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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: October 24, 1941 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - October 24, 1941, Mason City, Iowa                                NORTH IOWAS DAILYPAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME OF HISTOHV ANO ARCHIVES KOINES M HOME EDITION ASSOCIATED PRESS AND UNITED PHESS FULL THE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKtS ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS MASON CITY IOWA FRIDAY OCTOBER 24 1941 MASON CITY THE BRIGHT b SPOT Red Mill School Razed by Flames Everything Saved Even George Washington Reports One of Pupils as She Watches Smouldering Ruins ant saved and the teacher Miss Rose Heim buch and the five pupils were un harmed JVePkmg director staled the board of education would meet Saturday night lo make plans for a temporary home The teacher discovered the Maze at a m Friday while classes were going on Tiny names were dancing about the stovepipe where it entered the chimney she stated Heimbuch called Mr Wep King who lives nearby and sev eral men were pressed into ser vice in lighting the blaze At first water from the school pump was used and the blaze inside the on room bunding was extinguished However it spread rapidly through the walls and into the inaccessible attic and wnhm an hour the structure was a mass of the roof ard walls caved The heat became so intense that it was soon impossible to use the school pump The men fighting the blaze taking advantafc of buckets cans and other available containers formed a bucket briz ann tIe Winncbago river about iuo yards away and carried enough water to save the coal led near the school building and keep the flames from sprcad Their eyes redTvith tears a country school teacher and herfive puplls stand before the smoJderfng runs of the building where barely an hour before they had been busv studying spelling and geography But we saved eveiv tmngieven the picture of George Washington nvomllv School located on the old Scenic highway mitenorth LINCOLN NO 8 SCHOOL BURNS Bucket Brigade Formed to River but Efforts Fail to Save Building The Red Mill School Lincoln No 8 burned to the ground Fri day morning as the resultof a faulty chimney despite efforts o hastily recruited farmers Who lormed abucket brigade to carry water from nearby Winnebago weaf of the beet sugar plant Left to right are Marliri John son Margaret Ann Wepking Miss Rose Heimbuch the teacher Margaret Opkis Patricia Harris andSh Opkis The connection where the furnace stovepipe joined the chimney origin of the fire can be clearly seen Just be tween Margaret Opkis and Patricia Harris is visible the MLff PmP so close to the burning T Mt be Used by men the fire Loch photo Kayenay engraving i Tank Output for U S to Be DoubledF R WASHINGTON ing aj figures President Roosevel announced Friday that the Amer icanprogram for producing tanks for United States armed forces would be approximately doublei at once The chief executive Ibid a press conference that the pro ti ted expansion was part of an overall revision of the defense Picture But Ihe rest of it he saW will not be ready until later in the fall or perhaps when con cress meets for a new session in January Mr Roosevelt would not the present tank program called for nor what the increase would provide That he asserted was information which the axis would like to have It does call for many thousand more tanks he asserted along with certain items of ordnance re lating to them The principal reason for the decision to make a tremendous increase in Unk output the president disclosed grew from the experiencein the use of tanks in North Africa last year Some new plants probably will aiVe be buiu to turn out the niarged volume of tanks Mr Roosevelt declared while factories ow making Ihem will have lo tep up their production Reminded that William S Knud en director of the office of pro uclion management had men a goal of 2000 medium anks monthly Mr Roosevelt said ne new program went beyond iU LAGUARDIAIS INDORSED BY FR President Backs G 0 P and Labor Nominee for Mayor of New York WASHINGTON Roosevelt indorsed the candidacy of Mayor Fiorello La Guardia republican and American labor nominee for a third term as mayor of New York Friday de claring that La Guardias admin istration had been the most hones and most efficient within his recollection The president skimmed through at his press conference a forma statement which he had prepared on La Guardias race for reelec tion and laughed with reporter when he said he was not takin part in theNew York City elec tion but felt that he was entitled 10 speak about it because the city contains about half Ihe popula tion of his state He noted too that although his voting residence