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Mason City Globe Gazette: Monday, October 6, 1941 - Page 1

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - October 6, 1941, Mason City, Iowa                             NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME COMP DEPARTMENT OF HIST OR V AND ARCHIVCS DCS HO I KES A f HOME EDITION THE NEWSIAKR THAT MAKES ALL NORTH 10WXNS NEIGHBORS MASON CITY THE IRIGHT SPOT VOL XLV1I ASSOCIATED PRESS AND UNITED PRESS FULL WIRES tlVE CENTS A COPY MASON CITY IOWA MONDAY OCTOBER 6 1941 THIS PAPEH CONSISTS Op TWO SECTIONS SECTION ONE NO 310 YANKEES WIN CHAMPIONSHIP 3 T01 FINAL CONTEST LOST BITTERLY BY BROOKLYN Capacity Crowd Sees Game New Yorkers Take 4 Out of 5 Games EBBETS FIELD BROOK New York Yan kees won the 1941 world series Monday by beating the Brooklyn Dodgers 3 to 1 for their fourth victory in five games Paid attendance was announced as 34072 the biggest turnout of the three games in Brooklyn contributing total receipts for the day of FIRST INNING Yankees Sturm opened with a single to left center Holfe ground ed to Reese who threw to Coscar art forcing Sturm but the relay to Camilli was slow and wide pre venting a double play Henrich who had struck out Sunday for what would have been the final out of the ball same except that Owen failed to the ball waited out a base on balls in his first trip at bat and Owen missed he fourth ball which rolled into the Yan kee dugout almost duplicating the dramatic situation Sunday DiMaggio fanned and Owen threw to Riggs to catch Rolle sliding into third for a double play No runs one hit no errors one left Dodgers Walker flied to Keller Riggs tipped the ball foul and it fell to the pain while LOOK INSIDE FOR French Claim British Sank Three Ships VICHY French navy ministry reported Monday night that three French merchantmen had been sunk by the British and said that one the 8194ton freighter Theophile Gautier was part an Italian convoy when she went down off the cast coast of Greece It was the previous loss of two other ships the tanker Cap itaine Baliani et Alberta and the 1370 ton merchantman Oued Yquem which caused the ministry to accept an Italian naval escort for the Theophile Gautier it said Report 2 Way Offensive Against Reds LOUIS D DRANDEIS Former Supreme Court Justice 84 Succumbs PAGE 2 struck Dickey who ground in obvious Iowa Taxpayers to Meet at Des Moines STATE PAGE scoring after the catch Camilli struck out One run two hits no errors one left FOURTH INNING Yankees Dickey knocked the Manager McCarthy and the Yan kee players crowded around him apparently had been hit in the groin After laying on the ground a few minutes Dickey was helped to his feet by his team mates tightened up his chest pro tector donned his mask and play was resumed Riggs shot a hot grounder to Gordon and was thrown out Reis er tripled against the wall in front of the eenterfield bleachers Ca milli raised a high fly to Rizzuto No runs one hit no errors one left SECOND INNING Yankees Keller drew a walk the ball getting away from Owen and rolling several yards back of the plate but he retrieved it in plenty of time to keep Keller from taking an extra base Dickey sin gled sharply along the ground intj right center and Keller slid safe ly into third Wyatt made a wild pitch far over Owens outstretched glove and Keller easily scored while Dickey went to second Gor don drove a single off Coscararts glove and Dickey scored as the ball continued into deep right Hizzuto bounced the first pitch to Rifigs who tossed to Coscarart forcing Gordon Bonham struck out Sturm bunted toward third base and was thrown out by Riggs to Camilli Two runs two hits no errors one left Dodgers Medwick fouled off first pitch back at Wyatt the bail hitting him on the shins but he picked it up and threw to Camilli for the out He apparently was not hurt After getting the count 1n three and two Gordon walked and Wyatt came running in from the mound In a heated argument with Umpire McGowan Wyatt threw his glove on the ground and and yelled Durocher joined In the dispute and ges turedwithhis arms while stand ing chin to chin with the umpire After several minutes of de bate Durocher returned to the dugout As Wyatt walked back to the mound he threw the ball high in the air and let it He on the dirf Then he started dig ging a hole in the mound by kicking his cleated right foot Finally he picked up the ball and started to pitch He threw three straight balls to Rizzuto before the umpire called a strike Then Rizzuto walked on the next pitch When Bonham after taking one strike tried to bunt and checked himself as the ball went wide McGowan first appeared to signal a ball and then waved a strike This brought Manager McCarthy running from the Yankee dugout and also Coach Art Fletcher from STONE PRESIDES OVER COURT New Session Opens With 8 of 9 Justices Named by Roosevelt WASHINGTON new chief justice Harlan Fiske Stone presided over the supreme com Monday when it opened