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Mason City Globe Gazette: Friday, January 23, 1942 - Page 1

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - January 23, 1942, Mason City, Iowa                             DEPARTMENT HISTORY AN I v NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME VOL XLVII1 THE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS MASON CITY IOWAFRIDAY JANUARY 23 1942 THIS PAPER CONSISTS OF TWO SECTIONS SECTION ONE NO 90 JAPS LAND TROOPS IN NEW GUINEA 1 Dutch Flyers Back Jap Attacks AAiirrnpfvt in TIIT i i CONFEREES PUT12 Billion Quickly voted mUTDni by House for Construction tUHIKUL of 33000 New U S Warplanes BILL IN HOUSE AmendmentPatched Measure Represents Several Compromises I 9 sS A S H I N G T O N W An amendmentpatched wartime price control measure which some spon sors said may prove more un popular than new taxes was ready for final congressional ac tion Friday Weary senatehouse conferees agreed on its terms Thursday night after nearly two weeks of legislative blanket pulling which ended in adjustment of wide dif ferences between the two cham bers congress and the white house Representative Steagall D Ala who teamed with two democratic colleagues to break Ihe conference deadlock pre dicted hat the house would ac cept the bill as amended in conference because there were compromises on boih sides Senate approval likewise was foreseen by Senators Brown D Mich and Bankhead DAla Brown who said the measure might prove even less popular than taxes estimated that food costs might rise as much as 11 to 15 per cent under the compro mise measure because of restric tions placed on farm price ceilings Even so I think this is a good he said It has the and uncontrolled price rises Bankhead who sponsored the amendment to give the secretary of agriculture a virtual veto power over price ceilings of farm prod ucts was jubilant over ence acceptance of this provision President Roosevelt openly op posed the restriction although of ficials noted that the chief execu tive always had an ace in the hole because both the price ad ministrator and the secretary ol agriculture serve only at his pleasure Mrr Roosevelt asked for a price control law last July in a special message warning against ihe dangers ofinflation and added costs to ihe armament program The house passed a price control bill in November before war broke out and the senate passed its widely ferent version hree weeks ago The compromise set prices dur ing the period Oct 1 to 15 of last year as standards for the price ceilings with the exception of farmprices In this field the price administrator could not fix ceilings or order reductions be low the highest of these Average farm prices on Oct i or Dec 15 of last year average farm prices for the period 191329 or 110 per cent of parity prices determined by the department of agriculture Senator Brown predicted that the last restriction would soon be the only one because parity price to give a iair exchange value to farm prod as the costs of things the farmer buys increase Parity prices in most cases are based upon the ratio prevailing between prices of farm products and other goods in the years 190914 2 Married Sisters and Man Are Found Dead on Baltimore Road BALTIMORE mar ried sisters one of them shot and the other stabbed and an uniden tified man also shot were found dead early Friday on a bushlined roadside near Catonsville Balti more suburb Baltimore county police report ing they found neither knife nor pistol near the scene said it was possible the women and the man were slain elsewhere and their bodies dumped beside the road The women were identified as Mrs Helen Johnson 21 and her sister Mrs Irene Carter 32 1 st Lady Sents Flowers to Girl Fatally Hurt CLEVELAND white house Friday sent 20 pink carna tions and 20 yellow roses to the family of Mary Ann Kovacs 9 fatally injured Tuesday by an au tomobile while pulling her wagon in search of old paper for her schools war salvage program The flowers bore the personal card of Mrs Eleanor Roosevelt Designed to Maintain Rate of Production WASHINGTON un precedented ap propriation for 33000 new war planes was approved by the house with little debate Friday and sent to the senate No opposition developed in de bate to the huge fund but argu ment over an additional 000 appropriation for the contro versial Douglas power dam in the Tennessee Valley Authority de layed for a while passage of the omnibus measure About 15 per cent of the big appropriation uould be spent on planes themselves and the rest would be allocated to plant ex pansion facilities armor am munition and radio explosive and incendiary supplies At the last minute the house added 80p000 for state depart ment foreign service transporta tion costs Opening debate on the unpre cedented larg est single military fund in the his tory Can non DMo of the house appro priations committee told his col leagues The whole issue of this de pends on taking and holdiiig con trol of the air in every theater of the war Until we have secured con trol over Ihe Russian front the Mediterranean arid 4kelaciiic wejcan not btrin bnr flrststep toward winning the war Cannon said the fact that the