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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: November 12, 1941 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - November 12, 1941, Mason City, Iowa                             NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME COJip DCPARTUCNT Of HISTORY ANO ARCHIVES DES HO I HE3I A THI NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS VOL XLVIII MASON CITY IOWA WEDNESDAY THIS PAPEB CONSISTS OP TWO SECTIONS HOME EDITION MASON CITY ipyjmjHiMotsymcuARo MHess Hitler Planned to Starve iwarmiNazis Reach DWC I CHEERS HEARD FOR CHURCHILL REPORTONWAR li Prime Minister Says Britain Can Operate Overseas in 1943 LONDON Ministe j Churchill declared Wednesda 5 Adolf Hitler hadfailed to brin Britain to her knees through starvation blockade and thus migh be forced into attempting invasioi i as soon as he can screw up hi j courageand make arrangement j to take the plunge The prime minister told a cheer teg house of commons that it ha been learned through Britain rj No 1 prisoner Rudolf Hess wh W flew from Germany to Scotland that Hitler originally counte J i more on starvation of the Britis1 Jj than on invasion Any such hopes Churchill de Glared crumbled throughan im provement in Britains shippin situationThis was highspottei bythe prime ministers repor u that 1ATn 1943 we shall have sufficient shipping to undertake overseas operations 1000000 tons of axis shipping were sent to the bottom or damaged seriously in the four months ending in Octo ber that same period Britains shipping losses dropped almost twothirds for Britains workers would result from an improvemen in exports and bigger crops a home but he added Satisfactory as the results are i there must he no relaxation of ou i efforts not only because of tht i everpresent menace to importa tionjrom abroad but it may yet be that as the wardevelops militar operations may make more exten sive demands upon our shipping He did not elaborate that theme to explain whether such military operations be in Africa or in the movement of troops for action on the Russian front He avoided all mention of the governments frequently criticized aid to Russia Durine the speech which fol lowed the formal opening of the new session of parliament by King George Churchill flatly told critics he did not intend to change hb cabinet at the pres ent moment He promised however fullest facilities for war debate not only this week but the whole of next week and into the week there alter He said we are entitled to seek from commons from time to time a formal renewal of their confidence ana added that the debate would furnish the signa opportunity of the as a grand inquest of the nation into tne government The king wearinr his uniform as admiral of the fleet said the parliamentary session has been memorable for the strengthen ing of already close ties between my government and peoples and United States of America The United States be said is furnishing my peoples and my allies with war supplies of ali Kinds on a scale unexampled i history My peoples are determined to meet to the utmost of their power the needs of the soviet union in its heroic conflict Developments in the far east have engaged the close attention of my government and it has been necessary to increase the forces VICHY France UPJ Charles Huntziger minister of war in the Vichy cabinet was burned to death withseven other persons in an enroute to ippe Petain on liis importantin spection tour of north which defend those regions Commons was told later common people swear Pmrchill even through swear at his government my territories in that by they Hambro States Peace Problems to Be Terrific ST PAUL Hambro former president of the Norwegian parliament suggests a cooling off period after the conclusion of Me presentwar before final peace terms are drawn Speaking before Macalester college student and faculty members Hambro said problems of the next peace are going to be terrific The prob Joms would be economic and so cial rather than political he said German Trucks Target for Bombs r Huntziger Vichy Minister of War Dies in Plane Crash 7 Others Lose Lives When Ship Returning From Africa Falls Huntziger a slight dapper man and a pilot with more than 3000 flying hours to his credit had been on a 7500 mile flight in Africa where he saw Gen Max ime Weygand the Vichy pro consul There had been reports that Huntzigers report toPetain might decide whether Vichy would yield to German demands