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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: October 16, 1941 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - October 16, 1941, Mason City, Iowa                             NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME OCPARTVENT OP HISTORY AMD ARCHIVES CCS MOIIUS AA HOME EDITION VOL XLVIII ASSOCIATED PRESS AND UNITED PRESS rUli LEASED WIRES THi NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS MASON CITY THI IR1GHT MASON CITY IOWA THURSDAY OCTOBER 16 1941 THIS PAPER CONSISTS OF TWO SECTIONS SECTION ONE NO 6 JAP CABINET QUITS Report Nazi Vanguard 50 Miles From Moscow Wont Shoulder Break With U S RUSSIA ADMITS Diplomats on toKaza Moscow 4 WKJ ARMY FALLING BACK ON WEST Red Radio Declares German Forces Are Numerically Superior BULLETIN NEW YORK radio reported Thursday lhat soviet forces are falling back on the western front protecting the Russian capital under the attack of nazi tanks and mechanized infantry In a broadcast heard by the United Press listening post the Russian radio said that danger is hovering over Moscow The government newspaper Izvestia reported that the Ger mans had hurnd a great force of mechanized and armored troops against the western front and broken through soviet de fenses at one sector The Moscow radio admitted that nazi forces are numerically superior to the red army but said hat soviet soldiers arc fighting until the last drop of blood By UNITED PRESS Diplomatic missions it appeared Thursday have left or are pre paring to leave Moscow lor a safer location to the east at the instruc tion of the soviet government The safer location was be lieved to be Kazan on the Volga 450 miles east of the soviet capital Stockholm reported that the Swedish legation other diplomats and at least part of the soviet gov ernment are believed to have left Moscow Tokio heard that the Japanese embassy in Moscow had been in structed to be prepared to leave Moscow by midnight Wednesday night A large part of the diplomatic staffs of the Moscow embassies and legations were evacuated to Kazan at the start of the war It was understood that some soviet government offices also were re moved to the east and many non combatants including women arid children have been removed from Moscow Washington had no confirma tion of the departure of the American embassy staff but it was pointed out there that the move H k 1 I probably was related to the ap By JOE ALEX MORRIS proach of the battle front to Mos Unitet Press Foreign News cow rather than to any dccisiou to Editor withdraw east of Moscow German armed forces pounded Radio between toward Moscow Thursday with re Moscovy arid United States unded round were Thurs the Japanese heard Vat trie regujlrlyiichedaied hour rWv ChargesBridegroom Said He was Only 80 But Was Really 86 0 K Came From Jacksons Spelling rr closer a farjieaswiu ouunuunu The nazi vanguard probably was 50 milesfrom the soviet capital Thursday Reports indi cated it had pounded forward another 10 miles in 24 hours of bloody fighting London said Premier Josef Stalin may be forced to decide at any moment whether to stand and fight on the defenses of Moscow or to withdraw to the east to better CHICAGO divorce erid dffenstve positions cd a yearold NovemberDecember Full implications of the fall of romance Thursday Crowning in the Japanese cabinet were not suit said Mrs Sophie Barthlott immediately apparent beyond the 73 was that her husband Herman certainty that the dayof Japans told her he was only 80 when he showdown in her relations with was really 86 the axis the United States Brit ain and Russia has been brought closer The Germans are known to have been putting pressure on Japan to quit dickering with th United States and Britain and f V 1 V strike a blow for her axis partOI VJU KOrTeCK ners There seemed no doubt that the nazis were employing their CHICAGO An military success around Moscow drew Jackson was a poor speller a potent argument forJapanese His version of all correct was action oil korreck In approving oifi The Moscow situation as recial documents he shortened it to ported by the Russians was ino k hence that familiar expres creasingly grave Russian forces sion in our language Authority were falling back slowly but conI3th section of a new dictionary stantly under nazi pressure and a off the University of Chicago German breakthrough of apparpress ent importance had occurred somewhere along tlie western fronti Moscow said the military situation had changed for the worse and that the nazis con tinue to pour new reserves into the fight The Russians it appeared have warned all foreign embassies in Moscow to be prepared to evacu ate to safer points in the east Tokio reported that the Japanese embassy was told to be ready to leave the capital by midnight Wednesday Nazi propagandists seized on these reports to hint that Moscow already had been encircled by German rapid troops and panzer spear heads so that discussion of evacuation plans is now useless The German spokesman said that the nazi high command presently would make a bomb shell announcement which would make this clear Actually there was nothing in military reports from either the Russian or German side to indi cate that Moscow has been en circled However there was no doubt that the Germans are pressing close to the city and it seemed possible thatisolated ar mored units of the panzer forces may have slipped through at vari ous points possibly including po sitions east of Moscow The German high command said that Kalinin 100 miles north west of Moscow and Kaluga 100 miles south of the capital have been in German hands for sev eral days Petain Orders