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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: August 16, 1941 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - August 16, 1941, Mason City, Iowa                             NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME HOME EDITION THI NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS VOL XLVII ASSOCIATED PRESS AND UNITED PRESS FULL LEASED WIRES FIVE CENTS A COPY MASON CITY IOWA SATURDAY AUGUST 16 1941 MASON CITY THE BRIGHT SPOT TIBS PAPEK CONSISTS OF TWO SECTIONS SECTION ONE NO 267 F R DENIES U S CLOSER TO WAR Reds Fight Bitter Rear Guard Action F NAZIS PAYING BIG PRICE FOR UKRAINE GAINS Russians Declare Defense Especially Stubborn in South By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Selling the soil of the Ukraine at the highest possible price in Ger man blood the red army of Mar shal Semeon Budyenny was tight ing a bitter rearguard action Sat urday in a conflict in which little quarter was given or asked by either side if riclurinir the Russians as making a comparatively or dered withdrawal for a stand on the east bank of the Dnieper river as the German invasion finished its eighth week an au thoritative source in London said the situation on tile whole would appear quite cheerful A Russian communique report ing fighting on the entire front from the Black sea to the Finnish border said the defense was espe cially stubborn in the south It mentioned no specific points but the German military accounts agreed that the Ukrainian struggle was desperate For example these German re ports said in one small skirmish BOO Russians were siain and 200 captured The Germans said their dive silenced seven of Odessas antiaircraft guns and were pounding at roads and rail roads choked with Russian troops in a big encirclement zone em bracing most ot the Ukraine west of the Bug river But the Russians illustrating that they too have bombers said they heavily raided Berlin and the German Baltic port ol Stettin Friday night setting off great ex plosions and files The Germans acknowledged raids by a limited number of Russian bombers Both Russian and German communiques on the course ot the fighting were in the vaguest of terms The soviet information bu reau said there uas fierce fighting on all fronts during the night if if if Aoulf Hitlers headquarters in the field matched this declaration with the announcement that op erations continue successfully according to plan on the entire eastern front London sources said a heavy German attack on a narrow front wet of Kiev had been deci mated by the Russians but ait miltcd the entire Ukraine situa tion was extremely confused In the Smolensk central sector where fighting previously was heaviest the Germans were pic tured as digging in with little in tention of an immediate push SHANGHAI HEARS OF JAPANESE PREPARATIONS Word from high Japanese Ger man and neutral quarters in Shanghai was that Japan was gel ting ready for the possibility of attacking Russia in Siberia in the next two or three weeks if at all this year Such an attack which might quickly cut off Vladivostok as an entry port for U S supplies would increase the necessity of keeping Archangel and Murmansk open NAZIS DOUBT BUPYKNNY CAN FORM NEW The German press questioned whether Soviet Marshal Semeon Biidycnny would be able to form new defense line along the Dnieper river in time to check a German drive eastward lo the coal and mineral lands of the Donets basin in the eastern Ukraine between the Dnieper and the Don The Germans said the Russian withdrawal by land was hampered by the encirclement of large soviet forces west of the Dnieper bend and by heavy bombing of rail lines Any atlempt to conduct targescale evacuation of soviet forces from Odessa and Nikolaev by sea the Germans said would result in another test of naval strength versus the luftwaffc y if The Ucd army reported in Irnse fighting alons the entire front indicating that the fourth liisr German drive to thr east was under way as Ihr cichth week of war ncarcd an end Freight Trains Collide Pictured above is the collision which resulted when two C M St P and P freight trains collided headon two blocks from the Lawler station Friday No one was in jured in the accident Engineers and Firemen Leap Before R R Crash at Lawler None Hurt Wreckage of 2 Freight Trains Cleared From Tracks LAWLER Wreckage caused when two Chicago Milwaukee St Paul and Pacific railroad freight trains collided headon two blocks from the Lawler depot Friday was cleared up by a crew early Sat urday morning Railroad officials Saturday were conducting an investiga tion seeking to determine the cause of the collision Engineers and firemen of both the trains