for ouster of Weygand who has Deen regarded as strongly opposed to the axis program in Africa Two members of the war office staff were believed to be on the plane with Huntziger when it crashed near Le Vigan about 100 miles northwest of Marseilles aft er a fhght across the Mediter ranean in bad weather from Al giers Huntziger scheduled to see Pe i kte Wednesday signed the 1940 armistice between France and Germany GENERAL HUNTZIGER Locomotive Tosses Truck 100 Feet to Top of Waiting Car WHITE BEAR LAKE Minn Lundgren driving a ruck tried to beat a train to crossing The locomotive struck the truck and hurled it 100 feet through the air The truck landed atop an automobile which was waiting for the train to pass Lundgren and the two occu pants of the waiting automobile climbed from the wreckage with out a scratch The truck body torn off by the mpact skimmed across the top f the automobile in which Oscar Johnson and John H Krongable both of St Paul were sitting The truck chassis and cab with clinging to the seat andcd on the hood of Johnsons machine The car and the truck were demolished None was hurt but Lundgren vas arrested for careless driving JUOeEDJET WHILE HUNTING Wood of Waterloo Collapses in Field From Heart Disease MARSHALLTOWN eorge W Wood of Waterloo udge ot the tenth Judicial district Iowa collapsed while hunting heasants on the Henry Duddcn arm just north of Grundy Cen er Wednesday morning He was ead by the time his hunting com anions reached him Coroner L Coffman said death was caused y heart disease LUNGER ADMITS PAYING But Says Payment to Judges Son Was for Services to Friend WASHINGTON UPJ Senator William Lahger Rr N Dak ad mitted Wednesday that he paid 275 to Gale Wyman son of a fed eral judge before whom he ap peared as defendant on a conspir acy charge but explained the payment covered past services by Wyman to one of Langers associates Testifying before the senate privileges and elections committee hearing on a petition for his re moval from the senate Langer declared that the payment to Wy man was made for past services rendered to James Mulloy for merly an intimate political ally Langer told the committee that much to his surprise Wyman was brought to his home by Mulloy during the course of a conspiracy trial before Wymans father We talked in the basement den of my said Mul loy got up and walked out after which Wyman and myself talked about 10 minutes I told him I had adequate counsel and his services were not needed I was very anxi ous to get him out of town and wanted nothing to do with him Langer said Wyman told me that Multoy had promised him for past services but had paid only for the plus S25 expenses for coming to my home from South Dakota I agreed and wrote a check for the amount to Mulloy Armored Forces Asked If Theyll Go Abroad WITH ARMY IN THE FIELD The war department is asking members of the armored force whether they would be willing to overseas it was disclosed Wednesday Several enlisted men and officers in one of the armored ilvisions participating in the Caro lina maneuvers said they had been queried Would you be willing to serve overseas with an armored division Only a or no answer was desired PEORIA III men were reported missing and believee dead when the plant of the Western irwrnerjjeompjiny upv Wed with hear 40niiles No other casualties ported r Information from the plant lo cated in hilly country west of Pepria was that every building but the administration buildini was destroyed in a double explo sion A small blast was followed almost instantly by a mammoth roar The black powder mill was en gaged in defense work and federal officials took charge Some Peorians thought broken windows and china were signs of an earthquake In panic they put m calls for the fire department jamming telephone lines Bioff and Browne Sentenced to Prison on Extortion Charges NEW YORK Judge John C Knox Wednesday sen tenced William Bioff to 10 years in prison and a 520000 fine and George E Browne to eight years and for violation of the federal antiracketeering law Browne former president of the International Alliance of Theatri cal Stage Employes AFL and Bioff his personal representative were convicted of extorting about from the motion picture industry The government charged they had used their labor leadership to extort large sums on threat of strike SET RAILROAD STRIKE DATES Chiefs of 5 Operating Brotherhoods Order Action for Dec 7 CHICAGO Chiefs the e five operating brotherhoods in the railroad industry