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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: October 22, 1941 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - October 22, 1941, Mason City, Iowa                             i f1 NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME OCMRTIIENT OF HISTORY AND ots HOME EDITION THC NEWSPAPER THAT MAKtS AU NORTH IOWANS NIIGHIOW MASON CITY IOWA WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 22 7 MASON CITY THE BRIGHT SPOT 22 1941 ras PAPER CONSISTS OF TWO H SECTION ONE SECTIOKS NO 11 HULL NAZIS SPREAD SEA TERROR Drive on Moscow Bogged Down REDS DECLARE NAZIS LOSSES ARE ENORMOUS London Sources Hear Hitler Massing Forces to Attack Capital Anew By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Soviet dispatches pictured Adolf Hitlers invasion armies as suf fering enormous losses on the Mos cow front Wednesday with liter ally every meter of ground covered with the bodies of fascist soldiers and officers as the Germans drove toward the Russian capita from the Mozhaisk sector only 57 miles away Military reports reaching Lon don said the 21dayold German offensive bad bogged down in an icy gale over all but impass able roads on the Immediate ap proaches lo Itloscoir A highranking neutral military authority in London said reliable information from Russia indicated that the German assault on Mos cow and in the north was definite ly halted and tbatthe peak of the nazi offensive had been passed Undoubtedly Hitler will order and carry out new attacks the source said but he will not again be able to muster anything like the strength he has used up in the past two weeks Other London advices how ever said the Germans were concentrating great new forces Premier Joseph Stalin remained in the Kremlin to direct the red citadels defense with the fiercest action centering around Mozhaisk Tass the official soviet news agency said the Germans hurled tanks motorized infantry and aviation into the assault which developed into handtohand fight ing The news agency said Marshal Semeon Timoshenkos red troops fell back to new lines only where the Germans were able to concen trate numerical superiority The depth of the withdrawal was not disclosed Winters first snow fell over the Mozhaisk region and a bitter wind howled over the steppes pilingsnow on roads and in forests Hitlers field headquarters silent on any new advance in the opera tions before Moscow declared that axis troops driving into the Donets river industrial basin in the Ukraine had scored further ad vances By contrast reports reaching London said red army troops had stopped the German thrust toward Rostov gateway to the Caucasian oii fields after evacuating Tan ganrog 30 miles to the west A Russian broadcast said the Germans had lost more than 5 000 men under tankled red army attacks southwest of presumably in the Maloyaroslavets sector where nazi spearheads have been reported within 50 miles of the Kremlin Soviet reports also told of renewed German attempts to advance east from Orel with heavy fighting raging along the OrclMtensk highway Mtensk is miles southeast of Mos cow In the north the Russians said red troops defending Moscow were inflicting severe losses on the Ger man siege forces killing 500 in one engagement and 400 in another Soviet correspondents reported that Russian resistance was stif fening steadily northwest of Mos cow in the Kalinin sector and that violent red army counterat tacks had smashed back a German attempt to cross a river there Hitlers high command gave no details of the asserted new ad vance into the Donets river basin In the Bryansk sector 200 miles south of Moscow the nari high command said mopping up opera tions had led to the capture of 5000 more prisoners and 56 guns rf As the Russian campaign en tered its fifth month a red army bulletin broadcast by the Mos cow radio said allnight fighting rayed in the sectors of Mozhaisk Maloyaroslavets 65 miles south west of Moscow and Kalinin 95 miles northwest of the the same areas mentioned for 1 the past two days Advices reaching London said reads on the Moscow front were becoming almost impassable Mark Thornburg Announces Candidacy for U S Senate Major Political Fight in 1942 Republican Primary Is Expected DES G Thorn burg Iowa secretary of agricul ture Wednesday announced his candidacy for United States sen ate in the 1942 primary The announcement assured the Iowa republican party of a major political conflict next spring Gov George A Wilson is considered a certain candidate for the same nomination although he has not yet made a formal statement of candidacy Thornbnrf is the first re publican to announce his 1942 senatorial candidacy Besides Governor Wilson the other po tential candidates include James Dolliver of Fort Dodge former Congressman Lloyd Thurstun of Osceola and G Scott Davies of Des flfoines The primary winner will com pete next fait for the senatorial seat now held