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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: September 1, 1941 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - September 1, 1941, Mason City, Iowa                                t NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME HOME EDITION VOL 3ILVII THI THAT MAKIS AU NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS ASSOCIATED PRESS ANB UNITED PRESS FULL LEASED WOWS FIVE CENTS A COPX MASON CITY THE MIGHT SPOT MASON CITY IOWA MONDAY SEPTEMBER 1 1941 NO 280 TO CRUSH NAZIS New Records Loom as Holiday Thousands Throng Fair IDDBLEACHERS PIMARKOF 6629 SUNDAY AfitoRacei Talks by Governor and Pettit Feature Labor Day j A huge Labor Day crowd gath fed on the North Iowa fair rounds Monday threatening to Iipse even the record attend nce of Sunday when 16629 per jras flocked through the arch jays to watch Emory Collins Ed ie Nicholson and a dozen other peed aces vie on the track Monday the auto races con tinued with Gov George A joas brief speaking appear ince an added attraction for the itternoon grandstand crowd Additional temporary bleachers ivere brought in from Nora Springs daring the night and greeted in the Infield for tbe Monday crowd j The evening showing of Ernie of the show the evening show oungs Revue One cocky HUle bird Jasper ded by a special speaker the repeated laughs from the fev T J Pettit of Boone who audieilce he insisted upon as scheduled by the Mason City answering questions as rades and Labor assembly to other blrds and Mlvcr a Labor Day address at 30 oclock With the weatherman smiling i the 1941 exposition for the ird straight day Monday fair KcJals began to check attend PROGRAM school i5 Open class livestock par de 30 p day address Ijthe RevT J Pettit Boonc Up Youngs Revue nd hippodrome acts I TUESDAY PROGRAM Golden Wedding Day a buildings open D public Free state admission 3 all children uuder 12 years of ft through day 0 a 4H club emonstrations Floral hall Mason City lunicipal band grandstand 1 P S Miller Cir leA Ranch Rodeo track up asked of oirecting their performances The Monroe brothers comedy team acting as a pair drunks on their bounding rubber plat form not only furnished most of the laughs for the show but of fered some remarkable acrobatics as well TThe Skating girls Jimmy Evans footijugslerand i featuring close liar bn songs the Vaudeville program horsemanship juve ile riders Dickie Corbin Fort Forth Tex national champion owgiyj Buster Martin Mary ler Veldene Strauss Earl itraoss Hippodrome acts I p Mason City lunicipal band grandstand P Ranch Rodeo fongress of trick riders Okla oma Slim world famous clown faxine Martin high school and umping horses Horse show In harjc Roy Strauss livestock uperintendent Hippodrome cts ice records of past years look g toward a new high for the je day showing I The CircItA Ranch rodeo Tuesdayand Wednesday was Jtpected to keep entertainment linded North lowans pouring nio the gates for further fun nd thrills The more than 50 owboys and cowgirls are sched iled for both afternoon and vening performances on both ays Bronco riding Brahma bull ding calf roping steer bull Jgging and the dance of the mge the quadrille on horsc ick will be among the regular ideo events on the program In idition there will be trick and iicy roping Oklahoma Slim the orld famous clown and his mule gga and Maxine Martin with 3r fancy high school and jump g horses Applause echoed and reechoed rough the stands Saturday and jnday nights for the outstanding mdeville acts presented in con ation with the night show Ernie oungs Revue Breathtaking were the grace ul gyrations and acrobatics of Jie Four Arleys on the stage tnd of the two Arley sisters Regie and Irene 85 feet above he ground They are reported to x the only persons in the world to do a headsland atop an 85 foot pole They use no nets or other jafety devices Raymonds Birds snowwhite ckatoos with spreading golden resls that hauled each other in aby carriages rang bells did mplc problems in arithmetic nd waltzed in time to the music Troops Jam Stores With Spend Spree By JERRY T WITH ARMY IN ARKANSAS AND LOUISIANA W i t h more than in their pockets the nearly 400000 troops of the second and third armies massed in these two states were on a spending spree Monday that Streamlined neon lighting in the biggest carnival everto be featured at the North Iowa fair is shown in this time photo taken during the evenings festivities Only those celebrants who were stationary for a half minute were registered in the cameras negative The midway light ed by huge towers stretches for nearly a half mile along the fairgrounds Lock photo Nazis Admit Red Offensive South of Kiev Northland Greyhound Bus Drivers Strike on Holiday Weekend MINNEAPOLIS driv els strike tied up bus service of the Northland Greyhound lines in seven midwest states Monday The strike called at the height of the Labor day weekend af fected thousands of vacationists at resorts in northern Minnesota and Wisconsin Officials of the amalgamated association of street electric rail way and motor coach