measure was ready for debate only lour days after President Roosevelt requested it indicated the unity and unanimity of con gress and the American people in support of the administration and of the defense program He noted that the 33000 planes to be provided would by no means achieve President Roosevelts goal year and This is not lo carry out lliat part of the presidents program Cannon said The principal pur pose is to continue production at the present rate Unless this money is provided we will reach a peak of production in August His voiced lowered as he told the house that General MacAr thurs gallant little force of men defending the stars and stripes on Luzon were not worried about the cost of materials that they wanted only the tools with which to fight In response to a question con cerning the nations total planes Cannon said he could not dis close secret testimony before he committee But he added If we had sufficient airplanes the enemy never would have landed in the Philippines the British wouldnt have lost two capital ships Singapore wouldnt be fighting a last desperate bat tle and the problem of defend ing Australia would be disposed of Strong indorsement of the plane program likewise came from the republican side of the attentive house Representative Taber RNY ranking minority committeeman who has been ill received an ova tion as he strode to the well the house He said The critical situation our forces in the far cast are facing is suf ficient argument for passage of funds to implement our war ac tivity to any immediate extent Buy your defense savings stamps from rtur GlobeGazette carrier boy or at the GG business office RUSSIANS GAIN 7 MILES A DAY IN CENTER LINE Try to Outflank Nazis Near Leningrad Axis Advances in Libya By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Russias victorious red armies repeating the triumphs their for bears scored against Napoleon in 1812 drove the Germans 23 miles west of Mozhaisk in a sevcn milesaday advance Friday while on the north African front British desert troops underwent a startling reverse Coupled with their smashing triumph on the Moscow front Russian troops advancing in a blinding snowstorm launched a drive to outflank the nazi armies before Leningrad Dispatches said the Russians took the Germans by surprise in an attack on the 40mile sector between Novgorod just north of Lake Ilmen and the Moscow Leningrad railroad resulting in the most violent fighting of the pewyearl i v southern Ukraine front a late bulletin reported that Marshal Semeon Timoshenkos armies were continuing to ad vance along a 100mile line be tween Kursk and Kharkov Rus sias Pittsburgh To the north soviet troops were said to have recaptured 44 towns and villages in the Orel sector 210 miles below Moscow and it was reported that Orel itself en circled for the past fortnight may already have fallen British middle east headquar ters acknowledged that axis mechanized forces striking SO miles northeastward from El Agheila had recaptured Aged abia and it was apparent that Gen Erwin Rommel had begun a fullfledged counteroffensive Agedabia the scene of a brief axis stand after General Rommels armies had been thrown back 300 miles from the EgyptianLibyan frontier is 80 miles south of Ben gasi on the Gulf of Sirte A Cairo bulletin said axis troops screened by a swirling red sandstorm lunged forward from the Mersa Brega sector 25 miles northeast of El Agheila on the second day of what was described as a reconnaissance in force Thursday By evening our light forces had withdrawn east of Agcdabia which the enemy occupied Brit ish headquarters said Astonished by the setback at the peak of the British drive to ward Trlpolitania London mili tary quartet suggested heavy aerial reinforcements must have reached the Germans and Ital ians These quarters said the mention of light forces withdrawing from Agedabia indicated the main British force had not yet at tempted to stop General Rom mels counterdrive The German high command re ported briefly that German and Italian troops are following up the defeated enemy and claimed the destruction or capture of 10 British tanks 46 guns and more than 100 vehicles stretches SELF DES M01NES I made it n I Iowa with the ejacula It had been a hard fight Jack he was known by himself and others has been trying for weeks to be come a marine The son of Mrs Alice Maruth Jack hitchhiked to the Cedar Rap ids substation for enlistment He was okay except for height He measured 5 feet 3i inches The minimum is 5 feet 4 inches Jack a graduate of IOWR City high school where he played foot ball did stretching exercises at the University of Iowa fieldhouse and over for a week Then back to Cedar Rapids He still was too short But the recruiting officer gave him a word of hope Back to the gym again for an other week of stretching Then to DCS Moines And he made it At Parley in Rio Sumner Welles left United States undersecretary of state and Enrique Ruiz Guinazu right Argentine foreign minister appear here during the PanAmerican conference at Rio de Janeiro Deadline for Argentina to Agree to Join in Break Faces Ultimatum to Join Other Americas or Stand by Herself RIO DE JANEIRO A vir tual ultimatum