by Clyde L Her ng a democrat Herring is al most certain to seek reelection Thornburg former Palo Alto county agent at Emmetshurg and six times elected state secretary of agriculture said in his formal statement Agriculture is Iowas greatest industry and at the present time is enjoying a fair degree of pros perity due to the emergency When Hitler has been defeat ed and the defense efforts of the nation have been completed the farmers problems will again be a major national issue and at thai time congress will need men ex perienced mi spent I was born and rearea on an Iowa farnv I Jat tended the rural schools and was graduated from Iowa State col lege at Ames I have been a farmer land owner and a member of Iowa State college faculty and have been elected secretary of agri culture six different times with leading majorities My train ing experience and education should be of help in adjusting the postwar agricultural con ditions Agriculture has been benefited through farm organizations and the AAA Tremendous progress has been made Parity has been accepted and recognized I have favored these measures and while they are not perfect they are subject to improvement A splendid start hasbeen made With the unity and counsel of Iowa farmers and farm organiza tions which I will seek we can continue this forward movement lor agriculture Industry and labor too play n important part in Iowa The manufacturing income in the state is reported to be greater than the agricultural income Sixtyfive per cent of the manufacturing in come is from the processing of agricultural products these manu facturing industries not only use Iowa capital and pay Iowa taxes but they also employ Iowa labor These industries should be en couraged and as secretary of ag riculture it has been my oppor tunity to work with them and I feel I know their problems Agriculture Industry and labor all working together with equal recognition of each others rights will make for economic stability Today foreign affairs over shadow all other matters I am against Hitlerism isolationism and negativism I served in the last World war and have been a member of the Legion for many years heir program for preparedness and their foreign policies have al ways had by support But there must come from the world crisis an enduring peace and the right of men women and children to be to gov ern free to worship as they hoose with freedom of speech reedom of the press and an equal opportunity for an abundant life The bringing of peace and the rights of free men to the world depends much on our defense ef orts and and to the invadad na lons These defense efforts have een characterized by confusion approaching chaos I regret the amount of political byplay and veste when the very life ot this nation is being threatened The president should call and sur round himself with this countrys ablest men and give them power o act We know that carrying on our defense work and aid to the in nations is expensive but here should be injected into the ederal activities the excellent business methods of economy that MAKK THOKNBUKG candidacy the Iowa republican legislature and the state officials have so successfully carried out in this state since 1938 The department of agriculture has had an important part in this program As far back as 1824 un der my administration the de partment of agriculture was put on a selfsupporting basis no costing the taxpayer one cent for its operation In fact monies col lected for fees licenses etc each year have exceeded the appropri ations to the department and af filiating agricultural associations and the balances have been turnec over to the state treasurer We are proud of this accomplishment has been that of a liberal progressive republican who will counsel with the peonle with the aid of thatcourisel I know weicairmakeithe republican Offices Deferred WASHINGTON tion of a state office building at Des Moines wiir have to be deferred until after the emergency because of defense priorities on materials State Sen ator Ray Emerson ol Creston Iowa said Wednesday There is no question about it he sam after conferring with of lice of production management of ficials to get their reaction as to whether the state should proceed with the project Emerson member of a special committee in charge of construc tion of the building and Hodney Q Selby secretary of the industrial and defense comm sion gained most of the informa Maury Maverick in the OPM s state and local government civilian supply division Maverick suggested Emerson said that we go ahead and com plete our plans for the building so that it can be a backlog to take care unemployment and surplus materials when this thing is over th it was his opinion that the priorities situation would be about the same as it is now when the plans are completed in about five or six said he that it h a would be a good idea to complete the plans adding have a five or six months start and can