always had bfen upstate he had lived and worked f 3 9Srdias democratic oppon nt s William ODnryer Brooklyn district attorney Naval Science mcnt has aptly been described as representative of the highest in tion Skilled men to whom the navy gives training are required tma1lho vastly fleet which is now offering cx eptional opportunities Young men may obtain a free booklet Life m the Navy by writing the navy editor GlobeGazeUc Ma on City Glass Eye Shot WATKINS Minn Nistler 73 had only one eye Fri day but was thanklul He and his daughter Mrs K were reluming from a pheasant hunting trip Thursday when they spoiled a flock of birds olf the highway Mrs Wartman left the car and followed the flee ing birds She soon was hid from view by a turn in the road Nistler drove slowiy down the road As he abend his daughterfired at a pheasant Part of the buckshot shattered Nistiers left Corwith Man Hit by Car Hurt Fatally CORWITH Henry Johnson 1 died at Veterans hospital in Des Moines early Friday of in juries suffered when he was struck by the car driven by John of Corwith near this town Thursday night Johnson was walking alongside railroad tracks going with his orother Jack lo their home when jhe car struck him at a crossing He was treated by a local physi ian then taken to the DCS Moines hospital He was a Spanish American war veteran With Evans was Jack Pabb The orwith men were returning home from Kanawha where they had pent the evening 2 Arrested for Riding Bicycles While Drunk DES MOINES said riday they had arrested two 17 and the other bieyclcs while HIS PAPER CONSISTS OF TWO SECTIONS SECTION ONE NO 13 TUMBLES 5 MILES AND PULLS CHUTE CLAIM GERMAN LOSS TERRIFIC NEAR MOSCOW Germans Assert 260 Red Divisions Destroyed So Far in Campaign By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Russia declared officially Friday that several hundred thousand Germans already have been killed in the 23 day old drive on Moscow and that in four months the nazis have lost as many men as the total casualties suffered by Kaiser Wil hclms imperial armies in four years the World war According to U S slate depart ment figures the Germans lost 1 773700 killed and 4216058 wound ed in the J9HI8 a total of 5939758 DNB the official German news agency quickly followed this claim with the reported de struction of more than 260 soviet 3900 000 to 4680000 the bloody campaign up to Sept 1 The soviet newspaper Pravda reported that a new German thrust south of Leningrad had been thrown bade with at least 2500 killed wounded or captured and that red army troops had retaken the villages of Velya and Kholmy Russian frontline dispatches said the Germans had also been and south of Moscow but acknowl edged a new German penetration in the Donets river battle zone in he Ukraine The Germans have not taken and will not lake Moscow said S A Lozovsky official soviet spokesman Nevertheless Premier Joseph Stalin delegated two of his key marshals to form new red armies and soviet dispatches acknowl edged that Moscows position was Knox Thinks Collision in Far East Inevitable Thinks Japs Determined to Expand THE ASSOCIATED PKESS quoted grave The British radio Pravda as saying Today Moscow ts in danper We shall never surrender We must be prepared to see the streets of Moscow become the scene of violent fishtinf Lozovsky aserted the Germans were still more than 60 miles from the U S S R capital countering official German claims Thursday that nazi spearheads had advanced to within 35 miles of the city Serving notice that Russia would never quit Lozovsky told foreign newsmen that Marshal Semeon Budyenny and Marshal Klementi Voroshilov withdrawn from the battlcfront had already begun organizing new armies from the vast reservoir of soviet man power Hitler promised to end the war before Winter then throw enormous forces against Eng land He has failed in both Lozovsky said We folly realize the eravity of the situation but the so viet government and people will fight to the end Premier Stalin and the soviet detense council lie said are re maining at their posts in Moscow tions manufacturers We are satisfied in our ow minds that the Japanese have n intention of giving up their plan for expansion If they pursue tha course a collision there is incvit able By contrast the Japanese cabi net spokesman Koh Isliii de dared that the long smoulderin crisis in realtions between the twi countries had been modified by ai indicated American decision t ship war aid lo fiussia via th Arclic port of Archangel instea of through the sea of Japan ti Vladivostok Ishii told foreign newsmen thai Japan had explained every point of her stand in recent talks with Washington and now awaited the reaction of Presi dent Roosevelt and Secretary of Stale Cordcll Hull Asked whether Japan wa hopeful of settling her