ordered their SoOOOO members Wednesday to strike beginning Dec7 for a 30 Jer cent increase in wages The men were instructed to leave their obs progressively on Dec 7 8 and 9 Byram Former Head of Milwaukee Dies FAIRFJELD Conn Harry Byram 75 prominent railroad executive died Tuesday after a icre He was chairman of the ipard and formerly president of he Milwaukee railroad but had been in virtual retirement since he line went into receivership six fears ago A PAYS PENALTY DubuqueMan H COAL MINEBebwKerch FOR TRYING TO Jl I AIAHIIW n Found Dead Beside Road DUBUQUE The body of Dan Patch 49 operator of the Patch beverage company of East Dubuque was found on the shoul der of highway 52 near villc at oclock Wednesday morning and Sheriff Leo J Eis bach said indications were that he had been struck by an auto mobile The discovery of Patchs body was made by his wife who the sheriff said was returning to Sageville to pick up her husband after leaving him there several hours before County Coroner C C Coady said a postmortem examination revealed that death had resulted from multiple fractures of the ribs and a punctured liver Both shoul ders also were broken he said The sheriff said an investigation indicated that Patch had been struck by a hitandrun automo bile while walking along the highway He said he had no clue as to the identity of the driver whose car hit Patch Patch was widely known in the puouque trade area both through his business connections ard sponsorship of baseball teams He was prominent in American Leg ion circles and was commander of the Dubuque posts drum and bu gle corps for many years H served with the Canadian forced during the first World war SKIES CLEAR FOR HUNTING SEASON Tens of Thousands of Hunters Flock to Fields for Pheasants DES MOINES WBlue skies speedy birds The 1941 Iowa pheasant hunting season opened at noon Wednesday under clear skies and with tem peratures slightly above normal levels Tens of thousands of Iowa hunt ers flocked to the cornfields and brush pi 5314 counties to match wits with the fastmoving upland game birds The season will last seven days The stale conservation commis sion reported one arrest night in the Spirit Lake region A hunter who couldnt wait for the season to open officially was the description given of the defendant The weather bureau predicted fair weather Wednesday night and Thursday The shippers forecast predicted a minimum of 28 in northwest Iowa Wednesday night 34 in the northeast and southwest and 38 in the southeast Child Putting Scraps From Paper Dolls Into Stove Dies of Burns CLINTON P Her body V Her bodv comment from burned when her clothing caught Nebr wV fire as she was placing paper in farded one of labors the kitchen stove Phyllis Jcarmo congressional c n the kitchen stove Phyllis Jeanne Howe 7 died Wednesday in Mercy hospitalThe child ter of Mr and Mrs W C Rowc Tuesday night gathered scrap paper in her apron after making paper dolls and was placing thc pieces in thc stove when flames leaped forth ignited her clothing and in an instant enveloped her 5ody Thc mother who had turned her back just before the accident wrapped the child in a blanket to extinguish the blaze and then rushed the child to the hospital LABOR DISPUTE Results Expected to Have Far Reaching Effects on Defense By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS A dramatic test of strength in the captive coal mine labor dispuU Wednesday approached decision and the result seemed sure to hav farreaching effects on the entiri defense labor situation The stage wasset in swift move I uesday High CIO officials one after another resigned from the na tional defense mediation board protest to that bodys 9to2 recommendation against he union shop in the captive coal pits operated by the bir steel companies The army in a preeaulionan actmn looking toward a possibk emergency established an intelli gence center in Pittsburgh where the coal from captive mines fuels steel mills essential to the govern ments defense plans In congress some members were Passing hard for strikedeterring legislation and others were said h be reluctant to ease neutrality ac reslnc ons unless steps were taken to avoid defense work stoc pages at home p Philip Murray CIO presiden and vice president of the United and Thomas LTMW secretarytreasurer resigned forthwith from the media tion board and wrote Presiden Roosevelt that the boards recom union naq made it to relairiany con fidences its fufureiaction Mur ray announced that four