its 1941 42 term at noon It was the first time since 1930 that a new session of the cour has not been called to order by Charles Evans Hughes who re signed as chief Justice last June The court also lias iwo new as spciate F Byrne and Robert H Jackson Th justices face one of th heaviest dockets in recent years Nearly 700 individual cases mus be disposed of and from 400 t 500 more are expected to come r before adjournment next June Action on over 300 of those nov pending will be announced Hex Monday of the nine justices on the bench this year were nomin ated by President Roosevelt Stone first was nominated as an asso ciate justice by President Coolidge in 1925 but was nominated to suc ceed Hughes by President Roose velt Associate Justice Owen J Rob erts is the only justice not receiv ing an appointment under the present administration The new and taken their oaths Byrnes succeeds retired Justice James C McReynolds and Jackson takes Stones place as associate justice ALLISON MAN IS HURT AS WINDS HIINORTHIOWA Buildings Blown Down and Livestock Killed as Result of Storm North Iowa residents were giv en some idea near midnight Sat urday evening pt what a hurri cane would be like But it was by comparison only The wind which blew down outbuildings and trees vas measured at its height by the official weather son City at 32 miles an hour at p m But it was only a gentle breeze compared with the 102 mile an hour hurricane which swept across the Bahamas and then blew itself out before reaching the Florida coast One man was seriously in jured as a result of the storm He was Hubert Rassler Allison who Is about 45 and was badly burned when he came into con tact with a live wire while working on REA wires torn down in the storm five miles northwest of Allison Sunday morning Air Rassler was taken to a Charles City hospital and his condition was reported as serious Monday He suffered head and lee burns A wind and rainstorm of tor nado intensity struck Garner and vicinity late Saturday night dis rupting power and telephone ser vice and blowing limbs from trees and damaging small buildings badly angled and many ears were blown from the stalk One and jnefourth inches of rain aceom Not a Single Pone Broken panied the storm The storm razed the third base make a brief coaching box to protest Bonham three pitches and finally walked Reese flied high to DiMaggio Owen received another tremend ous ovation from the crowd as he came to bat With the count three balls and one strike on Owen Bonham gave him what looked like a high pitch and Owen tossed aside his bat and ran haltway to first base before the umpire waved him back and informed him it was a strike Manager Dur odier protested briefly but Owen returned to the box and raised a high fly to Keller Coscarart bounced to Bonham who threw to Sturm for the out No runs no hits no errors one left THIRD INNING Yankees Rplfe walked Wyatl walked in behind the plate to pro test to Umpire McGowan on the called ball and was joined by Dur ocher but the pitcher returned to the mound and Durocher to the dugout Henrich flied deep to Reiser and Rolfc held first Di Maggio fanned Keller grounded to Coscarart and was thrown out iSoruns no hits no errors one left Dodgers Wyatt lined a double into the left field corner Walker lined to DiMaggio Wyatt holding second Riggs belted a liner that that struck Bonham on the right leg below ihe knee and caromed off toward the third base line for a single Wyatt reaching third Reiser drove a high fly which Henrich took a few feet from the scarcboard in right field Wyatt fanned on the next pitch Sturm grounded out to Camilli unassist ed No runs no bits no errors two left Dodgers Fletcher came up to the plate again to talk to the um pire and then retired to the dug out Medwick lined to DiMaggio in left center Reese smashed a liner which Keller caught on the run in lett center Owen lifted a high foul to RoUe No runs no hits no errors none left FIFTH INNING Yankees Rolfe knocked a roll er to Camilli back first and he threw to Wyatt for the putout Henrich picked out the first pitch and shot a homerun over the right field fence 40 feet high and 300 feet from the plate pulling Camilli off the bag for an error Gordon smashed a hot grounder to Reese who started a double play Reese to Coscarart to Camilli Rizzuto lined a single to left Bonham struck out No runs one hit one error one left Dodgers Reiser almost knocked Gordon down with a smashing grounder but the Yanks great second sacker threw him out Ca milli raised a high lly to Keller Medwick slapped the first pitch back to Rizzuto and was thrown out No runs no hits no errors none left drove a high fly to Reiser in deep center DiMaggio made a bier turn for second base on the fir and as he headed back to the dugout he exchanged heated words with Wyatt who on his previous time at bat had thrown a high inside pitch which made DiMaggio drop al most to the dirf The two start ed for each other and almost every member of the