difference with the United States Ishii said Youd better ask Mr Hull Ishii indicated however tha Japanese editorials were corrcc m saying that Japan would no back down on her new order fo East vast and somewha vague program envisioning a co prosperity sphere which som analysts have compared will Adolf Hitlers ulooc drenched new order in Europe Great Britain in close consu laiion with the United Slates ha repeatedly warned Japan to keei hands off Thailand the Dutcl East Indies and oilier rich source of supply in the Orient Only a few days ago moreover the In dies government offered faeilitie for basing United States warship there in Japan the event of war the fight for Russias dispatches said fierce directing life JMIIH jierce handtohand fighting was racine m the streets of three cities around the beleaguered Kaluga 90 miles southwest Moz haisk 57 miles west and Kalinin 9a miles northwest red army bulletin reported especially stubborn fighting in Mozhaisk and Maloyaroslavets di rections The latter is 65 miles southwest of Moscow The Russians acknowledged Ihey had fallen back under the assault of German mortar and automatic rifle squads at some points in the Mozhaisk battle zone but declared that red army motorcyclists in the same area had recaptured two villages and thrown the nazis back across a river On the southern Ukraine front soviet reports said the Ger mans had renewed violent at tempts to smash into the Crimea peninsula site of Ihe Black sea naval base of Sevastopol but as serted that the invaders had been repulsed with more than 2 000 nazis killed or wounded The Russians said red troops defending the important city r RostovonDon gateway to the Caucasus were engaging avis troops under Field Marshal Ewald Knoxs electric pronounce ment came less than 48 hours alter the Japan Times and Ad vertiser controlled by the Tokio foreign office offered the anti axis powers a last chance to use Japans senices as a me diator in the European war The newspaper warned how ever that Japan was ready to fight the United States to protec her interests in the Orient and other Japanese newspapers bit terly assailed the United States chargingthat this country was at tempting to gain bases in soviet Siberia for use against Japan Actress Collapses Working on Movie HOLLYWOOD dress Gene Ticrnoy was reported suffer ing from nervous exhaustion and a severe cold Friday She collapsed on a movie set She was taken home and work on the production was hailed Dr Robert Rathbonc said she had been overworking von Kliest in a violent battle near Taganrog 30 miles west of Ros tov and that the Germans had been repelled at all points except one Thursday Soviet forces withdrew to a new clcicnsc line after inflicting heavy losses on the nazis and llieir Ital ian Hungarian and Rumanian al lies Moscow dispatches said Delayed dispatches from Kui byshev disclosed that all three nf the key marshals named by Premier Joseph Stalin to head northern central and southern defense zones against the shocks of the German summer offensive had been shifted with luo of hem assigned o organ ize new Russian armies The organization tasks fell lo bemustached Semeon Budyenny whose southern forces had been driven back the farthest of all of Russias defenders and Klementi Voroshilov whoje northern com mand duties included the corre lation of civilian and military ef forts in Leningrads long fight against German siege units Marshal Semeon Timoshenko a former defense commissar wiioie displacement by Gen Gregory K ihukov in command of Ihe cen tral front lines was announced earlier this week has taken over the southern strategy Who re placed Voroshilov was not dis closed Report Petain to Leave France If Reprisals Go On VICHY rumor swop Vichy Friday pight without of ficial confirmation lhat Marsha Henri Philippe Petain will cros the French demarkation line an surrender himself as a hostage l the Germans if they execute anj niore French citizens as hostage in reprisal for anlinazi acts Vichy officials insisted the had no knowledge ot any sud plans by the marshal Fifty more Frenchmen died be fore German firing squads Fridaj in reprisal for the slaying ot nazi major at Bordeaux Th Germans hold another 100 whom they plan to execute next week i Ihe perpetrators of the Bordeau and Nantes assassinations are no apprehended before their dead line The rumor of Petains intention appeared indicative ot the ten sion created by the terrorist ac tionand the German of reprisal Minisler of InteriorPierre Pu chcu who returned Wednesdaj from Paris where he offered apologies of the Vichy regime fo t h e Nantes assassination let Vichy at 7 p m Friday night to go back to Paris RUSSIAN TIME BOMB KILLS 50 Rumanian General Dies in Odessa Explosive Was Left by Reds BUCHAREST Rumania Fifty axis officers and men