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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: September 25, 1941 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - September 25, 1941, Mason City, Iowa                             DEPARTMtNT OF HISTORY ANO DES KOINES IA NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME HOME EDITION ASSOCIATED PRESS AND LEASED WmES THE NIWSPAKR THAT MAKB ALL NORTH IOWANS NHGHBORS MASON CITY IOWA THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 25 1941 MASON CITY THE BRIGHT TJUS PAPER CONSISTS OFFOUR SECTIONS SECTION ONE tOLXi iliiUDliHi cujvaiars FOUR SECTIONS XTri SKCT1ON ONE Starting Official Weather Observations at Mason City Airport The tisftt projects a ver T tical beam to the clouds in order to determine their height The elevation is com puted by means of a clinometer which is focused Oil the circle of light which is formed on the lower side of the clouds R A Fife is demonstrating us use in the picture Lock tif Temperature Service Is Available The thermometers wet and dry bulb and maximum and mini mum are housed in an enclosed shelter near the temporary quarters of the GAA communications station at the Mason Uty Air Activities airport on highway 18 Upon completion of the municipal airport administrations building CAA station will be housed there 0 F Nichols is recording temperatures Barometers me 913 This is theCAAcommunica tions station Say I want in go to the Twin Cities today Is the storm reach ins that far north k i Youll beable to do it just like that beginning Thursday Official weather reports will he available21hours a day to North Itnvans from the com munications station installed in temporary quarters at the Mason Ciy Air Activities airport on highway 18 by the civil aeronau ties administration For the four young men whose principal duties involve the com munication ol weather conditions and other information of value to airplane pilots also are certifi cated as official observers by the U S weather bureau Their hourly reports sent di lectlyon telegraphic printers in stalled at the station will dis tribute on a circuit from Chicago to Salt Lake City and from Min neapolis to Kansas City the fol lowing information 1 Height of clouds if under 10 000 feel 2 Sky conditions extent of clouds 3 to visible horizon 4 if any at the time or storms 5 Obstructions to smoke haze dust etc 6 Barometric pressure 7 Temperature and dew point 8 Wind direction and velocity 9 Altimeter setting correction atmospheric pressure 10 Miscellaneous remarks Like information will come mto the Mason City station from eaih of the other points on the telegraph circuit In addition lo this report the local station each six hours must inform the weather bureau of the type of cloud formations if anv the barometric change the amount of precipitation and the maximum and minimum temperatures This information is used in the prepara tion of weather maps by the bu reau The weather forecasts are based on the maps No weather forecasts will origin ate from Mason City however Only those prepared by the official weather bureaus will be available Manning the local communica tions station are four employes of the civil aeronautics administra tion W C Lyons in charge H E Casey R A Fife and O F Nich ols Mr Lyons came to Mason from the Rolla Mo CAA station Mr Casey lormeriy was with the war department at Washington DC Mr Fife was employed by the J I Case company at Rock Is land III and Mr Nichols owned electrical shop at Bethany Mo The first three are all natives of H E Casey is reading the mercurial barometer while at Ins left is the recording barograph which is corrected tour times daily by the check with the mercury column The barometers record atmospheric pressure and assist the forecasters in preparing weather maps from which the forecasts are developed NAZIS Communications The observations iecorded from the instruments arc sent out hourly to airports throughout the middle west on teletype writers auch as the one at which W C Lyons is seated In addition complete weather observations are reported every six hours to the U S weather bureaus which in turn prepare the weather ioiccasts MlLyons is in charge of the CAA communications station Corporation Profits 6 WASHINGTON of the Treasury Morgenthau an nounced Thursday that treasury experts had begun drafting a pro posed bill tolimit corporation profits to 6 per cent Following up his recommenda tion for such a limit before a congressional committee the sec retary told a press conference that he set his aides to work Thursday morning putting the idea into legal language for presenta tion to congress We have started drafting this proposal and will be ready when ever congress wants to gel to work on it he said Morgenthau indicated however that he preferred to present the idea as a tax bill before the house ways and means committee rather than as a rider to the pricecon trol legislation being considered by the house banking commit tee He expressed the idea for the first time in testifying on the price bill The drafting ask of his experts Morgenthau explained is to sur round the idea of a 6 per cent limit on corporation profits with other provisions to make the pro posed law as fair as possible to different kinds of business firms Weather Report FORECAST IOWA Fair to partly cloudy Thursday night and