two teams and the umpires raced to keep them apart Keller struck out One run one hit no errors none left Dodgers The crowdtooed the Yankees as they took the field Coscarart raised a high fly to Di Maggio in left center and the The high southwest wind which hit Mason City just before midnight Saturday took advantage of an open door and wont right on into a garage standing on the corner of Polk avenue and Ninth street northwest Unfortunately there was no door at the other end The result can be seen in the picture above with Albert Stoeckcr 1004 Elm drive owner of the garage inspecting the damage Freak of the storm was the fact that not a single pane of glass was broken in either side of the building despite one being tossed on the roof of a neighboring garage The insert shows Mr Stoeckcr beside one of the windows Lock photo Kayenay engraving a barn two crowd booed caught it and hooted as he The jeers turned to cheers as Wyatt came to bat Wyatt flied to DiMaggio Walker was passed on four pitches Riggs raised a high foul which Rolfe came in to take in front of the Yankee dugout No runs no hits no errors one left SIXTH INNING Yankees Dickey grounded to Reese who made a bad throw N Y Brklyn SCORE BY INNINGS 134 5S789 D E H 0 til B E R SEVENTH INNING Yankees Sturm lopped a weak grounder to Coscarart who threw to Camilli tor the putout Uith the count three and two on Rolle the attention of the fansand players suddenly was attracted to left field where a piece of bunting draped over the railing in the upper deck of ihe stands caught fire and fell blazing to the ground Fortun ately it missed falling on the people in the boxes below Rolfe then fouled off a pitch and raised a short fly which Reese took near the left field fou line just back of third Henrich fanned No runs no hits no errors none left Dodgers Reese raised a pop fly to Sturm Owen grounded out to Rizzuto Galan batted for Coscar art Galan popped foul to Sturm just a step away from first base No runs no hits no errors none left EIGHTH INNING Yankees Herman now playing second base for the Dodgers Di Maggio singled past Wyatts head the ball going into center field Keller hit into a double play Her man to Reese to Camilli Dickey rolled out Herman to Camilli No runs one hit no errors none left Dodgers Wyatt grounded out Gordon to Sturm Walker singled to right Riggs fouled to Sturm Reiser fanned swinging No runs one hit no errors one left NINTH INNING Yankees Gordon grounded out Riggs to Camilli Rizzuto fanned swinging Bonham fanned swing ing for the fourth straight time No runs no hits no errors none left Dodgers Camilli lined to Ri2 uto Medwick fouled to Rolfc Wasdeli batted for Reese Was dcll flied to DiMaggio No runs no hits no errors none left machine sheds and hen houses on he Chris Schroeder farm three niles north of Clear Lake Huge rees and a windmill on the farm vere also blown down Six by six imbers from the barn were lown half a mile away On the S Furness farm three miles northwest of Hanlontown the barn vas blown over The house was moved a few inches from its foun dation Trees were also blown down At the Strand farm two and onehalf miles east of Hanlon town outbuildings were dam aged and trees blown over A corn crib was blown over on the Elmer Bray farm two miles north of Hanlontown At the Dallas Clapper farm northwest of Clear Lake a corn crib was turned upside down and carried to an adjoining field An Jther crib was moved from its oundation Other farm buildings n the vicinity were damaged Many fences and trees were down At the Walrpd Gardens Clear Lake a beautiful mountain ash trees was snapped by the wind In the freak windstorm Sat urdny the large barn on the farm of Mrs J A Zimmerman and a halt miles northeast of Are dale was flattened Nearby build ings were not harmed An auto mobile standing 20 feet away was not even scratched A silo adjacent to the barn re mained standing although it leans slightly In the wreckage of the barn one cow and 16 pigs were killed The barn measuring 64 by 40 feet was built in 1931 Wires in Mason City Blown Down Storm damage in Mason City was extensive although limited tc trees being blown over and wires brought down although a plate glass window was blown in at the Salvation Army headquarters at 226 South Federal avenue Mercy hospital suffered a par j tiat blackout when wires lead ing into the hospital were bloun down at 12 midnight but the damage was quickly re paired without incident Police and firemen were kept busy throughout the city with calls to spots where trees hid been toppled or where live wires were sizzling in the trees or streets The firemen were called to Twentysixth street and Adams avenue southwest on the same call which the firemen answered a m a tree was blown down across the Twen ahdSpnth avenue I An officer moved the limbs enough to allow traffic to get through A wire was reported down and burning against a tree at Second street and Pennsylvania avenue northeast at a m and at a tree was reported