escaped without injury by leaping from their cabs belore the crash The accident occurred on the main line of the Iowa Dakota division Engineer of Train No 91 which was waiting at Lawler for the work train was Walter Leitner of Mason City W R Kerlin also of Mason City was the conductor In charge of the work extra 554 were Engineer Walter Strong and Con ductor John Bnrnett both of Ma son Cily The trains were reported lo have been traveling only 10 miles an hour at the time of the colli sion It was learned that the daily west bound freight between Mar quettc and Mason City was trav eling west while a work train being used lo service Ihe Fred Carlson company Dccorah con tractors which is in charge of pav ing highway 24 between Lawler and New Hampton was traveling east with 8 carloads of gravel and stone The Carlson company has spur track about midway between Lawler and New Hampton ROME ADMITS SICILY ATTACK Italians Say Many Killed in Raids by British Bombing Force HOME UR British planes heavily raided Catania Sicily during the night killing or wound ing many persons and damaging a number of civil dwellings a high command communique said Saturday The wording of the Italian communique was most unusual and was laken to mean lhat the British had blasted the city in force Usually Italian and Ger man communiques minimize the effects of all British air raids It was the second straight night raid on Catania The British planes dropped both explosive and incendiary bombs the com munique said Loyalty French Leaders Swear to Petain Personally Not France VICHY Fiance Henri Petain decreed Saturday that all cabinet ministers includ ing Vice Premier Jean Darlan and all civil servants judge and soldiers henceforth swear fi delity to him personally and not to France The 85yearold chief of stale altering his new totalitarian con stitution prescribed the new oath I swear fidelity to your persor and engage to exercise my dulie for the good of the nation accord ing to the rules of honor and loy alty MARTIN HEADS HOTEL GROUP DES MO1NES Martin Mason City was elected president of the Hotel Association of Iowa at the close of the groups conven tion here Saturday Other officers are Paul McGinn Des Moines vice president and Harold Schaller Des Moines sec retary Approximately 100 attended the convention JAPS WILL NOT LET BOAT TAKE 100 AMERICANS Wont Grant Clearance If Vessel Takes Other Than Official Personnel WASHINGTON h e state department disclosed Satur day that the Japanese government had refused to grant clearance pa pers to the American steamship President Coolidge if it sought to remove the more than 100 private American citizens now in Japan The Japanese foreign office the state department announce ment said indicated hat the Japanese government was willing lo permit the steamship Cooliclge lo enter a Japanese port for he purpose only of taking off Ameri can official personnel Approximately 20 American of ficials now in Japan were among the more than 100 who desired lo leave Japan at this time The state department ex I np rp plained that the question of tO 1 TanSpOrt 1TOODS Report Russia Joins Stop Japan Move LONDON lf The United States and Britain were reported authoritatively Friday to have won a Russian promise on active participation in a stop Japan movement in return for a sharply stepped up program of war aid to Moscow threat of action by the Rus sian armies of the far cast was expected by many observers to put the brakes on the Japanese southeastward expansion in view of the threepower talks in Moc cow which President Roosevelt and Prime Minister Churchill pro posed and which soviet Premier Joseph Stalin quickly accepted The result may be it was said that Japan will stop for the time being at least will the occupation of IndoChina bases and instead try lo serve her own and her axis partners interests by attacks on Siberia lo cut the United Stalcs Vladivostnk supply line Japan to Use All Manchukuo Railroads Man 75 Alleged to Have Tried to Make Dakotan Give Up Land TRIPP S Dak ing charges were brought Satur day against a 75 year old Sclby Mont man alleged to have at tempted to force a Tripp farmer at the point of a gun to deed over his land States Attorney William Schcnk filed the charges against W A Hardy claiming Hardy forced Bert Brown to go to Schenks office after demanding the land deed Hardy left the oJTicc while he deal was beiK discussed and was arrested in his car 200 miles west of here Schcnk said Hardy told him he claimed the land under business dealings la years ago with Brown a distant relative UAW Controlling Power Shifts From Leftists to Conservative Group BUFFALO Pf Y UR The Unilcd Automobile Workers union CIO shitted controlling power Saturday from left wing to