CIO al ternate members of the board had resigned that a fifth planned fo and that the attitude of a sixtl was unknown to him The United Mine Workers he Pits for three days last month demand ing I he union shop under thc erms of which all employes would be required to become union members after a specified Period of probation The strike affectms 53000 men was ended by a truce until Nov 15 to per mit the mediation board to form ulate its recommendations John L rewis the unon deepvoiced stocly president has made no public statement on the boards recommendation But he has called a special session of the UMW policy committee at Wash ington Friday evidently for a de cision on the matter As UMW president Lewis is also the learior of 330000 employes of cornmer cia coal mines Just how the withdrawal of the CIO members would affect the mediation board was uncertain It lisputes pending involving workers One possible in dication came Tucday night when J Thomas president ot the CIO United Automobile Workers di rected union representatives to postpone presentation of any cases before the board because H had no CIO representation The captive mine situation brought comment from Senator ho is re warmest Zinc Curtailment May Cost Jobs of 700 DE3MOINES George X1 lson Wednesday informed the 0PM that a 31 per cent curtail ment in zinc allotments may cost nearly 700 employes of General 3ry Batteries Inc of Dubuque theur jobs DIES OF BURNS EDDYVILLB WFuneral ser ear o aushter of Mr and Mrs Gebrgc Villiams of near here who died Wonday night of bums Authori ics said her clothing caught fire vnile she was playing with matches congressional colleagues He cant eo on as we are eo fnjr noiv he told newsmen In anv arsiiment over a closed shop neither side has the riBht to de lar the defense program But when labor has not had a closed shop before then it should not take advantage of the national defense effort to obtain one and inns block that effort Referring specifically to the new strike threat Norris said he bc icycd the president had the power to take over the captive mines and thus end the dispute If he does not have that authority then we should pass legislation giving it to him A strike which had vexed navy officials and interfered with work on in naval and marine construction around San Dieao L was settled Monday night and icials of AFL building trades unions said the 2164 strikers would be back at work at noon Wednes lowan Sees 5th Son Leave for Armed Forces CEDAR RAPIDS IP John Novak saw his fifth son leave Tuesday to join the nations armed forces when Joe Novak 24 board ed a bus which took him to Fort DCS Momcs for induction into the army The youth are in the navy jr T four brothers hey are Jerry 19 Otto 8 and John By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Adolf Hitlers Crimean aimies were reported to have readied the Black sea coast Wednesday just below Kerch gateway to theCau casus oil fields while on traf front the Russians declared they had battled the Germans to astandstUl with more than 70 000 ijazig killed and wounded in the 41 day old drive on Moscow Soviet dispatches admitted however that German troops had advanced to the vicinity of Nurofominsk 35 miles south west of Moscow but said the sit uation had been stabilized The Germans said their advanced forces were within 31 miles of Moscow at one point Narofominsk lies on the Kaluga Moscow highway about 30 miles cast of Maloyaroslavets the scene of heavy recent fighting A bulletin from Hitlers field headquarters said German and Ru n flags on the eastern shore of 1ea sharP ing and nazi frontline dis patches reported that Kerch ilself was jammed with fleeing red arm v troops If true the arrival of axis forces along the Kerch strait would mean h age had bcen reached m the battle of the Crimea Less than four miles wide the strait presumably would offer only a minor obstacle to nazi veterans of the conquest of Crete across 75 miles of open water Beyond the strait on the Caucasian mainland are situated the great wells pra iu ol Russias oil supply The Germans said thetr dive bombers were Inflicting havoc both at Kerch and Sevastopol destroying port facilities and 108Ses ln men Y if The German threat to Sevasto Fi vis also apparently increasing the Russians acknowledging they had withdrawn from the rail town irai jip miles north k sea navaj In the central front S A Lo sowct spokesman declprea the position of the red Before Moscow was con siderably better and that Hitlers a