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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: August 19, 1941 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - August 19, 1941, Mason City, Iowa                             SCHOOL EDITION HOME EDITION VOL XLVII ASSOCIATED PHESS AND UNITED PRESS FULL LEASED WIRES FJVE CENTS A COPY THE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES AU NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS MASON CITY THE BRIGHT SPOT MASON CITY IOWA TUESDAY AUGUST 19 1941 THIS PAPER CONSISTS OfTWO SECTIONS SECTION ONE NO 269 ARMY TO RELEASE SOME SELECTEES UKRAINE WEST OF DNIEPER IS HELD BY NAZIS Russia Acknowledges GermanFinnish Drives Closing In on Leningrad By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Adoll Hitlers high command reported Tuesday that German and allied troops had overrun all Ukraine territory west of the Dnieper river and announced vio lent new assaults against Ihe siegegirt port Odessa on the Black sea On the northern front a red army bulletin acknowledged thai the jaws of a giant GermanFin nish nutcracker were closing in on Leningrad the oldtime capi ta of the czars with bitter fight ing raging only 75 miles south west of the city The German high command further reported the capture of Russian Heet units under con struction at Nikolaev fallen Black sea port including a 35 ODOton soviet battleship a 10 000ton cruiser four destroyers and two submarines Presuma bly most were in the skeleton stages of building In addition the nazi high com mand said German bombers dis abled three soviet warships in cluding a heavy cruiser in the waters off Odessa Authoritative quarters in Lon don commenting on the critical situation in the Ukraine said that the German occupation west of She Dnieper river was not a death blow to the U S S R but that if the nazis succeeded in smashing Marshal Semeon Budyennys army the result would be very serious British military experts said the ability of the Russians to hold on the east side of the swift mile wide Dnieper would depend on Budyennys ing bis Sy It the Germans should force a crossing at one or two strategic it was said there is no other natural line of defense ex cept the river Don 250 miles due east of DnieproPetrovsk Advices reaching London indi cated that the Germans had reached the Dnieper north and south of Dnepropetrovsk im minently threatening the big in dustrial city Hitlers field headquarters re porting that soviet troops re treating to the cast suffered the heaviest and bloodiesl losses de clared hat German shock troops were already storming bridge heads on thelower Dnieper A total of GOOOO red army prisoners 84 armored cars 530 cannon and a vast store of other war booty were captured the German communique said in fighting around Odessa and the lower Dnieper Soviet troops under siege at Odessa were pictured by the Ger mans as under a constant hail of bombs with the luftwaffe smothering all attempts of the Russians to escape by sea Nino big soviet troop transports were declared to have been hit and dis abled by nazi planes raining de struction along four miles of Odessas waterfront The nazis termed it another referring to the BritishFrench withdrawal from the bloody battle of Flanders last year Farlher west in operations around the Ukraine capital of Kiev and the nearby town of Korosfen the Germans reported the capture of 17750 prisoners 42 tanks 123 cannon and an armored train A red army bulletin beat the Germans to the announcement that nazi forces had captured the town of Kingisepp rail gate to Leningrad from the west bring ing the battlefield within 75 miles of Russias second biggest city The Berlin radio broadcast Monday night said that nazi forces which had advanced around both sides of Lake Peipus on the Rus sianEstonian frontier had met at Narva 19 miles west of Kingisepp apparently for a concerted push on Leningrad Finnish forces from the north were supporting the German at tack with a strengthened drive across the Karelian Isthmus The Finns declared Monday night they had taken life lakeside town of Kurkijoki and were within 95 miles of Leningrad from the north Explosives and incendiaries were dropped on the soviet capital in a new night raid in which the Russians said only one German plane broke through The British air force bombed western Germany again overnight and touched off large fires along the Frcrch coast from Dttnkcrque to Boulogne Practicing An Apple Little Carole Rae Kemp 406 First street northwest is practicing the proper technic for the first day of school bhe knows first impressions are important and even if the apple should happen to be a trifle sour such a smile should sweeten almost any clay for Dear Teacher Lock photo Kayenay engraving v SEE INSIDE PAGES Cerro Godo rural schools open Sept 1 Page 12 North Iowa schools plan September openings Page 6 Junior college registration Sept 1 to 6 Page 4 Family parochial school opens Sept 2 Bookmobile fall schedule starts Sept 2 Page 9 Mason City high school registration Sept3 to 6 Page 4 St Joseph parochial school opens Sept 8 Page 8 Mason City public schools open Sept 9 Page 7 900 teachers coming here Sept J8 Page 22 Lists of teachers in all Mason City public schools and rural schools