be ready to take bids when wc get the light to go ahead green Ottumwa Delegation Presses for Location f Military Airport WASHINGTON Encour aged by what they said was ten tative civil aeronautics authority approval of a site near Ottumwa Iowa for location of a military airport members of a delegation from that city took time off to visit Iowa congressmen and Vice Presi dent Wallace The delegation headed by Ot Mayor David Nevin was told by CAA officials that a nine square mile tract five miles north of the city would be considered for possible location of the airport f the present construction pro gram is extended the mayor re ported Between conferences with fed eral officials the delegation visited Vice President Wallace Senators Gillette and Herring and Repre sentative Lecompte REFUGEE TALKS ATCIRCULATION CHIEFS SESSION Newspaper Workers Discuss Means for Improving Business Northern States circulation managers were taken down a roat jammed with refugees fleeing Oerman occupied Paris anc through the entire experience o the nazi hordes overrunning France when Miss Lilette Holbert refugee from Paris spoke at a Wednesday noon luncheon of th managers association Miss Hoibert told of her ev Periences in her flight from 1 aris and of how the city looked after the nazis had occupied it She described the manner in the Germans acted and of her own reactions to their in vestiture of the French capital Also outlined was the story of her trip to the United States Wednesday mornings program was devoted to discussions of various aspects of newspaper cir culation work Successful Fail ures was tlie topic of a discus sion by Glenn Ortniayer of the Charles City Press Harold Web ster of the Red Wing Minn Re and William Hibbing Minn publicanEagle Kemp of the Tribune Discussing Promoting Sub Ecnptions by Mail were S W Phelps of the Aberdeen S Dak AmericaNews E J Leichty o the Iowa City and GeorgfeKotinek of Minn Daily News talked 6n Se curing New and Renewal Sub scriptions by Direct Mail and B Thomson of the Grand Forks NDak Herald spoke on Se curing New and Renewal Sub scriptions Without Use So licitors The problem of what the small newspapers can do to comply with the wages and hours and social security laws both in the circulation depart ment and with newspaper bojs was developed in a paper writ ten by Stanley Morris and L E Dyer both of the Pacific North west Circulation managers as sociation The annual banquet of the as sociation was presented Tuesday evening in the English room of Green Mill with Floyd L the Hockenhull of Chicago publisher of Circulation Management maga zine as the featured speaker th tr told the group that the Northern States associa tion is doing an outstanding job of circulation work Circulation today is of greater importance to newspaper pub lishers than ever before fie as serted going on to point out that in the newspaper field as a whole the revenue from advertising has fallen off while that from circu lation has gained In a two year period he said advertising in come dropped 32 million dollars out circulation revenue gained 19 million often proving to be the difference between continuing and going out of business Circulation revenue showed gains even during the depression Mr Hockenhull said Recalling the days when the circulation department was re garded by other newspaper work ers as a poor relation the speaker asserted that publishers are now realizing the value a good cir culalion manager can have for them In those days the editorial department got credit for circu lation on the theory that they put put such a good paper the public was hound to buy it he continued but name me a big paper in point of circulation that doesnt have a hard work ing strong circulation depart ment There are four distinct parts to the circulation managers job ac cording to Mr Hockenhull He listed them as 2 being a sales man 2 being the delivery su perintendent 3 being an office manager and 4 being an execu tive department head The circulation manager roust know the editorial advertising and mechanical departments as well as his own the group was old The one man in the organ zation who knows best what the public likes to read in his paper s the circulation manager be cause he gets the starts and stops and most of the squawks Mr Hockenhull went on io say that this closeness to the public May Execute 50 More French men British Bombers Raid Naples mHeavy Waves for 5 Hours Italians Admit 14 Killed English Blast pulse would make the circulation department an excellent spot lor training for men intending tr go into the editorial end ot the newspaper business You are a man who must sit and analyze editorial merit must know what your flesh and blood readers like he said Also on the evening program was W Ear Hall GlobeGazette managing editor who gave a short talk on his South American trip last spring He outlined Soutl ways and conditions the American with special emphasis on newspaper