Trials for French ExLeaders VICHY Unoccupied France Petain Thursday or dered a speedy public trial for fivi men accused of leading France tu defeat against Germany including former Premiers Leon Blum anc Edouard Daladicr and the one time allied generalissimo Maurice Gustave Gamelin Weather Report FORECAST IOWA Increasing cloudiness an warmer Thursday followed b rain Friday beginning in soul and central portions Thursda night cooler Friday M1NITESOTA Increasing cloudi ness Thursday night and Eri south Friday warmerThursdb night cooler Friday IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics Maximum Wednesday 63 Minimum Wednesday night 30 At 8 a m Thursday 48 Frost was observed as the mer cury Wednesday night dipped to 30 lowest point this fall YEAR AGO Maximum Minimum 55 34 6 Killed in TrailerTruck Wreck Near Owatonna Pictured above are scenes of the devastating wreckage resulting when a huge truck sideswiped a trailertruck near Owatonna Minn about 6 oclock Thursday morning killing six orchestra players asleep in the trailertruck at the time of the accident The pictures were taken by E B Freeman and Leonard Carlson of St Paul aviators who chanced to be driving from StPaultoSioux City and were among the first at the scene In the top picture is shownthe demolished trailer in which members of the Red Sievcrs band were sleeping The six bodies had just been removed from the vehicle wreckage The lower photo shows the truck which sideswiped the orchestra truck trailer A dead cow one of two killed is lying in front of the truckEighteen other cattle in the truck were running about the scene of the mishap freed by the impact of the collision The front of the truck was demolished GRAIN PRICES ZIP DOWNWARD Loses 10 Cents a Bushel Maximum Permitted in Session CHICAGO prices tumbled JO cents a bushel on the board of trade Thursday the limit permitted in one session All other grains showed sharp losses with selling in all pits attributed day ram east and extreme to war news and fall of the Jap anese cabinel Rye tumbled 10 cents corn and soybeans 8 cents and oats 6 cents the maximum decline permitted in one session in each instance u LEFT HANDEK WINS MONROE iP Lefthanded Woodrow Dietrick of Monroe won the Jasper county cornhusking contest with a record of 2654 pounds He was Jasper county and district champion in 1S39 Mason City Made Induction Center on Page 21 Dance Band Musicians Are Victims of Accident in Fog Sievers Leader of Orchestra Is Among Those Dead in Crash OWATONNA Minn members o a Minneapolis dance orchestra were killed Thursday when their truck was sideswiped by a cattle truck Joe Ostberg Minneapolis an other member of the band was taken to an Albert Lea hospital with cuts and bruises Three others were injured slightly and were not hospital ize ci The dead Edmund G Sievers 32 Min neapolis leader of the orches tra Gordon Dnnham20 Min neapolis Melvin Gilberg Min neapolis Vern S Mollerstrom 21 Hunting Minn Donald M Simmons 20 Minneapolis and Roger Johnson 18 Minneapolis The driver of the cattle truck Ernest Mehlhoff 26 Breckenridge Minn was uninjured and was held by sheriffs deputies for questioning Deputies said another man also uninjured was with him Two head ot cattle were killed 1 The accident happened 11 miles south of here on highway No 65 Ostberg who was reported in good condition said I cant re member much about it Id rather not talk about it When I left there the victims were stretched out on the ground It was horrible The band was returning from Marshalltown Iowa Mchlhoff said a fog pocket on the road obscured the other ma chine until it was too late to avoid the crash After being questioned about the accident Mehlhoff was re leased Authorities said no inquest would be held Mehlhoff said that because of the fog and lights of the ap proachinr bns lie did not real ize he was on the wronj side of the road until the crash oc curred The three uninjured members of the orchestra were Don Hul berg James Lcverett and Clif ford Johnson all of Minneapolis The band purchased the combi nation bus and truck from another orchestra and was using it for the first time HOUSE DEBATES ARMING OF SHIPS Rayburn Predicts Law to Be Passed With 100 or 150 Majority BULLETIN WASHINGTON er Sam Kayburn predicted Thursday that the administra tions merchant ship arming resolution Mould pass the house Friday by a majority of 100 to 150 votes WASH1GTON iP Wellin formed house sources reporte Thursday increasing signs tha republicans were slowly abandon ing their opposition to Preside Roosevelts foreign policies an would vote in surprising numbci to permit the arming of Unite States merchant ships These sources predicted tha the final rollcall probably Fridaj on a resolution to repeal the neu traJity act prohibition against put ting guns on cargo vessels woul show more republicans volin aye1 than on any recent foreign policy legislation This shift in sentiment was re ported as the house met an hou earlier than usual to start dcbat on the simple repealer Army Navy Chiefs and F R Confer WASHINGTON ff President Roosevelt Thursday cancelled a scheduled cabinet session and in stead called a meeting with his ranking state department and military and naval advisers pre umably on the new crisis in ipan caused by the resignation the Konoye cabinet Participating in the 2 p m con were Secretary of State ordell Hull Secretary ot War enry L Stimson Secretary of avy Frank Knox Gen George Marshall army chief of staff dmiral Harold II Stark chief of aval operations and LendLcase L Hopkins Hull had a separate conference ith tlie president at noon News of the Konoye cabinets jsignation stirred the state de artment and white house to