employes AFL ordered the strike at mid night Saturday in a dispute over a pension plan which the union charged was a violation of con tract Thief Goes Through Window Takes WATERLOO thief who forced open a window stole from the postal Telegraph com pany office here it was reported to police Sunday Weather Report FORECAST Finnish Peace Rumored But New Intensity Marks Fight Germans Assert Russ Efforts to Recross Dnieper Are Repulsed By THE ASSOCIATED FRESS night andTuesday erate temperature MINNESOTA Partly cloudy a few widely scattered light showers in north notquite so cool east portion Monday night Tuesday partly cloudy and warmer scattered showers northeast IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics Maximum Sunday 81 Minimum Sunday night 48 At 8 a m Monday 68 YEAR AGO Maximum 70 Minimum ft Precipitation trace The figures for Sunday Maximum Saturday 92 Minimum Saturday night 75 At 8 am Sunday 79 YEAR AGO Maximum 67 Minimum 54 Precipitation trace Yippee Rodeo Tuesday bronc busters trick ropers buildoggers and other stars of the plains will be featured in the rodeo which opens Tuesday at the North Iowa fair Dean Buck nee of Philhpsburg Kans one of morethan 50 champion cowboys and cowgirls in the rodeo is shown above in a trick roping stunt axis and an uneasy armistice in BritishRussian i n vad e rt Iran marked Monday second anni versary of he European war The Germans acknowledged that he Russians were on the offensive along the Dnieper south of Kiev when they said thai continued attempts by the rtd forces to recross the river with the support of gunboats had been repulsed in bloody fashion The high command said that 27 Russian monitors and gunboats had been destroyed on the Dnieper north of Kiev during the past week Still another red army counter offensive was said to have been checked in an undesignated sector and 86 of the numerous tanks em ployed were said to have been de stroyed including eight of the 52 ton variety This counteroffensive was reported by DNB On ihis day start of the llth week of the Russian sampaign the German high command also an nounced capture of 11432 red army prisoners 238 cannon 91 tanks two armored trains and a great quantity of war material in recent battles in which the Ger mans wrested from Russia the Es tonian capital Tallinn Rumors to the contrary the Finns refused to quit their fight with Russia yet i General O K Oesch com manding general on the Viipuri front said in a victory speeck at Viipuri that by the recon quest of that Karelian city the dictated Moscow peace is no more but there still remained ancient Finnish soil occupied by the Russians w May your success give you strength to carry your task to a final and permanent conclusion he told his troops without how ever saying what Finlands war policy would be when all claimed territory had been regained Hitlers headquarters reported Uboat destruction of four mer chantmen from a British convoy in the Atlantic and in the Gult of r inland the sea approach to Leningrad more than 60 Russian ships were said to be ablaze in German minefields The Germans said that nn the Estonian west coast across a narrow channel from thaTtussiaV held islands of Dacgo and Oesel off the mouth of the Finnish gulf the harbor of Haapsalu had fallen in the German tonia cleanup in Es The RAF and the luftwaffe ex London TU ng the Thames In addition the and strewed mines shipping lanes in German The U S ambassador to Lon don John G Winant who haci been reported as an intermediary the rumored RussianFinnish peace A cessation of RussianFinnish hostilities would shorten the red arrays long battlefront by 500 miles and permit a more concen trated defense against the slowed but still powerful nazi onslaught onihe northern central and south ern sectors Bombs which the Iranians said were Russian fell Sunday on the outskirts of Teheran Irans capital marring the arm istice being negotiated between the advanced British and Ilus sian forces and the troops of the Shah Some civilian casualties were reported The start of the third year of the war found the German army conqueror of the lands of 160000 000 persons locked with the red army in a campaign so intense that the German people appeared to doubt that 1941 at least would bring the great victory Hitler had promised Dispatches from Berlin said the average German was convinced that the latest axis declaration to wage the war to a victorious end took precedence over Adolt Hit lers message of last New Years day which said the year 1941 will bring the completion of the great est victory of our history With the RussianGerman war in its llth week the red army re ported continuing its counter at tacks on the central front and holding out doggedly under heavy pressure on the Leningrad and Ukraine flanks The report that Russianini tiated negotiations for a cessation of RussianFinnish hostilities were under way reached London in a dispatch from tlic Stockholm cor respondent of the Daily Mail The dispatch said Premier Jo seph Stalin had ordered his north ern army withdrawn secretly to the old RussianFinnish