blown down across the street at Fifth street and Washington avenue northwest Red lanterns were placed about it until morning Another tree was down on Fourth street northeast between Pennsylvania and Georgia ave nues blacking the sidewalkLan terns were placed there as well as around a tree across the sidewalk just west of the armory on Adams avenue northwest At a m a limb of a ree was reported down in the road at Twentyseventh street south west and lanterns were placed to mark the obstruction At a m the police went to Second street northeast at a spot be tween Pennsylvania and Georgia avenues and stood guard over a live wire until an electrician ar rived A gate was blown down from across the driveway of the Mason City Lumber company at 4 Fif teenth street northeast A tree was reported across the siucwalk al 1600 Washington avenue north west anci part of another fell upon n car belonging to the BirumOlson Motor company a 20 Fourth street northwest At a m the police went to Sixth street and Madison avenue southwest where a live wire hanging down near the sidewalk They stood guard until an elec trician arrivedThe same situation was discovered five minutes later at First street Adams avenue southwest and Twentysixth street and Adams avenue southwest at 1204 a m Sunday where a tree branch had blown into light wires to Second street and Pennsylvania avenue northeast at a m where wires were down and to 333 Twen tieth street southeast at a m where wires were blown into a tree The police answered IS calls in cluding the one to Mercy hospital at a m and the Salvation Army headquarters at the same lime At a m they went to Weather Report FORECAST IOWA Showers and thun derstorms warmer Mondaj night Tuesday partly cloudy t cloudy scattered showers warmer northeast somewha cooler extreme west MINNESOTA Occasional rain somewhat warmer cast and con tral Monday night Tucsda mostly cloudy scattered show crs warmer east IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics Maximum Sunday 59 Minimum Sunday night 45 At 8 a m Monday 55 YEAR AGO Maximum 77 Minimum 52 Precipitation 80 The figures for Sunday Maximum Saturday 65 Minimum Saturday night 54 At 8 a m Sunday 54 Precipitation 66 in YEAR AGO Maximum 75 Minimum 46 Lairo Hears Hitler Make Peace TWO lOWANS ARE CAIRO Adolf HHier win ake a new peace offer to Brit in and the United States as well efore the years end according to nformation reaching here Hitler according to one Ameri an recently arrived from Ger laiicontrolled territory expects o be able within this time to an ouncc that Russia has been put ut of the war and to slate that e is going ahead with his new rder on the continent and ig ore England except to carry out eprisals against her for any ombing done to Germany The Germans expect that Eng and after a period of such a stale iste would accept a peace this nformant said The peace otter forecast is giv n considerable credence in both ritish and American diplomatic uarters here but both are cer ain that the offer will be re ected and that the war will go on LABOR LEADER KILLS HIMSELF Grant Dunne Was One of 3 Fieriest Chiefs in Minneapolis Circles MINNEAPOLIS sui cide of Grant Dunne 48 Monday eft Minneapolis without one of its hree fiercest labor leaders and the federal government without one of its main defendants in an im pending seditious conspiracy tria of alleged Leon Trotsky sympath zers Dunne who joined with hi brothers Miles and Vincent ti compile one of the stormiest labo records in the citys history sho limself to death in the bedroom of his home Saturday night Hi wife told police he had been ill fo several months and had tried commit suicide twice before Grant Dunne along with hi brothers and 26 other defendants was indicted at St Paul Minn last July 15 on charges that thcj as members of the socialist work ers parly conspired to overthrow the U S government by force The socialist workers party is th branch of communism adhering t the teachings of the late Leo Trotsky The trial is schedule Oct 20 The Dunne brothers generally have been recognized as the strat egists behind the 1934 Minneap olis strikes in which six persons were killed and a hundred wounded Martial law was de clared in the city for six weeks and the Dunnes were thrown into military stockade Mr and Mrs Maurice Cox Letts Victims of Homicide and Suicide LETTS southeastern owa community was shocked Monday over lie sholgun deaths f Mr and Mrs Maurice Cox vhose bodies were found over the veckcnd BotU were natives of Letts Coroner George Jamison de cribed their tlealhs is homicide nd suicide Sheriff George Oakcs aid he believed ilie tragedy grew iut of an argument over The body of Mrs Cox 30 was ound in the Cox home here Sat urday night a purse containing still clutched between her cnees After hours of fruitless earching authorities early yester day found Coxs body in a corn ield near their home The Coxes seem to have strug led in the front room I think she was trying to keep the purse from