in cluding the Rumanian General Glogojcanu have been killed by the explosion of a time bomb in captured Odessa Rumanian mili laiy dispatches saidFriday Other dispatches identified the general as the Rumanian com mandant of Odessa German naval officers were listed as victims Ihe others were believed to be Rumanians The dispatches said that the bomb had been planted near a for mer secret police headquarters by the Russians before the port citv was captured Weather Report FORECAST MASON cloudiness Friday night and Sat urday becoming generally warmer OWA Considerable cloudiness Friday nighl md Saturday be coming gradually warmer MINNESOTA Partly cloudy Fri day msht and Saturday warmer cxlrcmc south cooler northeast and northcentral poriions Fri day night IN MASON CITY llobeGazettc Vcather slalistics Maximum Thursday 56 Minimum Thursday nighl 33 At 8 a m Friday 41 YEAR AGO Maximum 66 Minimum 42 EXTENDED FORECAST Extended forccasl for the period rom p m Friday Oct 24 Upper Mississippi valley Tcm eralures will average above nor lal with near normal Salurday varmer Sunday and Monday and ooler Minnesota Wisconsin and owa by Monday night or Tuesday reeling temperatures unlikely in ndiano and Illinois Precipitation noderalc cxccpl light in northern linncsota occurring first half of enod n moderate area and oward end of period in northern mncsota NEW MARK SET UPFORDELAYED OPENING JUMP American Makes Leap From Stratosphere Over Airfield in Illinois RUB1NKAM AIRPORT HAR VEY 111 human projectile laden with 85 pounds of scientific instruments and parachutes rock eted down from nearly six miles out in the stratosphere Friday to a new world record for a delayed opening parachute jump Arthur H Starnes jumping In obtain data for military and sci entific authorities was the man who made the leap He left his plane at 30400 feet and tumbled to 1580 feet of the ground before rippine open his two Parachutes V He landed uninjured a mile south of Ihe airport It wasnt bad he said My goggles froze over on the way down and I couldnt see my alti meter I had to lift one side ot my goggles and take a oneeyed squint at the ground to guess how high I was and when I should pull the rip cords I was in a terrific body It was 25 below zero up there where f jumped but aside from getting my hands cold I felt fine It look two hours for Ihe plane to spiral to the strato sphere but Starnes boots scraped the ground about 4 minutes and 15 seconds after he plumed from the plane The National Aeronautical as sociation does not log official rec ords for parachute jumps but has an informal record of 26 575 feel as the previous top height It was set by a Russian army parachutist nVid llis chutc unlil O feet from the ground in 1034 A 35 year old parachutist who has been making delayed jumps for two years under the observa tion ot scientific and military au thorities was the human bomb Pilots of the airplane which took him aloft made a run for the tar get with special sights and at their Signal Starnes tumbled out into a rarer atmosphere than man has ever before experienced outside an airplane or balloon Special oxygen apparatus de signed to burst from internal pressure in the stratosphere en abled Starnes to live through the first few seconds of his earthward plunge The height at which he left the plane was almost twice that at which man must have auxiliary oxygen supply or lapse into uncon sciousness Starnes looked like a man from Mair equipped for a twoweek camping trip He wore doublelens joggjes to prevent fogging a ace mask and oxygen tank with special bailout bottle to use during the first lerrific plunge hrough rarified air an electrical y heated jumping suit an electro cardiograph to record his heart action a shortwave radio trans mitter with microphones pressed igninst his Adams apple lo shut out the roar of air a 16 m m movie camera and two Ucclrodcs strapped to his chest recorded his heart action on serrci ive apparatus on the ground He vas able to follow his downward progress on the dial of an alti meter strapped to his wrisl A stop valch limed his descent and a barograph registered the height at vhich the jump began Pilots Clarence Clark and Will D Parker both of Tulsa Okla iiloted the plane from which itarnes leaped It was loaned for he experiment by Ihe Phillips etroleum company The jumper weighs 190 pounds ut with all equipment he scaled 75 This weight plummeted him o the ground at 120 lo 135 miles n hour His wife Charlie and son Rob rt 14 came from their home at Calumet City 111 to watch the xperimcnt Starnes prepared for Fridays M rncmaUinB umps of 12500 18500 and 25009 The military implications in hls daj Menaltitude homb mr and fighter plane duels are IT AvUlion ant to know what will happen   

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