Friday cooler Thursday night scat tered frost north portion MINNESOTA Fair to partly cloudy Thursday night and Fri day cooler east local light to heavy frost Thursday night IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics Maximum Thursday 74 Minimum in night 43 At 8 a m Friday 43 Precipitation la YEAR AGO Maximum fio Minimum 33 Corning Iowa and grew up to gether Beginning Thursday they will offer flight reports free to any civilian pilot including weather and field conditions notification of Ukeoffsyand arrivals They also will give weather in formation at any time to any in quirer but made one request do not call between 20 minutes after each hour and 20 minutes to the hour Their duties aiie file each hour on the half hour and telephone calls are iikcly to be ignored during the period when observations and re ports are being made The telephone number is 913 City OF SERBS MKEILARASKS SENATE REPEAL ON NEUTRALITY Claims Act Now in Direct Conflict With Freedom of Seas Policy WASHINGTON e n a t o r McKeilar DTenn introduced in the senate Thursday a resolution to repeal the neutrality act which bars the arming of American mer chant ships and prevents them from entering combat zones Declaring that the was was in direct conflict with our freedom of the seas policy McKeilar told his colleagues that the law ought to be repealed outright The Ten nessee senator has been a con sistent supporter of the adminis trations foreign policy but there was no immediate indica tion as to whether he introduced the repealer with the knowledge of senate leaders President Roosevelt said Tues day that revision or repeal of the act was being studied indicating that action might be forthcoming next week McKeilar said he thoueht that while the law was on the statute books the government was paying virtually no attention to it and for that reason it ought tdbe repealed Senator Taft ex pressed belief that repeal of the act would be equivalent to a dec laration of war At the very least he said to reporters it would grant the administration authority to carry on an undeclared war Taft foresaw a knockdown anddragout battle in the senate against any repeal forecast which few legislators dis promised that he and other opponents of the adminis trations foreign policy would fight Vigorously However Representative Wads worth R W Y believed that the house was ready to repeal or modi fy the law and he voiced the hope that it would be wiped off the statute books In all our history he told newsmen we fought for the right to sail the seven seas at will In the neutrality act we surrendered that right That al ways seemed to me morally wronr Both administration and opposi tion polls have indicated that President Roosevelt could obtain the senates consent to modifica tion of act on this and other points House leaders also forecast approval there Mr Roosevelt in dicated Tuesday that he intended lo nsk congress next week to re peal the ban on arming ships but informed sources now believe that his message may go much further than that Pf evident Roosevelt Couple Is Greeted by Thousands Upon Arrival in Washington WASHINGTON UR The Duke and Ducehss of Windsor and his Americanhorn wile talked the president of the United States for nearly half an hour Thursday in the white house of fices Their visit with President Roosevelt highlighted a series of official and social calls that the Duke and Duchess made on their first trip together to Washinjrton They were creeled warmly both by officials and by throngs who shouted a friendly Hi Wally Hj Eddie as they sped about the city The President and Mrs Roose velt had planned a white house luncheon for the Duke and Duch ess but that was cancelled be cause of the dealh of Mrs Roose velts brother G Hall Roosevelt Mrs Roosevelt was not present at the informal meeting in the pres idents office George T Summerlin the state departments chief of protocol ushered the Windsors into the presidents office just before noon He then left The president Duke and Duchess then spent about 25 minutes alone The white house Rave no hint of what was dis cussed Mr Roosevelt had met the Duke before Their first meeting was in 1919 when His Royal Highness then the Prince of Wales visited Washington The president then was assistant secretary of the navy He saw the Duke again last winter when the presidential party cruis ing the Caribbean put in at a har bor in the Bahamas and the presi dent was host lo the Duke aboard the American cruiser But this vvns the presidents first meeting with he Duchess Tmmediately before going to the white house the Duke called on Secretary of State Cordell Hull at the state department After that conference newspapermen asked it he was confident Britain would win the war He replied I am absolutely confident of that Earlier he visited Admiral Em ory s Land chairman of the mari time commission and Federal Administrator Jesse Jones with Land he discussed the ship ping situation particularly as it affects the curtailed passengtr routes to the Bahamaislands which the Duke Js governor gen The couple drove from the white house to the British embassy where they are staying The Duchess unattended br embassy officials or police then was driven by a ehaaffeur In keep luncheon appointment i with her Aunt Bessie Mrs Bn chanan Mcrryman at her R street home in downtown Wash ington None of the