emphasize care and repair of home equipment now irreplaceable because of priori ties Among the engineering students the implication of their usefulness in the war industries is unmis takatjle A majority of the courses in engineering are linked directly to the war effort and a high per centage of each new graduating group goes directly into the war industries Civilian pilot training in co operation with the civil aero nantics authority has been of fered al Iowa State since the fall of 1939 and durins that time 235 different students have been enrolled in cither the primary or secondary flight training or both Of that numhr SS arc DR CHARLES E FRILEY now enlisted in the armed fly ing services In cooperation with the federal office of education the electrical engineering department is con ducting a course in ultrahigh fre quency radio techniques for senioi students in electrical engineering and physics Thirtynine students are now enrolled In the science division courses in history and government which during a year reach 60 per cent of ihe students in college have been intensified to develop an un derstandingof the war issues an appreciation of the American way of life and a recognition of duties and responsibilities in a democ racy Practically every department on Ihe campus is in a position to pro vide information helpful to the war effort either for the armed forces the food for freedom pro gram or civilian morale and de fense And these departments nave been called upon repeatedly by people and agencies of the state to supply that information The college library is serving as a center of technical informa tion and is lending books and periodicals to people both on and off the campus in such di verse fields as nutritional chem istry agricultural economics and aeronautical engineering The library has outstanding collec tions in many scientific fields essential to the war effort AVhile the college has not been turned into an armed camp anc neither has any other campus col lege laboratories and shops have been used to train some 300 arma ment industry technicians Since the spring of 1941 courses have been offered in materials inspec tion anc testing drafting and engineering computations topo graphic surveying and mapping water supply and waste disposal three courses in electrical circuit and their industrial applications and advanced drafting and ele mentary tool design Starting March 3 eightaddi tional courses will be offered on the campus for noncollege stu dents Three will be repetitions o those provided before and five wil be new o radio for technicians elementary mechanics and electricity elemen tary electronics and radio and twc others for radio technicians Al oE these courses are in coopera tion with the federal office of edu cation The engineering extension ser vice has been active in aiding the organization of and provid ing teachers for classes in the training of skilled workers for the arms industry that have been conducted throughout the state The four research institutes o the college have in progress sexera highly specialized investigation for the development of processes and materials to be employed in the armament program These av being conducted in cooperatioi with the war department One activity of the veterinary medicine division that has been carried on for a number of year will prove its usefulness in th plan to increase the production o livestock That is the researci activity and educational campaig in hog sanitation by means o which it is possible for producer to eliminate entirely enteritis their hog herds The agricultural extension scr vice lias now diverted all of it resources to the carrying out c the war program particularly i Hie line of furthering the too for freedom program This scr FIGHT OFF JAPS TRYING TO LAND ON WEST BAT AN MacArthurs Forces CounterAttack Nippon Troops on Right Flank WASHINGTON at empts by the Japanese to land roops on the west coast of Batan peninsula the night of Feb 2 vere repulsed with heavy enemy osses the war department an lounced Tuesday and General Douglas MacArthurs forces also uccessfully counterattacked the Japanese on their right flank iverrumiing three lines of enemy renches The landing attempts on Mac Arthurs left consisted of a first raid by Tatori special shock troops which were repulsed by artillery fire and a second and more serious attempt at mid night when American night f ly ing pursuit planes discovered a large number of barges ap proaching the coast under naval escort The planes attacked the convoy mmediately with light bombs and nachine guns and as the enemy troops approached the shore the American and Filipino beach de fense force attacked them with artillery None of the barges reached shore although a num per were found disabled and burn ng along the beaches the next morning The text of the communique ATo 90 of the war based on re ports received here up to a m eastern standard time Tues day 1 Philippine theater Two Japanese attempts to lane troops on the west coast of Batan ivere broken up during the nigh of February 2 1942 The first raid by the Tatori group or special shock troops wai made early in the evening This was frustrated by our artillery five A second and more serious at tempt was made at midnight large number of barges under naval escort approached the coast The raid was discovered by a few of our flying pursuit planes whiel immediatelyattacked the convoy with light bombs and machine gun fire As the enemy troops ap proached the shore our beach defense force attacked with ar tillery and machine guns The Japanese force suffered heavy