frontier giving up the territory won from Finland in the winter war of 193940 There was no confirmation of the withdrawal from British or soviet sources and the Finns de nied officially tfiat they had started peace talk with Russia British Drop Bombs on Island of Rhodes ROME UR British planes raided several localities on the island of Rhodes in the Dodec anese Islands the high command said Monday causing slight dam age and wounding a few persons Italian forces defeated British at tempts to approach their positions at Tobruk Libya arid the British retired with losses the commu nique said adding that Italian planes bombed froops barracks he Ruhr and emplacements there and Rhmeland industrial centers of Essen and Cologne and the Germans blasted at Hull and DIES OF SLEEP SICKNESS SIOUX CITY P Funeral ser below vices were held Sunday tor Mrs RAF Sam Lipman 67 Sioux Cilys 14 LOSE LIVES IN IOWA MISHAPS Clarion Crash Takes 3 Lives Titonka Man on Motorcycle Killed Fourteen persons had lost theii lives Monday in automobile ac cidents on Iowa highways over the three day Labor Day week end Though the holiday was blamec in part for the unusual toll few of victims were making pleasure were travel ing in trucks The 14 deaths brought the 1941 toll to 371 compared to 323 on a similar date a year ago Two years ago the total was 325 Dead were Wayne McClecry 35 farmer near Mapleton Benny Paul Reyes 21 Daven pnrl Iowa Mrs J II Heidcrkcr about 55 AVallingforct Iowa Doris Stanley Id Kcnsauqua Iowa Merrill Slack 29 Denver Colo Mrs Dorothy Garner 34 Gilmore Minn Arthur Birkland 49 Moor land Iowa Mr and Mrs Chris Johnson 82 and 81 Kanawha Inwa Beverly Kevane 15 Spirit Lake Iowa Alfred E Bailey 30 Siouv City Iowa Theodore W AlberLson J6 Cedar Rapids loua Carl W Johnson 21 Cabool Mo James Montgomery about 32 Kansas Cily Most tragic of the accidents oc curred at Clarion where thiec persons were killed in a hcndon crash 3 KILLED 2 HUltT IN CRASH NEAR CLARION third victim was added Sunday to the fatal ities resulting from an automo bile collision on highway 69 near Clarion Saturday The latest casualty was Bev erly Kevane 15 of Spirit Lake who died at a Clarion hospital Sunday of cerebral hemorrhage and shock Chris Johnson 82 and Mrs Johnson 84 both of Kanawha died soon after the accident Saturday morninfr The two other persons involved in the accident James Kevane 36 and Marcclla Kevane 16 brother and sister of the girl who died Sunday and also of Spirit Lake arc expected to recover ac cording to attending physicians James suffered a lacerated head and face and chest injuries while Marcolla received a fractured left leg and severe facial lacerations Both are still in the Bird hospi tal at Clarion The bodies of Mr and Mrs Johnson were taken to Kanawha pending completion of funeral ar rangements They are survived by two sons and three daughters Jack manaager of the Kanawha elevator Ed Kanawha farmer Clara at home Mrs Ed Daro of Kanawha and Mrs Elma Hill Fort Dodge At the time of the accident Mr and Mrs Johnson were on the way to Ames raveling south on highway 69 and the Kevane trio returning home from the Iowa State fair at Des Moincs ravelin north The accident occurred on an open stretch of pavement 1 miles south of he intersection of high way 1 with highway 65 and was emptied shelves hundreds of store DO EVERYTHING IN OUR President Grimly Warns of Hitlers Attempt to Rule World HYDE PARK N Y ident Roosevelt said Monday that ve shall do everything in em power to crush Hiileiand his nnzi A holiday for the soldicis it was an extra tough working day for many others Hundreds of merchant1 in the maneuver area who ordinarily would have ob served the holiday kept their es tablishments open to accommo date the soldiers Refreshment spots sold out their stocks quickly in most ofthe small towns and even in some of the larger cities near the troop bivouacs Restaurant owners found continuous lines outside their doois Movie houses were packed as were other amusement centers Their holiday coinciding with their midmaneuver payday dur ing the weekend the soldiers were free and anxious to make use of their temporary wealth The payroll was one of the larg est ever turned loose at one time in ihe two slates and because of the necessity for properly guard ing the vast movements of cash the units were paid on a schedule staggered over five days Merchants unprepared for the rush were overwhelmed with business Many of them sold in one day as much as they ordi narilydid in an entire pecially country dealers in to baccos candies and vefrcshments Towns within the maneuver aiea were packed with soldiers looking for some place to spend their wages but because of the crowds around counters many were unable to buy what hev wanted Clerks and waitresses were liaggnrd from handling the boom business German Air Attack on Hull Reported LONDON planes carried out an attack on Hull dur ing the night it was revealed Monday causing some residential property damage and killing and injuring some persons One Ger man raider was brought down forces Mv Roosevelt did not define everything