con servative factions and went on record against United States en British Intercept Nazi Italian Ships LONDON UP The German ship Norderney 3667 tons and the Italian ship Stella 4272 tons have been intercepted by the British navy during a conlinu admiralty The com ancc of oceanwide sweeps of enemy shipping th announced Salurday muniquc did not say where or trance in a foreign war Tiie shifl in union control came as the convention in ses sion here for 12 days wound up its business with the installa tion of newly elected executive board members and adjourned The convention picked Chicago as site for its 1942 meeting The union went on record unanimously as opposed to Amer icas entry into war but approved aid to those peoples who con tinue to fight against Hitler and his allies Italians List Success of Motorized Units ROME official news agency dispatch dated on the Ukrainian front said Saturday that Italian motorized units had car ried out successfully their first most important mission and were already marching toward new obitclivcs It was not speci fied whal the mission was or whal were Iho objectives but the rfis pslrh said the fiussians had lost when they had been inlcrceptcd heavily in material evacualinir Americans from Ja pan had been discussed belween Ihe state department the American embassy at Tokio and the Japanese foreign office The announcement added that the stale department is continu ing to give its close and serious attention to the questionof pro viding transportation for Ameri can citizens desiring to return to the United States framvJapan as well as for other Americans else where The state department announce ment said In accordance with its policy of assisting Americans abroad lo return home during the present world disturbance the department hasrecently had under active consideration the question oC pro viding transportation to the Uniled States for those American citizens in Japan who desire to return to this country and whose plans for return have been dis rupted by the recent cancellation of regular sailings of IvansPacific passenger vessels from Japanese ports Consideration was given by this government lo Ihe possibility of diverting to Japan for this pur pose with the proffered cooper ation of the American President Lines the Steamship President Coolidge which was scheduled to leave Shanghai on Aug 14 on its homeward voyage The time available toward effort to make Ihe necessary ar rangements was short The mat ter was discussed between the department of slate the Ameri can embassy at Tflkio and the Japanese foreign office U de veloped that amoiiff American citizens who desired to take passage from Japan at this ime there were approximately 20 officials and something over 100 private citizens The Japanese foreign office indicated that the Japanese gov ernment was willing to permit the steamship Coolidge to enter a Japanese port for the purpose only of taking off American of ficial personnel Under these circumstances it has seemed advisable and has been decided that the steamship Coolidge adhere to her regulai schedule and proceed directly from Shanghai to San Francisco without calling at a Japanese port The department is conlinu itie to qive its close and serious attention lo the question of pro viding transportation for American citizens rtcsirinj to return to the United States from Japan as well as for other Americans elsewhere While no officials made any rmroediaate comment on the Jap anese governments action it was assumed the action had been taken in retaliation against the United States because of Ameri can freezing orders Under the freezing order sev eral Japanese ships have been permitted to enter and leave American ports but the cargoes discharged in this country have been frozen QUITS BUSINESS IOWA was made here that Atlantic and PacificTea company would quit business Saturday rieht Nn an noiinccnicnl of reason is made for this aclion SHANGHAI UR Japanese authorities have advised all for eigners visiting Manchukuo to leave before Monday so that Ihr railroads may be devoled lo troop and military supply transport well informed quarters repnrtec Saturday Peiping reported that the Jap anese had told foreigners now vis iting ManehuUuo that unless left before Monday they could no be guaranteed train accommoda tions Trustworthy sources here n derstood that the Japanese would take over all railroads in Manchu kuo Monday in order to move supplies for their 400000 troops now in the country and lo permi further troop movements from Japan Informants said that the Japa nose had met considerable difficul ty in transporting troops and sup plies due to railroad breakdown and that they had been compellec to send in rolling stock from Ja pan