of Cerro Gordo county also will be round on various inside pages CHURCHILL AND LEADERS MEET LONDON CHEERS Prime Minister Will Broadcast Report on F R Conference Sunday LONDON Minister Churchill returned home Tuesday from his bold Atlantic confer ence with President Roosevelt and after being given a rousing greeting by street crowds he plunged immediately into the task of reporting on what he had done He presided over a special meeting of the war cabinet giving a detailed account of his conver sations with President Roosevelt and of the plans to step up Ihe fight against Hitlerism He re ported also on the world survey made by British and American experts who attended the historic parleys at sea Next came the formality of being received by King Georse Churchill had luncheon will the kin and delivered to him a letter from President Koosc velt On the ocean Churchill had delivered to the president a message from the king The public at large must wait a few days for its report direct from the prime minister Churchill will broadcast next Sunday at 9 p m 2 p in Churchill arrived in London in the morning by train from the port where he disembarked Mon day from the battleship Prince of Wales Despite the fact that the Fireboots Battle N Y Docks Blaze 200000 DUE TO FINISH ACTIVE SERVICE IN 41 Three Priorities Will Govern Releases Unless War Outlook interferes WASHINGTON war department said Tuesday it an ticipated that national guardsmen and selectees would be released from duty nftcr an average of about 18 months total active serv ice unless the international sit uation prevented This would be theexpected av erage it said for those who were not released earlier because they fell into categories permitting it New legislation permits holding the men as long as 30 months but the department said it hoped it would not be necessary In keep any individual now in training for the maximum term Approximately 200000 men will be due for release from ac tive service in 1941 the depart ment said and in order that they may reach their homes prinr to the Christmas holidays their release will be accom plished prior to Dee 10 The department announce d three priorities which would gov ern the release of guardsmen and selectees Given first priority were dependency and hardship 1 rionVnnt Billing Uic which j cases In second place were put A 1000 looi Cuw Ma 1 Line pier the Ircighlcr Painteo and caused the deaths of men 21 years ol age or over on seven men Scores were injured July u ism Thev would be ve M Biooklvn walcUionlliicnonUhe Beimel side supplement cd the work ot iiremeu and Cue ti ticks wo i king on the liml in battling the which Wales Despite the fact that hc Allfll It time of his arrival was kept secret ll 11 Kl HW M AN j hundreds of Britons were on UUIILL II III ft 11 IO FATALLY BURNED US AID TO REDS WORRIES JAPAN Tokio Warns It Wont Be Indifferent to Vladivostok Shipments By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Relations between Washington and Tokio underwent a new strain Tuesday as Japan warned the United States that she could not remain indifferent to the shipment of American munitions to Russia by way of Vladivostok The Japanese press also ex pressed grave concern over U S aid lo Russia as pledged by Presi dent Roosevelt and the newspaper Kokumin declared Hitherto Singapore has been the political strategic base and the pivotal center of the Japan encirclement front Now Vladivo stok has become the northern Singapore completing the circle Simultaneously United States Ambassador Joseph C Grew dis closed that lie had been talking with the Japanese government about restrictions on Americans leaving Japan and other problems related to United States citizens Koh Ishii Japanese cabinet spokesman who sounded the warning on American aid to Rus sia denied that the Tokio govern ment intended to hold Americans as hostages in the deepening crisis Ishiis statement referred to Secretary of State Cordcll Hulls assertion that Japan had not given a satisfactory answer on the fail ure to permit some 100 United States citizens to leave aboard the liner President Coolidcr Plane Which Crashed inBrazil Mountains Found 12 Are Injured SAO PAULO Braxil Searchers Tuesday found the Pan air Do Brasil plane which was lost Monday with 13 persons aboard and first reports said that 12 had been injured in a mountain crash The plane which disappeared shortly before 1 p m Monday was found near Sao Paulo The crafts radio had gone dead when the plane was only five minutes from here Among the nine passengers were Prof Philip C lessup of New York internationallyknown lawyer and lecturer and Hush Davics manager of the San Paiilr office of the International Har vester company Davies is a native lhand Sleepyeyed cabinet mem bers and high military officials were at the station for the arri a lr and with them was IK S i Ambassador John G Winant ivho modestly tried without tmicli success o case his way through the crowds to greet Churchill X t Mrs Churchill was the first to greet the prime minister And one ot the first things she said was Mr Winant is here Thereupon Churchill began looking for the envoy and upon locating him personally made way for Winant to get through the crowd At this point a train full of Lon don commuters