re oubled activity Officials here regarded the isignation as a victory for apans proaxis element in their trugglc against Konoycs policy f attempting to improve relations ith the United States Discussions between the two owers were opened two months go at Premier Konoyes direct re uest to President Roosevelt The apancse premier it was said taked the future ot his cabinel n the outcome ot the talks anc is resignation could be taken to lean they were unsuccessful There were some fears in ad ministration circles that the cab net change might lead to a more trmgent attitude toward the ship ment of American supplies to lussia by way of Vladivostok Many of these shipments havi gone in American flag ships vhich now are unarmed The Kjmoye cabinet which ha consignments as untrieridly t Japan but took no Concrete step to interfere with them WILLlOCATE IOWA FAMILIES 10000 Acres Bought in North Iowa for Those in Defense Areas Iowa Defense Re ocation corporation has agreed li buy more than 10000 acres of lam in which to relocate farm fami tes displaced from defense areas George Heikens vice president o hc corporation and state rura ehabilitation supervisor for th farm security administration an nounced here Thursday Checks will be written to cover the pur chases which consist of three laree tracts in Kossuth Pali Alto and Wrieht counties Funds for the relocation put chases have been loaned to the corporation by the farm security administration through p G Beck regional director in the five corn belt slates Thirty families are now living on the accepted land The large tracts will be broken up into enough familysize units rang ing from BD to 100 acres to handle 96 aditional families Each family size unit will have its own set of buildings The corporation will make whatever improvements are necessary to put the farms into operating condition Tenants now living in the area will be given first chance to rent the reduced units on which their buildings are now located Heik ens said The land accepted for pur chase includes 4690 acres owned by the Metropolitan Life In surance company in Kossuth county 45X8 acres owned by the Bankers Life Insurance company in Kossuth and Palo Alto counties and 800 acres owned by the Hartshorn estate in Wright county When the project is completed farmers who have been displaced by the Burlington ordnance plant at Burlington and by other de fense industries in rural areas will be eligible to move on to the re location farms It is estimated that 310 families have been displaced by the Bur lington ordancc plant Since there has been a serious shortage of familysize farms in Iowa we are trying to make room for displaced families by purchas ing and subdividing a few large tracts Heikens explained CRISIS ARISING ROM RUSSIAN WAR IS FACTOR Nippon Navy Officer Says Relations With U S at Crossroads TOKIO The Japanese overnment resigned Thursday light admitting its inability to igree on the great issues conlronl ng tlie empire Failure to reach an accord with he United States and growing military pressure for action in the crisis arising from German suc esses against Russia were strong y indicated as major factors in he ministrys fall Premier Prince Fumimaro Konoyc presented en bloc the resignation of the cabinet Jiis third to Emperor Hirohito amid increasing press agitation for an end to efforts to conciliate file United States Konoyc had let it be known he would not take responsibility for a break with America The resignation followed sever al days of intensive consultations among the empires highest over some of which the emperor him self presided Until Thursday night there had been no official intimation that a cabinet crisis was imminent Although Wednes day it was pointed out that the prominent part taken in the con ferences by the Lord Privy Seal Marquis Koichi Kido indicated big changes Domei news agency dose to the government said formation of the new government whether under vlhe fall reached the public when newsboys ran through blackout darkened streets crying gcgaU gogai extra extra Japans capital is going through intensive air raid precautions maneuvers The resignation came shortly after a foreign office announce ment that the staff of the Jap anese embassy in Moscow and other Japanese had left the Germanthreatened Russian capital for an undisclosed des tination It was said that similar with drawals had been urged by the Russians upon all other embassies and legations there so Japans action was not the result of iso lated circumstances The background tiie resigna tion also included a Japanese naval officers declaration that JapaneseUnited States relations were at crossroads where they might turn to war The officer Capt Hideo Hiraide director of naval intelligence speaking Wednesday night at Kyoto envisaged the possibility of a soa campaign against Japanese trade and of bomber raids upon the Japanese homeland Me said a crisis of increashir gravity faced Japan through steady tightening of ABCD American British Chinese Dutch encirclement of her islands The newspaper Asahi took a similar view declaring differences between tile United States and Japan were producing a crisis which if not arrested would lead inevitably ti a clash In case of a war Hiraide said guerrilla operations would be undertaken for the de struction of trade plus air raids against national territory by some naval force He said some bombers might strike from ABCD bases near Ja pan but declared that the great DOUGLAS IS 43 WASHINGTON u s I i c e William O Douglas youngeit member of the supreme court be came 43 years old Wednesday PREMIER PRINCE KOXOTE cabinet falls   

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