as well as Korea President Franklin Roosevelt and British Prime jMinister Winston Churchill exchanged hearty liand cjstsp at sea IK Churchill prepared to depart from the U S S Augusta at the termination of their historic con Standing behind the president is his son Ensign Franklin Roosevelt Jr 2 Women Seriously Burned on Farm Near Mason City Mrs H Thoron 4x and her daughter Miss were seriously Edna Thorcn 21 burned nt their arm home about 3 miles south of Mason City Saturday noon Neighbors who helped extin guish the fire which burned the kitchen of the home badly stated they believed the fire sumcrl when the stove blew up The mother was burner more seriously than the daughter Both were taken lo the Mercy hospila in Miison City for treatment The farm on which the Thoixm reside is known as Ihe Chevrolet I farm on Highway 65 soulli of Ma son City Clarence Harper of Dmnniil and Charles Sellers of Rovvun were passing the home al the lime ot the accident and look thr women to the hospital No one else was al the home at Ihe time SEES PRESS AS BOAT DOCKS AT ROCKLAND ME Roosevelt Asserts He and Churchill Are in Complete Agreement ROCKLAND Maine Pi President Roosevelt asserted Sat urday hilt he and Winston Churchill were in complete agree nent on all aspects of the war situation but that he did not hink that the United Stales was iny closer to entering the conflict Because of their epochal high seas conlerence lie expressed his views at a ress conference aboard the white louse yacht Potomac immediately liter returning to shore from his wilh Ihr British minister While Ihiisi conferences pro duced un eighlpoint declaration pf the aims nf heads of the twn English speaking nations Air Kooscvclt Saturday said thai lilt next step would bionly a further inlci chance of ideas lit gave no iniiicntion of any aclion that might be taken to im plement the statement of policies which he and Churchill enunciat ed Thursday The chief executive ivas asked whether he was in complete agree ment with the prime minister on all aspects of the war situation and he agreed on that point When n reporter remarked that his words embraced apparently the far east ns well as the far west the chief executive asserted that he supposed there was not a single seetion of a single continent that was not discussed in the meetings at sea Are we any closer lo entering the actually 1 reporter in cjuirrct Mr Roosevelt said he should say Brave Driver BUFFALO Iowa i a story of a man who defied dan ger to drive a burning automobil a mile and a half and back it int the Mississippi river to extin guish the blaze Ezra Coins of Buffalo wa welding a coupling tor a traile on the back of his car wilh torch when the gasoline lane caught fire Endangering his own life he jumped inlo the machine and raced lo the levee at Buffalo By Ihe lime he reached there Ihc en tire rear of llic machine was ablaze The gas tank did not ex plode He backed the vehicle inlo the river and submerged it far enough to extinguish the flames Wilkins Member of First U S Contingent to France Succumbs DES MOINES General Harry E Wilkins 80 who served on General John Pcrsh ings slaff during the World war and with Pcrshing a member of the first American contingent to land in France died Friday night He had been in ill health sincr he fractured a hip in s fall in Feb ruary 1040 Wilkins who served 32 years in the army and national guard be fore his retirement in 1919 was admitted to the United States mili tary academy at West Point in 1382 and after graduation served wilh several infantry outfits be fore going to the Philippines in 1901 Death of lowan at Camp Forrest Probed CAMP FORREST Tcnn An army board of inquiry Satur day investigated the death o Lieut Wayne Frederick Martin 24 Iowa City Iowa who was found dead in his barracks Thurs day with a bullet wound in his head The nrmy wihhek an ex planation of Martins death pend ing completion of the boards re port PLAN PRESSURE ON JAPANESE Members of Economic Defense Board Also Study Free French Aid WASHINGTON eco nomic defense board headed by Vice President Henry A Wallace will direct its first efforts toward exerting trade pressure on lapan and siding free French territory in Africa it was learned Saturday The board created by President llooscvclt to direct economic war fare against the axis formulated Ihe program at a meeting this ck Wallace confirmed thai the two projects were under way but declined to discuss them The board will meet again next week The nalure of economic meas ures lo be laken against Japan could not be learned It was point ed out however that the govern ment already holds the instru mentalities for completely shutting off trade at any time desired Jap anese funds in the United States