passersby recognized the Duchess as she walked into the lobby of the apartment house Meantime the Duke had luncheon at the em bassy The duke started his round of official calls early After arrival at the Union station he and the duchess had breakfast at the British embassy Then he drove behind a police motorcycle escort to the Commerce building to talk about shipping routes to the island coiony that have been ad versely affected by curtailment of passenger service from the United States mainland The duchess remained at the embassy while Windsor con ferred with Admiral Emory S Landchairman of the maritime commission The dukes next call was on Secretary of State Cor dell Hull On his round ot visits the duke wore a gray faintly checkered doublebreasted suit a gray shirt and n black and red striped tie Walking briskly from the embassy fo his car he gave a sort of half salute acknowledging the cheers and handclapping from a group of about 50 embassy employes One of them an American girl shouted God British Minister Sir Ronald Campbell a detail of police and Sgt Harry Holder of Scotland Yard accompanied the duke as he walked down the corridor of the Commerce department building The corridor was jammed with government workers who cheered Also attending the first part of the conference with Land was Sec retary of Commerce Jesse Jones Land added that Windsor had expressed appreciation for the aid that the United Stales has given The royal couples train ar rived at Union station at a m but it was not until 25 min utes later lhat the dukes car was switched to the track generally used when President Roosevelt leaves or arrives in Washington Windsor was the first to from the car followed a moment later by the duchess He was greeted by George T Snmmer 1m chief of the state depart ments protocol division and Sir Ronald Campbell British minister They then shook hands with the duchess who returned their treetinr with a broad smile As the firures in the historic romance were escorted across the outer waiting room a crowd ot neary The duke accompanied by Sommer lin walked first The duchess followed escorted by Sir Ronald Campbell DODGERS WIN PENNANT RACE BULLETIN BOSTON Brooklyn Dodgers Thursday won the Na tional league pennant defeating the Braves 6 to 0 behind Whil low Wyatfs fivehit pitching as the Pirates defeated the Cardi Brooklyns dashing Dodgers better known as da Bums Thursday were in sight their first National league pen nant in 21 years Pictured above is a typical Platbush base ball tableau To a rabid Brooklyn Dodger fan no masters canvas could equal this picture in beauty and power show ing as it does the hottnmpered Dodger manager Lipny Leo Durocher in one of his frequent collisions with an umpire This one is Ai Barlick it was Umpire George Magerkurth in the Pittsburgh fracas that cost Leo a S150 fine from Frick 6250 ENROLLMENT SEEN AMES W 1 R Sage Iowa State college registrar predicted Thursday a total fall quarter en rollment of 6230 Enrollment so far totals 5900 he said NOTED CHURCHMAN DIES ATLANTA On IUR Bisllop Warren Akin Candlcr of the Southern Methodist Episcopa church a famed southern church man died at his home Thursday NO ADVANTAGE ON EITHER SIDE AT LENINGRAD New Outbreaks Against Nazi Occupation Rise in Balkans Norway By JOE ALEX MORRIS United Press Foreign News Editor Battles rased without definite advantage lo cither side at Lenin grad and at the gateway to the Russian Crimea Thursday as new outbreaks armed resistance and unrest disturbed nazi rule in the Balkans and Scandinavia A nazi spokesman in Berlin revealed that 2000 German reg ular troops have been dispatched to aid pronaziSerb troops in attempting to quell spreading antinazi outbreaks in Jugo slavia said to center principally around Sarajevo scene of the assassination which touched off the 1011 World war The spokesman said reports Italy has been forced to employ n division of regulars roughly 15 000 men in fighting to put down Serb patriot activity were exag gerated The nazi reports seemed lo indi cate fairly largescale antinazi guerilla activity in the Balkans largely in Bosnia and Croatia The red army reported that it was fifrhlinir steadily increased German pressure against Lenin grad as Adolf Hitler threw more dive bombers artillery and storm troops into the conflict But Moscow dispatches said that on several sectors the Russian counterattacks with infantry tanks armored trains and cav olary had pushed back the enemy much as six miles on one sector Both fides admitted the most intense fighting and the highest casualties without claiming any definite change in progress of the battle generally Nazi spokesmen said that the Germans had broken the back of the outlying Russian land and naval gun resistance but that the inner fortress of Lenin grad was fighting furiously Moscow dispatches told of im portant local successes on un named sectors but admitted lhat the Germans were throwing in reinforcements to keep up the greatest pressure Behind the fighting fronts there were increased rumblings of rouble In Norway where the prnnayi quisling forces were standing by for possible action on the first anniversary of llirir rise power In the Balkans Budapest re ported that 12000 Serbians of the Chelmk irregulars had fought a battle against German troops and   

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