casualties in men and boats On following morning a number of disabled barges were found along the beaches Some of these were burning and others were adrift None of the invading group reached shore W Ground operations on our let flank were of a minor character The frontal pressure of the Jap anese 16th Kimura division in this sector relaxed Some enemy pockets found where isolated groups of Japanese soldier mopped up are being On our right where General Naras 65th division had previ ously attempted by a frontal at tack to drive a wedge between our forces we made a successful counterattack Our troops over ran three lines of enemy trenches capturing considerable equip ment the past 24 hours there has been moderate enemy air ac tivity in support of ground action In the recent fighting in the Philippine Brig Gen Clinton A Pierce United States army was slightly wounded in action 2 There is nothing to report from other areas vice has taken an active cart in the statewide nutrition campaign Dr P Mabel Nelson head of the college foods and nutrition de partment is state chairman of the nutrition campaign and 85 Iowa counties now have a going pro gram Students on the campus have organized a student defense coun cil that has enlisted the aid of all of the 5900 students in such activ ities as education for war collec Debris From Raids Quickly leared Away Java Henfh M V NOA is AmboinaA line protectedbar tenain make it a tough island for attackers PHILIPPINE ISLANDS pacific DARWIN bses form a defensive triangle which the united nations hope will halt Japans drive into the south Pacific Iwo of the bases Soerabaja and Amboina are Dutch and the third Darwin is British Civil Flying Boat Downed 13 Are Killed MELBOURNE a p a n ee fighter planes brought down an Australian civilian flying boat killing 13 persons in an attack Friday near the Timor island port of Koepang it was disclosed Tues day This apparently was the rea son for an unexplained announce ment Monday that empire air mail from Australia had been sus pended foithe time being tion of usable waste production of knitted materials materials conduct of first aid and ambulance driver courses and student con tributions to war relief organiza tions Next Iowa State Teachers Col leges war program as outlined by President Malcolm Weather Report FORECAST MASON CITY Slightly warmer Tuesday afternoon and nisht IOWA Somewnat warmer Tuer day afternoon little change in temperature Tunsday night MINNESOTA Somewhat warmer south and east snow flurries east portion Tuesday afternoon somewhat colder Tuesday night IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics Maximum Montay 26 Minimum Monday night 17 At 8 a m Tuesday 25 YEAR AGO Maximum 23 Minimum By NIGHT BASEBALL GAMES DOUBLED SPOUTS NEW YORK major league baseball clubs Tuesday voted to increase the night game limit from seven to 14 games at the home park of each club with the exception of the Washington Senators who were granted 21 night Discovers His Birth Certificate Reported He Died at Birth AMARILLO Texas though he has legal proof that he vas born 2 ycars ago Davis L army Harris must convince the that he still is alive Planning to join the army air corps Harris applied al the city health department lor a copy of his birth certificate Why youre dead the clerk said It says right here you died at Buy your defense savings stamps from your Globe Gazette carrier boy or at the GG business office Forde Big Allied Move Under Way Minister Francis forcte told the Australian forces overseas in a broadcast Tuesday that sday that a big movement by the allies is under way Addressing especially the men of the Australianimperial force at Singapore Forde declared that each hour that the Japanese are held at bay permits the concentration and de ployment of more reinforcements and the accumulation of more weapons rifc not mv wmls lo inPc you therefore to hold on he said C YATES McDAMEL SINGAPORE after wave of Japanese bombers hurled ligh explosives at this great Brit sh bastion Tuesday while Nip ponese troops concentrated at the tip of conquered Malaya for an attempt to storm the island With imperial forces drawn up along the mile wide moat of Jo lorc strait and watchful around he entire 70 mile perimeter of this stronghold firemen and police iverc kept busy throughout the nterior controlling fires lit by the Japanese bombs In the section of Singapore city which bore the brunt of Tuesday mornings bombing authorities and ARP squads cleared away the debris within a few minutes to make way for fire which quickly played water on a number of high leaping lircs one of the shirt sleeved civilians who vvas laying hose straightened up for a moment I recognized Sir Shenton Thomas governor of the Straits Settle ments He was working along side scores of natives n Nearby Lieut Gen A E Per cival commander of the defending army forces was directing men removing valuable materials from a warehouse in the path of the flames Singapores civilians and ranking military men plunged un hesitatingly into the most danger ous spots to localize the damage Everyone from the governor and general down lo the lowliest coolie bent to his tasks with vigor Aside from the air attack vir tually no military action worthy of mention occurred during this fourth day of siege The big cuns noised along the narrow Johorc strait lired in termittently but so far ihe tar gets have been well concealed The gloomy wail of air raid sirens filled the air off and on throughout the day RAF reconnaissance showed considerable movement of enemy troops southward through the lush green Malaya jungles Two