business there Blr Hall also dwell on the axis influences in Latin America sayine that the many hundreds of thousands of Ital not potential they U rSotrtli jAweriea to rfct from fascfait The Germans on the other hand have never surrendered their allegiance to the fatherland and would be a threat to the in dependence of the various coun tries if Hitler wins the war in Europe For the present however they have only Mr Hall said nuisance value In closing his talk the editor ex pressed the opinion that Hitlerism is a threat to the entire world and asserted that this country must be prepared to go to any extreme to defeat the nazis If Hitler wins the war the United States will face a long period of tremendous fense construction that de amount almost to everlasting war the speaker said A group of entertainers fur nished by Jimmy Fleming and Ernie Gerard presented a pro gram of music and dancing Jo wind up the evening Acting as master of ceremonies for the en tertainment was H B Hank1 Hook w s W Hllstrom of the GlobeGa zette president of the circulation managers association Music was played during the dinner hour b singing with Mr Hall and Hook leading community WITHHOLD JUDGMENT CHICAGO Robert t Wood national chairman of the America first committee varninz against national indignation aroused by incidents which may have been provoked by our own action Tuesday urged the American people to withhold judgment on the Kearny torpe doing Weather Report FORECAST MASON CITY Showers and thunder storms Wednesday night ending Thursday slightly warmer Wednesday night be coming fair and cooler ate Ihursday and Thursday night IOWA Showers and thunder storms Wednesday night end ing Thursday becoming fair and cooler Thursday afternoon and night MINNESOTA Mostly cloudy showers Wednesday night and in extreme east portion Thurs day morning becoming fair and cooler Thursday cooler west portion late Wednesday night IN MASON crnr GlobeGazette weather statistics Maximum Tuesday 61 Minimum Tuesday night 50 At 8 a m Wednesday 53 03 inch YEAR AGO Maximum fjj Minimum 45 Nazi Port of Bremen bombers wave an HOME attacking Naples in a hour for five hours caused huge damage Tuesday night in the wars heaviest assault on Italys big west coast maritime and in dustrial center the high com mand declared Wednesday Bombs dropped by the hun dreds were said to have killed 14 and injured 27 It was the second raid on the city in less than a week British planes having carried out an at tack last Thursday night which the Italians said killed 1Z per sons and injured 37 West coast has a of is a maritime anaindustrjalcenter British air raiders also were re ported to have attacked oft bombed Catania Sicily again last night One of the attackers was shot down in flames the high command said The raid was the heaviest Nap les has suffered since Italy en tered the war June 10 1940 LONDON bombers blasted the big German port of Bremen Tuesday night and struck at a number of other objectives in northwest Germany the air min istry announced Wednesday Other attacks a communique said were directed against docks at the French ports of Brest and Lorient the harbor and fuel stores at Aarhus in northern Denmark and Ger man airdromes in northern France and the Netherlands Loss of three planes in these as saults wasacknowledged by the British but they raised to 13 the number of German fighters re ported destroyed by the RAF in sweeps over northern France Tuesday Ten British fighters were lost in those daylight raids the air ministry said but declared four of the pilots had been 1escucd The Germans acknowledged the RAF had attacked several places in northwestern Germany but minimized the damage and said that two of the raiders were destroyed At the same time nazi night raiders dropped bombs along the British cast coast and at a num ber of points in the northeast The government said some houses were destroyed and reported a small number of casualties One of 2 Men Seized With Arsenal Wanted or Theft of Auto DES MOINES WOne of two nen seized at Indianola with a arge quantity of guns and am munition is wanted in Missouri on a charge of transporting a stolen automobile across a state line I L Dalton federal bureau of in vestigation chief here said Tues day The pairs abandoned car con amed numerous guns burglary tools nitroglycerine and other articles Warren county Sheriff Lewis Johnson said The officer aid one man drew a gun as he topped to question them near he scene of an accident he was nvesUgaling and that he arrested hem Dalton said the man wanted in Missouri was Merle William Mar in of Webb City Mo The other man being held is Harry Hudson Sorg also of Webb City Johnson aid 2ND NAZI CHIEF REPORTED SLAIN Germans Kill 50 in Nantes Reprisal 50 More Held in Bordeaux VICHY Unoccupied France CP Phillipe Petain chief of staff announced to the French nation Wednesday that 50 of their countrymen had been siiot by German occupation authorities