on the next track recognized their prime ministcr cheers for Mr Churchill yelled an aged man A hundred commuters burst into a roar Churchill puffing like a loco motive on a huge cigar charac teristically clenched in his teeth was bobbing around the platform like a cork on water smiling grin ning and laughing With his wifes arm through his he led an im prompt u form 1 Six ambulances starter from here for the scene of the crash which was in a thick forest about 4i miles from the center of the city Davies telephoned his office to say lhat he was all right and he indicated the crash was not ser PEDRO PEREZ 20 IS KILLED HAMPTON Pedro Perez 20 year old Mexican youth was elec trocuted Tuesday afternoon when he accidentally touched a high tension wire while climbing a tree at his home here He fell to the ground after coming into I contact with the wire Prior to the accident Perez had i cucumbers in the ebster Uty WPA Pere cucumber patch Members procession up the platr Here hundreds of others who realized something unusual was un burst into cheerinfr The prime minister his teeth still clenching his tremendous ciffar waved back nodded and smiled naval cap which i I and a brassbut U uniform which looked very well He wore a naval looked loo small toned blue naval for Churchill looked pressed Churchill complimented A V Alexander first lord of the ad miralty on the way the navy had managed the transAtlantic rip You did it very well he said An obvious feeling of relief over the prime ministers safe return from the submarineinfested wa ters of the Atlantic was reflected in the morning press which said his mission had been rendered particularly hazardous by prema ture circulation of reports of the meeting with the president Second Man Is in Serious Condition After Tractor Fire EMMETSBURG Third degree burns which resulted when a trac tor he was refueling caught tire caused the death Monday night of Roy Christiansen 27 ot Curlew Christiansen was filling the tractor on the K G Staley farm near Curlew from his gasoline t delivery truck The hot mani j fold was believed to have ignited the gasoline Art Buiney 23 who had been j operating the tractor is in seri ous condition with second degree burns Christiansen is survived by his widow and two children A son Gary 2 was killed this summer at Curlew under the wheels of a truck After the explosion both men tore their clothing off and rolled on Ihc ground in an effort to cx tinglish the flames They botli got up and Burncy drove the truck to j the Staley farmhouse one half i mile away From the house the men were driven into Emmefshurg WALSH PLANS TREATMENT for bodies ST PAUL Minn recovered Gen E A Walsh commander of lievcd they the Minnesota national guard prepared to undergo several weeks medical treatment before returning to his post at Camp Claibornc La Board Probes Waterfront Fire Causing Heavy Loss Damage Is Reported Loss of Life May Be as High as 20 instant fire was all over leased regardless of their length of service but in the order in which their service began Mar ried men who desire discharge at the end of the originally set 12 months service were accorded third priority President Roosevelt is empow ered to extend the service ot the army rank and file by 18 months under new legislation and most of those in uniform cart expect tr man federal board convenes Tiles sabotage He believed work day on orders o Commerce man started the fire by carelessly lighted match or from v uLit1 outman siarieo i rctary Jesse Jones for a searchtossing away ing of the fire that killed from four to 20 men and caused damages estimated at SI 500000 on the Brooklyn water front A workmans carelessness possibly in stealing a forbidden srtmke wis blamed liy local of ficials hut lie government stuilieil the possibility of sahn tiiKc as well as The investigation board iiiclucc 1 Frank Stanley of the drpitrf ment of justice Capt R Dcmpwcilf of Ihe roast guard and Capl Georcc Fried of Ihc hiireau of marine inspection and navigation The extent of the disaster could lot be determined until the sim cigarct Drums of oil nn the docks and ship fed the fire and caused ex plosions which sent flames 200 feet in the air No spectator re ported hearing an explosion at the beginning of the fire although Battalion Fire Chief Frew Mycr said he reached the pier at a m one minute ifler tht first i alarmand found both Ihc dock anrl ship in flames from end to end BROWN QUITS INSURANCE JOB Enlisted men of the rpffiilir army whose three year term of service expires prior lo Dec 31 this year will be discharged un less they desire to reenlist and arc qualified to do so Some time ago instructions were issued that soldiers in the regular army would not be al lowed to reenlist unless they i were noncommissioned officers nr had demonstrated an ability which would warrant their ap pointment as no nLOmmissioncd officer nr unless they had spe cialist training The same standard is Ui be ap plied to men who ace 23 year old or okier the announcement saut whether they are selectees or national guardsmen The army said this procedure would result I in steady improvement in the lit a search Iour bodies had been Several persons bc liad seen another on would the deck of the ship as it was towed away from flats