separate formations of bombers one numbering nine planes and the other 27 swept over the island during the morn ins in a switt hitrun attack Confident of their ability to make the invaders pay dearly foi a mass assault across Johorc strait imperial forces kept sharp watch to thwart any repetition ol the sly infiltration tactics which forced them to yield the Malayan mainland but there was no sign yet of any ground activity Bombipg activity however described by a commu niciue as considerable during the last 24 hours high level and divebomb attacks being carried oul and causing some fires Nevertheless it added military casualties were slight The British countering the aerial blow with a bomber smash at riuang on the Malay peninsu la above the Johorc strait car ried out a lowaltitude attack 01 the JapancscIield airdrome anc on enemy motor transport A Rome broadcast of Tokio re ports said Japanese artillery wa subjecting British positions to a heavy bombardment with Britisl naval guns silenced at one pom and the great naval base and docks rendered useless by th shelling Twenty ships of various size are in Kcppcl harbor on Singa pore waterfront nt Die south sid of the island Japanese pilots re ported crArvr OFFENSIVE TO BK LAUNCHED SOON TOKIO from Japanese broad Col Hotlo Japanese military spokesman sai Tuesday at a press confercnc that a Japanese general offcnsiv against Singapore fortress woul be launched soon according t careful plans He declared it would not lak long now to oust the rcmainin United States forces from Bata peninsula in the Philippines dc ppitc the fact they are occupyin favorable positions in mountains and thick forests whir make Japanese attack difficult Foreign reports that the Jap anese are being forced continual to bring up reinforcements fo this attack were called complet nonsense TRYTO CRIPPLE ALLIED PLANES STRIKING FORCE Soerabaja Base Vital to British Dutch and U S for Operations D HANCOCK Commands Armored Division BATAVIA N E I apanesc air forces smashed at oerabaja the Indies great naval ase and its flanking air fields ucsday in an evident attempt cripple the united nations riling power in the wake of an merican aerial attack which ank two and possibly three ore invasion transports in Ma assar strait It was tile first enemy thrust at Java one of the strongholds of the Indies defense and the Dutch acknowledged that the raiders had scored some damage to naval establishments at Soerabaja which lies close to the southern sale of Macassar strait and to a few aircraft lyingon the water Aueta news agency however aid antiaircraft batteries and mobile antiaircraft guns defend ng the base went into instant ction and bagged at least one tombcr and several fighter planes iscorting the 26 bombers in the enemy avmada The main objectives of the raid ers military observers told the Dutch agency undoubtedly were to cripple the Soerabaja base whose mportancc fo the united nations 11 the Pacific has become para nount now that Singapore is un der siege and to incapacitate air iclds there at Malang Madoien and Magelan Like Soerabaja ilself all fields arc at the disposal nr united nation forces now in lava and arc a serious menace to Japanese operations They lie along an arc from the port of Reinbans nbout 100 miles west of Soerabaja to Malanz the same distance to the southeast Ttembang also was ombcd The first war bulletin said no letails were available except that here had been rather consider able damage to material and a upplcmenl mentioned only the specific damage lo planes and naval establishments at Soerabaja Aneta said that there were no casualties and only slight damage o the Malang field and that it still was in use Two Japanese transports are known to have been destroyed and a third probably was sunk Monday in the strait off Balik fapan Dutch East Borneo in two thrusts by TJ S aircraft said a communique tran smittcd through Batavia from the allied Ecncral headquarters on Java II was in the same strait that Dutch and United Stales air and invi forces had already destruc tively attacked a huge invasion armada sinking and damaging lota estimated as liighas 46 ships Moreover it was said that dur ing the past few days allied air craft carrying oul reconnaissance on shipping in IMacassar strait shot down a total of nine enemy aircraft for a loss of one of our own and Dutch aircraft shot down a hostile machine in an other part of the area In addition to these special operations said the communique the fourth to be issued from the Java offices of Gen Sir Archibald P Wavell normal attacks on enemy airdromes and bases have been carried out with satisfactory results over the area between Malaya and the East Celebes Dutch observers said the Jap anese raids upon the airports of Soerabaja the largest naval base of all the Netherlands In dies and other cities might be tlic prelude lo an invasion at tempt The Japanese already have in vested parts of Borneo 300 miles lo the north The Netherlands Indies command said many fight ers accompanied the bombers for the attacks upon Soerabaja Ma lang and Madioen and on the vil lage of Magctan Rather considerable damage lo material was inflicted and some OTTAWA Fred crick F Worthington has been raised to the rank of major Ron oral and given command of Can ada new armored division na tional defense headquarters an nounced Tuesday persons were seriously the communique reported Some damage to naval estab lishments and a few aircraft Iv inK on the water was acknowl edged Japanese bombed and machine gunned Embang another smal   

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