that Argentina join the other American nations in breaking diplomatic relations with the axis or sit out the war in iso lation without benefit of the de fense measures of her neighbors expires Friday Tile deadline is Friday after noon The coordinating committee of the emergency conference of American foreign ministers con fers at 4 p m after which the main political committee was scheduled to act on the relations breaking resolution with or with out Argentina Every other republic includ ing Chile was ready to sign an authoritative source disclosed Chiles enthusiasm was cool for a week but the Chilean govern ment Thursday authorized its foreign minister Juan B Kos sctti to accept the redrafted resolution The Argentine foreign minister Enrique Ruiz Guinazu had ac cepted the which provid ed that each nation must have he approval of its congress or execu tive branch before finally sever ing relations but his government ordered him to reject it He had been sent to Rio de Janeiro with full powers which now have been reduced Argentina balked at two words in Hie revised resolution It said the American nations cannot continue diplomatic relations with the axis because of its ag gressions The Argentine govern ment wanted it to read The American nations can discon tinue diplomatic relations Had the other nations agreed to the rewording their emer gency conference would have been for nothing because It was pointed out any nation not under the hetl of the axis can discontinue diplomatic rela tions any time it wants Argpntine observers were an gered by the denunciation of Sen ator Tom Connally D Texas chairman of the foreign relations committee of Argentinas attitude It was known that the United States delegation regarded Con nallys statement as having been made at the worst possible time In Washington Secretary of State Cordell Hull made its unofficial nature clear Reports spread that Germany and probably he other members of the axis had warned Brazil anew that a diplomatic break would be regarded as a declara tion of war i Attempted Raid of 60 Planes at Rangoon Fails RANGOON Burma PjAmer ican and British flyers smashed mass air raids by more than GO Japanese planes on the Rangoon area Friday and shot down about onethird of the attacking force Fridays air battle saw the Yankee volunteers go sailing into Vformations of enemy bombers an action that brought the Jap anese fighter plane escorts down into a dogfight in which the Jap anese were believed to have lost at least 17 planes Tiie bombers were forced to jettison their loads to escape the sh a r kfinned Americanbuilt Toiiimyhawk Curtiss planes BATTLE RAGES ON BATAN JAP ATTACK FIERCE United States Forces Fight Off Reinforced Nipponese Troops WASHINGTON Douglas MacArthurs forces arc stubbornly blasting back at con tinuous extremely heavy Japa nese attacks and have inflicted a large casualty toll on ihe enemy troops the war department report ed Friday The communique reported that the biffgesl American war action since Ar raged for the past 21 hours as the reinforced Japanese troops smashed again and affain at flie short American positions on Batan peninsula Japanese losses were reported heavy and the U S troops were said lo have beaten off every at tack thus far launched The communique revealed that the Japanese apparently have placed their offensive on a 24 hour continuous basis hoping to wear down the American and Fili pino troops by their superiority in numbers The war department said also that Gen Sir Archibald Wavell supreme commander of the south Pacificfor the united na tions has sent MacArthur a mes sage warmly congratulating him and his command for their mag nificent defense of the Philip Describing tiie combat opera tions the war department said The fighting has been extreme ly heavy The enemys assault troops have been strongly rein forced Nevertheless all Japanese attacks have been repulsed with heavy losses Apparently the en emy has adopted a policy of con tinuous assaults without regard to casualties hoping by great su periority in numbers to crush the defending forces How long the outnumbered American forces ran hold out under the storm of Japanese at is backed up by the full resources of Japans 14th army plus special units and constantly arriving reinforce not certain LAUDS STUDENTS ATTITUDE IOWA CITY are more intelligent about the war nowthan they were in 1D17 Presi catuits uovvn dent Virgil M Handler of thr from their protecting cloudbanks University of I o a belicve inin a rnpf wht in J i r otivvto Young people after the last wa had a tendency to relax and let the world take care of itself he said in nn interview The present generation must be prepared tackle unknown determination1 problems with Direct BATAVIA N E I heavy bombers and divebombers scored 12 direct hits on eight Jap anese warships and transports in the Macassar Straits between Ihe islands of Borneo and Celebes it was announced officially Friday A communique released through the news agency Ancta said tiOO pound bombs were dropped direct ly on a large warship a heavy cruiser a smaller cruiser and a large transport while divcbomb ers scored with their 175pound bombs on a destroyer and three transports