And nowhere in a Labor day address to his country men did he go so far as to say the United States once more should go to war Yet he went further than in any previous public pronounce ment in pledging America to do our full part in conquer ing forces of insane violence let loose by Hitler upon this earli The chief executive spoke with a grimness designed to bring home move sharply to Americas millions a realization of ihe threats which he said had been raised against their fundamental rights by Hitlers violent attempt to rule the world He told them they must sacri fice but lie did not say how much At one point however Mr Roosevelt asserted that there has never been a moment in our his tory when Americans were not ready to stand up us free men and fight Tor their rights The president spoke by radjo from the Franklin D Roosevelt library here on a program spon sored by the office of proftuctmn management We are engaged on a gran and velt warned Forces of insane violence have been let loose by Hitler upon this earth We must do our full part in conquering them For these forces may he unleashed rui this natiim as ue gn about nur business of pro tecting the proper interests of our country The tiisk of defeating Hitler may be long and arduous There arc a few appeasers and nazi sym pathizers who say it cannot be done They even ask me to nego tiate with pray for crumbs from his victorious table They do in fact ask me to be come the modern Benedict Arn old and betra3 all f hold my devotion to our freedom our our countvy This course I have re ject it agnin Instead I know that I speak a ahendon collision No cause for oj the mislvp was known saythat our power to crush Hitler and his TITONKA MOTORCYCLIST nazi forces IS VICTIM NEAR WELLS Enemies know that the course Winters 28 j of Americon production in the past old farm hand was killed i shown enormous Rains year at oclock Saturday night when his motorcycle collided with a truck loaded with hogs on High way no 16 six miles west of Well Minn Boyd was the son of Mr and Mrs Ubbe Winters 5 miles north i east of Titonka He is survived by 3 brothers and 3 sisters He had been working as a farm hand in the Brush Creek area near Wells Minn The body badly crushed in the crash is at a funeral home at Buf falo Center Funeral services are tentatively set far Tuesday after noon DOUBLE TOLL IN 2 OF ACCIDENTS There were two accidents in which two peisons lost their lives Near Fort Dodge a truck and auto mobile collision at a rural road in tersection killed Birkland who was in the car Later Mrs Garner a passenger in the truck died in a Fort Dodge linspital At Audubon Montgomery and Johnston the latter identified through a drivers license found in his burned clothing burned to death when their semitrailer truck and an automobile collided Miss Stanley a passenger in a car officers said was driven by Laven Atwell Burlington died when the automobile struck a sign and overturned in a field between Milton and Cantril Bailey was killed when the load ed gravel truck he was driving and an empty truck collided near a road construction project about 30 miles southeast of Sigoumey Slack burned to death in the cab of his semitrailer truck which overturned after it and an auto mobile had collided near Sigour ney McCleery was killed Sunday night in an accident near Maple ton Highway patrolmen said the car failed to make overturned a curve and and that the product of these in dustries is moving to the battle fronts against Hillcrism in increas ing volume each diiy But Sir Roosevelt said these enemies also know that nur American effort is not yet thai unless ive step up the total of our production and more greatly safeguard It on its journeys o the battle fields these enemies will take heart in pushing heir attack In old fields and new Mr Roosevelts appeal to labor for unstinting cooperation in the rearmament effort wai direct and pointed lie said hat the first acts of the axis dictatorships has been to wipe out all the principles and standards which labor has been able to establish for its own pres ervation and advancement The singlemindedncjs and sac rifice with which we jointly dedi cate ourselves to the production of he weapons of freedom will de termine in no small part the length of the ordeal through which hu manity must pass he continued We cannot hesitate we cannot equivocate in the great task be fore us The defense of Americas freedom must lake precedence over every private aim and over every private interest The terrible urgency of the crisis the president said calls for everincreasing effort in the pro duction of weapons with which to arm men fighting for freedom Enemies all know that we pos sess a strong in strength They know that the navy long as the navies of the Brit ish empire and the Netherlands and Norway and Russia together guarantee the freedom of the seas These enemies know that if these other navies are destroyed the American navy cannot now or m the future maintain the freedom of the seas against all the rest of the world   

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