lim Besides the it contained heir car keys the sheriff said Their 5 year old daughter San dra was still unaware Sunday of the tragedy Until recently Cox had been an assistant foresrum it the loiva oixl nance plant at Burlington but had obtained another job with the Natural Gas Pipe Line company of America Before going to the ord nance plant Cox had been a vacuum cleaner salesman here Double funeral services will be held here Tuesday LONDON HEARS MOSCOW GOAL IN NEW THRUST British Dispatches Appear to Bear Out Statement by Hitler By JOE ALEX MORRIS United Press Foreign News Editor Adolt Hitler was reported Mon day to be throwing almost the full power of his vast armies in Rus sia into a dangerous twoway of fensive which has Moscow as ils goal London reported that the at tack has been under way since last Wednesday and that it appears to be making some progress despite heaviest resistance by crack units of the Red array The British dispatches ap peared to bear out the state ment made by Hitler Friday that an operation of enormous scope had then been under way for 48 hours Berlin main tained almost complete silence on the drive but some hints have crept into the press that Moscow is the goal of the new offensive The new drive it appeared is following closely the pattern ol the offensive launched in mid August which the Russians re ported was broken up by a crush ing defeat of the elite panzer corps of Col Gen Heinz Guderian southwest of Bryansk London said that the Germans tpwardMos cow irompositions hills south of Laki IlnYen and from the Roslavl area These drives are pointed roughly south east and northeast from positions about 230 miles from Moscow Apparent relaxation of pressure on the Leningrad front may indi CARBIDE LOSS IS Explosion Occurs at Keokuk Warehouse Followed by Flames KEOKUK explosion followed by fire destroyed a ware house packed with thousands of tons of calcium carbide used in acetylene welding here at noon Monday A National Carbide corporation official who would not be quoted by name said the loss would run well over No one was injured The carbide was valued at more than Firemen were un able to throw any water on the blaze because of the inflammable nature oC the carbide TELEGRAPH EDITOR DIES FORT DODGE Edith Heath for a number of years telegraph editor of the Fort Dodge Messenger died here Monday morning following an illness of more than a year cate that the Germans unable to make decisive progress in their siege of that great city have switched powerful divisions to the southeast for the new Moscow offensive The German high command the first time admitted the strength of the Russian de fenders of Leninsrad reported that they had launched fierce attacks and had landed stronjc forces on the Gulf of Finland coast but insisted that nazl troops had repulsed both these attacks In the Ukraine fighting continued to be heavy particularly on the approaches to Crimea London re ported that soviet counterattacks of a flanking nature have been launched against the German for ces along the sea of Azov and Cri mea and indicated that weak spots may have developed in Ger man lines held by Rumanian and Hungarian troops One bise for Hie soviet coun terthrusts was said to be Meli topol Moscow reported Hut some 20 Ukraine villages had been recaptured in a 20 mile advance at an unnamed point and that Russian planes had wiped nut four German battalions about 4000 men as well as substan tial armored forces A Russian report on casualties in the war thus far placed Rus sian losses at 230000 killed 720 000 wounded and 178000 missing total ol 1128000 against esti mated German losses of 3000000 There was no diminution in un rest in nazioccupied Europe British reports said 13 more Czechs have been executed and Moscow reported 548 more Czechs arrested Antinazi posters were said to have appeared mysteri ously in Prague railroad stations Four more persons were reported executed in Holland and there were outbreaks in Jugoslavia The Sofia radio restricted its hours of operations to aid authorities in hunting an illegal communist sender From Prague came detailed re ports of the trial of Gen Alois Elias Czech premier who is un der a death sentence The reports indicated that a conspiracy of vast extent had been organized against 300 ARE REGISTERED DES MOINES 300 Persons were registered here Mon day for the 25th threeday con vention of the Iowa Chiroprac tors Association J the Germans in Czechoslovakia in which hundreds of prominent Czechs were banded in an espion age terrorist propaganda ring Many these Czechs it was in dicated were citizens who osten sibly were cooperating fully with the Germans United Press Staff Correspon dent Wallace Carroll investigat ing the religious situation in Russia attended services at the Yeslokiioco cathedral where he found 1000 persons most or them elderly Russians assem bled for the traditional rites of the Russian orthodox church   

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