The Dutch suffered no losses it was announced Such a force of Japanese war ships in those waters indicated the Japanese might be sending a fleet of perhaps to Balik Papan on the east coast of Borneo where the Dutch have destroyed valuable oil wells and oil stores The Netherlands East Indies command announced in its regular communique that Dutch aircraft Friday attacked Kuching Jap aneseoccupied capital of Sarawak against bombing storage yards which were set on fire The Dutch also said 27 enemy fighters attacked the airdrome at Palembang on the island of Su matra Friday m o r n in g and wounded two persons During a light bombardment at Sabang an island off the northern lip of Sumatra a small abandoned ship was sunk the Dutch said They added attempts to bomb two more ships failed Sixteen persons were Injured and some sheds and ships were damaged in two Japanese air raids Thursday on tho tobacco port of Belawan near Mcdan in Sumatra a communique said AUSTRALIA NOW IN DIRECT PATH OF NEW THRUST United States Routes to Pacific War Zone Jeopardized by Move By KOGEK D GREENE Associated Press War Editor Japans marcli of conquest struck directly toward Aus tralia Friday as sea borne Japanese troops landed in New Guinea the Solomon islands and New Britain in a sweep jeopardizing not only the land down under but also United States routes to the Pacific war zone 1VAS IN YVUIIU NEW YORK Jessie L Wolcott of Spirit Lake Iowa is one of nine Methodist missionaries who were in Uuhu China at the outbreak of hostilities between the United States and Japan and have been interned by the Japanese Hie Methodist church board of missions and church extension an nounced Weather Report FORECAST IOWA Continued mild tempera tures Friday afternoon and Fri day night MASON CITY No precipitation continued mild Friday afternoon and Friday night IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics Maximum Thursday 43 Minimum Thursday night 21 At 8 i m Friday 30 YEAR AGO Maximum 20 Minimum n Japs Launch Another Invasion PACIFIC OCEAN NEW IRELAND MERAUKE Arafura Sea Peninsula COOKTOWN AUSTRALIA Coral Sea jft D A D EZa soo MILES AT EQUATOR sjsMed off Rabaul capital of lie Australian At ils nearest paint New Guinea is only JOO miles across j Torres strait from Cape York northernmost tip of Australia In general the news was dark from all fronts in the far Pa cific conflict relieved only by word from Washington that the United States was beginning tn pour a stream of reinforcements into wiiat has been until now a lopsided struffslc Critical hours again were at hand in the battles of Malaya and Burma Dutch heavy bombers and fight ers lashed out at the Mikados in vasion hordes swarming into the Soutlu Sea island scoring12 di rect bits on eight Japanese war ships and transports in the Strait of Macassar between Dutch Bor neo and Celebes island Military strategists emphasized the triple menace of Japans new est thrusts 1 The war has been brought lo territory wilhin easy striking distance of Australia 2 Japan has forged a new link her chain of bases stretching south and cnst for 500 miles from Tokio to the Solomon is lands 3 The united nations supply lines to the Dutch East Indies Singapore Burma and China have been sharply endangered From bases in New Guinea and m Ihe 750 mile long Solomon chain to the east Japan may now command ihe vital Torres strait between Australia and New Guinea and force allied shipping into a 3000 mile detour south of the Australia mainland fn swift alarm Australia or dered blackouts in alt cities militia units were equipped with full battle dress and the com monwealth war cabinet was called in emcrRcncy session Ur Jrcnt new appeals ivcrc sent In Washington and London stress ing Ihe need for reinforcements The locale nf the Japanese land ing in New Guinea was not given but presumably the invaders put ashore near oftbombed Madang on the northeast coast 450 miles airline from Cape York Australia and 1200 miles from Australias great Port Darwin naval base Deputy Prime Minister Francis Fordc warning that we must realize the gravity of he situa tion said it was assumed that ihe Japanese had also landed at Rabaul New Britain island where the British garrison had with drawn after firing and dynamit ing dock installations at the ap proach of a Japanese flotilla of U ships late Thursday Subsequently Fordc announced that the only confirmed landing in the Bismarck archipelago which includes New Britain New Orcland and small adjacent isles was at Keito 250 miles southeast of riabaul A fleet of commercial carrying double loads evacuated 800 women and children from Ra baul in the last tew hours before the Japanese landed there In Tokio Premier Gen Hidcki Tpjo boaslcd that Japan was as sured of further triumphs in greater East Asia and de clared I am not afraid of America althouKh I do not dismiss tightly the huge mililary expenditure called for in President Roost vclts message to congress Tojo asserted that in manpower Japan tops the world On ihe Malayan front the Mel bourne radio broadcast a message from MajGcn Govdon Bennett Australian commander frankly conceding that ihe situation il   

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