where the pier to nearby it was burning om post ot secretarytreasurer of the i fowa high school insurance com panv was disclosed here Tuesriiv made at approximately a uni J form rate so as not to disrupt the I efficiency of units the army said lhat except for dependency harcl or other emergency would not be released while T i i Of the B9 treated in hospital i were still confined and two were in critical condition The New York and Cuba Mail Uphold Barlows Claim of for Bomb were engaged in ma other special training ship men their units ncuvcrs o WASHINGTON7 D C exercises The United States Cmirt of Apj Still assuming thai tins country peals affirmed a district court dej does not become more scriouslr cision that Lester I Barlow for involved in the international sif it is C it b a agreement in 1921 releasing all his ice will depend Tuesday night and Wednesday The Daily Heralds naval cor respondent declared Hitler un doubtedly knew Churchill was somewhere on Hie Atlantic and tha he ordered his submarines and longrange bombers lo find and sink the Prince of Wales at all cosls dent ended jubilantly not quite so cool northwest Tuesday night slightly warmer west and north Wednesday Men Refuse to Work WEBSTER CITY three WPA men refused to resume work on the junior high school addition here Tuesday after de manding the reinstatement of one of their fellow workers who was discharged several days ago The men also demanded the removal of Earl Krcll as supervisor o the of the family were in the patch at the time He is survived by his parents brothers and sisters fN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics Maximum Monday 74 Minimum Monday night 48 At 8 n m Tuesday 65 YEAR AGO Maximum 71 Minimum 57 EXTENDED FORECAST But lie failed Ihe concspon CHICAGO ore I cast for the period from p m The British Broadcasting cor poration in New York broadcast heard in said the Germans REGRETS FOR BOOS GAYLORD Minn Gaylord American Legion Post expressed its regrets Tuesday for boos which greeted Senator Jo nrnt Vi ut ux uuua wincn grceien senator j0 project hut were told the district Iseph H Ball R Minn when he office refused to consider il i spoke here Sunday jknow of the meeting of course and added there were rumors in London that the nazis new 35000 ton battleship Tirpitz had Been sent out in an attempt to inter cept the Prince of A Reuters correspondent aboard one of the British destroyers which escorted the Prince of Wales back to Britain said that not once on the entire trip was a hostile craft sighted in the air on the sea or beneath the sea Tuesday to p m Saturday inclusive Upper Mississippi valley fowa and Illinois Wisconsin and Min nesota except those portions that drain into Ihe Great The temperature will average below normal with cool nights and moderate daytime temperatures Slight rising trend Thursday and Friday beginning northern sec tions Wednesday afternoon Rain fall will average moderate with showers and scattered thunder storms last two clays beginning Minnesota abmit Thursday night aboard the ship as soon as it unloaded varying The fire foot stretch of stem to stern of the ship win almost explosive speed trapping 140 longshoremen and the ships crew of 35 behind a wall of flame Many jumped into the water Others leaped lo btrcos off the pier and stcpjicd from imc to another of Ihc barges tied up alongside until t Ii c y ha reached another pier 100 yards away Three of he crew un able lo swim rluns lo a line on one side of the blazing ship unnoticed by rescuers for 30 minutes until tuss hart drasucd the ship away District Attorney William ODwycr said he had found a workman who saw the fire start as a liny fl on the dock This man said I could easily have put it out with n pail of wa ter or with my vvindbrcakcr if I had had it with inc but Ihc next s ce w epen upon me locaimn claims on Barlows inventions for jot units their schedule of prepnrn in i 512000 ion the assigned missions Barlow who lives in Stamford along the lias received half of the docks and from money appropriated Officer Killed During Arkansas Maneuvers CON WAV Ark JL c 1 Col Roger M Still tfi Columbia Those enlisted men who arc eligible for release anil who de sire to remain on active duly hcyoml the perinil of 12 months may do so either by enlisting in Ihe regular army for a period of three years or by extending on thrir own request their Icrm of aclivc service to Ihc lotal of 3D months now aiilhorizcil bv law Officials paid that lie men eligible for rrlcaso would bn to for disrliarge to their cnm cascf died Tuesday from injuries re ceived when struck by a truck i during maneuvers north of Camp S Robinson Monday SUM was directins traffic ma cimV llh officers the bled attack during early morS recalled that instruc darkness whnn i wcre February di FATHER OF 9 DIES a P Si5a1 BELLE PLAINE suffered in an automobile acci dent 12 miles north of here Sun day had proved fatal Tuesday to of A Iage nockford III father nine chidlron completion of 12 months service The details have not been com pleted covering a similar proced ure for national guard officers but the department airf that in ecn cral their release would be on he samp basis as that of reserve of ficers   

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