have been frozen and can be used only with treasury permission All trade with Japan is under licens ing restrictions which can be used to stop it entirely Aid to the Free French is ex pected to lake the form of ices of palm and vegetable oils produced by the do Gaullist Gov ernments in central Africa U is understood that the Free French have about 500000 of these products available Their purchase by the United Slates would serve the double purpose nf providing the Free French with a market hey desperately need and at the same time prcvenl Germany from acquiring vegetable oils in which Ihe rcich is deficient Board official it was learned believe Hint Germany possibly might acquire Ihe oils even though the dc Gaullist forces arc fighting the axis 809 AIRPLANES JOIN WAR GAMES Will Participate in Louisiana Maneuvers for 500000 Troops By JERRY T BAUICII WITH THE ARMY IN SOUTH WEST ARKANSAS Nearly HOD airplanes including some of Ihe armys fastest and newest bombers and pursuit planes will participate in HIP Louisiana war games for troops it was learned officially Saturday Lieutenant General Dclos C Emmons chid of Hie air force has designated some 150 planes ti operate with third army in south Louisiana and approximately 350 wilh second army in the northern sector of the state These air units will simulate bombing of troops ami towns in the maneuvers area will go through the motions of strafing soldiers marching along roadways and deploying in the hills and swamps of Hie battleground The camouflaged planes exjicclcct lo participate in Ihe armys first use of paracluito troops during the September war gatucs The president scalpel in tin ivardrmmi if lie Potomac wilh llic press jammed ariuiml him described his nicclliiR w i I h Churchill as eminently success ful bill he declined lo reveal where it look plate or linw Inns it had lasted Xor Mould lie dis close Churchills whereabouts at present V Tlie reasons for silence on this point ho aid were obvious Ho snici he even bad objected lo a prior announcement thai he was landing al Rockland Saturday but finally remarked lhat it had been foggy on the way over and that if any submarines had fired tor pedoes they had not bee sighted After describing at length the church services held on he quaf Icrdeck of the British battleship Prince ol Wales last Sunday the chief executive said everyone present felt this had been one of Hie great historic services Ho listed the representatives nf the army navy and aviation ser vices who had accompanied him and said Ilicsc men had held in dividual and group conferences with corresponding representa tive of Britain He nulriiliil that he and Churchill hail conferred tar more than one day and said there had been an inlcrchanec of views rclalinjtr In thr pres ent and future ami a swappine of informalinn that was mark edly successful if On Ihe question of nirf lo Rus sia Mr Roosevelt sairt there had been a discussion of fitting Rus sian needs to an already existing program Russia will not he given leiirl Icase aid Ihe presidentdeclared tnn pny for war MOKRKIt RAISES OTTUMWA T Henry Foster of John Morrcll and company here Saturday an nounced lhat hourly paid em ployes of the packing firm will be given o cents an hour wage increase and lhat women arc to be raised B ccntx an hour The incroasrs are rclrnactivr to Aug 11 Weather Report FORECAST IOWA Partly clmidy Saturday night and Sunday occasional light local rains extreme west Sunday little temperature change MINNESOTA Partly cloudy Sat urday night Sunday consider able cloudiness followed by lighl local rains soulh and west in afternoon somewhat warmer noilh Sunday MASON CITY weather statistic Maximum Friday iUinintim Friday nicl Al R a m Saturrtnv IOWA WOMAN KlilKO G R F E N F I F L D i s because she Thomas Kennon nf Creston was i equipment fatally injured in a cartruck cj j He left w doubt riat he was sioiiconfident that Russian resistance would continue through tiic win Icr asserting IJicre wr sort of an assumption to that ef feet IHissia nrcris imincflinatelr avaliable material for next sum mers campaign Insaid but also will need other things lhat can ar rive by the time n spring cam paign opens WASHINTON valiant word intn action the United Slates and Great Britain Saturday undertook decisive steps designed tr fulfill the aim of President Kooscvclt and Prime Minister Churchill lo hasten thr final destruction of niizi tyran ny While any further military naval or diplomatic discussions r decisions by Ihr President and primr minister remained unni clsrd probably will sav sMIc rods until thry air ir romphshrd fictsimmrriiaie r tion WHS taken to provide nil Rl YFAH AGO Maximum Minimum Kl fij   

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