Wednesday morning in retaliation for the assassination of German officers His broadcast followed news that the second German officer assassinated in 48 hours met death Tuesday in Bordeaux Admiral Jean Darlan vice pre mier followed his chief on the radio in a series of emotional ap pealsvt Nthefpopulace by Frances highest authorities the marshal and the ad miral accused foreign powers of having caused the recent series of assassinations There were no details of how the first 50 hostages were shot at Nantes Another 50 are scheduled to die if the two men who shot Lieut Col Paul Friederich Holtz chief of the nazi field gendarmerie at Nantes are not captured by Midnight Thursday In measured tones Petain a nounced to the French Against officers ot the army of occupation shots have been fired Two arc dead Fifty Frenchmen Wednesday morning have paid with their lives for these unname able crimes Fifty others will be shot Thursday if the culprits are not found The second officer was reported to have been shot dead by two youths on the Boulevard St Georges in occupied Bordeaux at p m Tuesday night The Germans immediately ar rested 50 hostages in Bordeaux indicating a determination to con tinue the policy of stern reprisal Witnesses of the killings said tour youths shot the officer and tied They described the assail ants as resembling workmen and Jut their ages as between 17 and Sullivan to Be Executed on Nov 12 DES MOINES iVilson Wednesday declined to commute the death sentence of van Leon Sullivan 30 and set Nov 12 for his execution Sullivan was sentenced lo be 1940 of Robert Hart a guarff aunng an attempted delivery at Me Fort Madison state peniten iary from which the condemned layer and two companions had escaped a short time before The governors action Wednes day followed an application for clemency at a formal hearing last Only further action left to lUllivan now would be a possible ippeal to the United States su preme court Sullivan will be hanged at i m Nov 12 five minutes after iunup The governors warrant for the execution said in part Whereas I have read with care he transcript of testimony and irguments ot counsel and the ases cited and after due consider ation that I am of the opinion hat executive clemency should not be granted The Sullivan case is the second n which the governor has denied lemcncy the first being that of Valter Rhodes of Iowa City who vas hanged for the slaying of his vi fe ALL ON BOARD AMERICAN SHIP LEHIGH SAVED Sinking of Freighter Bold Venture From Torpedo Also Revealed WASHINGTON of State Hull Thursday labeled the torpedoing of the American freighter Lehigh off Africa as an act in harmony with all the def initions of piracy and assassina tion This sinking ot a vessel fly Ing the American fW and traveling without cargo between Bilbao Spain and the African gold coast was a perfect exam pie Mull told his press confer ence of the nazi policy of at tempting to create a reign of terror frightfulness and abso lute lawlessness on the high seas and especially on the At Hull spoke shortly after the mdntime commission said it had been advised of the rescue ot ail the 39 Americans of the Lehigh Twentytwo men were landed at Bammst by the British ship Vimy and 22 at Freetown Sine the crew included only 39 offi Nazis Skeptics BERLIN quarters said Wednesday re ports ot the sinkings of the American flat ship Lehigh and the American owned Bold Ven ture tonW only te rewrfed in Germany the jkep llclsm All recent alterations of United states statesmen regard ing ship sinkings have proved to hive been fakes and Inven tions an authorized spokesman said cials expressed the belief thai the others were stowaways The news Savc a measure of re lief to tins capital perturbed hough it still was over the o fot loAthnr Amrira 10 Atlantic raiders The sea wars toll of Ameri can vessels now stands at 10 the stnklns a Particularly flagrant act of piracy None of the Lehigh wvivois The condition of Joseph Brady Jr third assistant engineer was 3S rather senW He P chest and leg injuries iiic other injured crew member was Joseph Bartlclt an oTdmarv seaman who lost three toes but The latest ships to be Iot the Lehigh which went dovn flyinir the American flat Sunday off the west of the Bold Venture American but operating 11 n d e r Panamanian reghtrv wjieh was sent to the to off Iceland last Thursday berlyand he dwelt poin edly oa the circumstances of the sinking There was no doubt he regarded additional argumef t for The Lehigh he said had dis cargo at Spain and was proceeding southward empty without triditlsr Hie gold coast She was sunk Just north of the equator be tween South America and Af rica he said but nearer to the Of the rf He took the trouble however o stress a second time that the American merchantman carried nocrP and informed source ferr at fact was porlanl for it eliminated question of contraband anv as an at I   

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