nrjhc Russians said Hitler threw 19 about 285000 troops well as 1000 tanks and 900 Planes into the drive starting Oct B onBOct Hit by terrific losses thc Ger mans were now reported brintine up masses of tush reserves to meet fierce soviet counleratacks Nazi military d i s p a t c h el acknowledged that a fantastic tern of underground tank garages buried flamethrowers ana huge mine fields around Mos cows 200mile defense arc made the going slow and hazardous thc in their vanguards had ad vanced mlhin 50 kilometers 31 miles of the capital Toll From Londons Mad Submachine Gun Wielder Rises to 3 LONDON death toll of Londons mad tommygun wield 4f i thrcc when M y w Mrs Emily Crisp 55 died in hospital of her wounds She died as Philip Joseph Ward a gunner in the royal artillery vas arraigned on a formal charae of murder in the killing of Leslie Francis Ludford 28 a solicitor t person to die in the mad fo Four other persons were wound ed by ihc man who fired a sufama chmegun apparently at random vhiJc roaring through qiuet West London streets in an automobile Weather Report FORECAST W a i r Wednesday and Wednesday night Thursday partly cloudy rising tempera ture Wednesday cooler west portion Thursday Winds south west 2025 miles per hour Wednesday cloudy Wednesday through Thursday warmer Wednesday and in northwest portion Wednesday night cooler Thursday wind southwesterly 20 to 30 miles per hour Wednesday IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics Maximum Tuesday 36 Minimum Tuesday night 29 At 8 a m Wednesday 36 YEAR AGO Maximum 35 Minimum 2 Precipitation 40 FREE PRISONER Trap Is Sprung at Gallows at Fort Madison at 7 07 am FORT MADISON Kissing crucifix just before the black hood placed over his head Ivan Leori Sullivan 30 dropped through the gallows trap to his hele WcJnesday for the 1340 slaying of an Iowa state penitentiary guard The trap was sprung at m and Sullivan was officially pronounced dead by Warden Glenn C Hayncs at thirteen minutes later the 7 and calm the man who killed Guard Rouert Hart in an abortive prison delivery here a year and a half agoshowed no emotion except to close his eyes as if m prayer as guards strapped legs and arms before placing black cotton hood over his head The Rev H V Bongers Fort Madison priest who spent all Tuesday night in death row with the condemned man stood on the ground beside Sullivans dangline body and intoned Scriptures while three doctors examined thc slayei for 13 minutes before indicating the last spark of life had left the murderer bank robber and kid naper Approximately 170 persons in udmg 12 ofticial witnesses newspapermen and a large num ber of peace officers saw Lee county Sheriff Harry V D Maas push the lever that sent Sullivan hurtling to death crowd stood silent as Sullivan marched mte the small stockade in the southeast corner of the penitentiary grounds arid climbed the 17 steps lo the plat form of the temporary gallows erected last week Sullivan was dressed in a neat blue suit with a pin stripe fur nished by the state He wore a white shirt and a striped tie His shoes were blackoxfords and he nad a black overcoat draped on his shoulders against the sharp chill wind which made spectators glad to huddle close together in their roped portion thc stock ade No women witnessed the hang ing Women witnessed the last sev eral executions Guards said the killer who Tuesday night had newly attacked Warden Haynes and Gov George A Wilson in a death watch state ment spent a quiet night and even slept briefly Early Wednesday he drank some coffee bat afe nothing Father Boneers said mass out side the death row cell Wednes day morning and gave holy communion Sullivan then shed his blue striped prison clothes and donned the provided civilian garb On the steps the cell house bulhvan and his guards paused briefly while pictures were taken Then completely surrounded by guards he began thc 300yard walk to the gallows Father Bongers in full vest ments fed the procession with Sheriff Maas at his side Next came Sullivan with Deputy War den John Bennett at his right In the rear walked Prison Chaplain John Rees who had joined thc condemned man an hour earlier Spotlighting Sullivans con version to Catholicism since he had been an occupant of death row was a tiny lapel pin show ins a white cross on ailue field It was his only adornment Just before the hood was placed over his head Sullivan kissed the IVAN LEON SULLIVAN on Gallowt   

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