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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: July 23, 1941 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - July 23, 1941, Mason City, Iowa                             NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME HOME EDITION VOL XLVII ASSOCIATED PRESS AND UNITED PRESS FUU LEASED WIRES FIVE CENTS A COPY THE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS Hot Weather Is Fun Youngsters Use Heat as Excuse for Swimming Party While thenelders complained about the heat Tuesday afternoon the youngsters used it as an excuse for a swim ming Here is Carol Ann Garland 2 daughter of Mr and Mrs C F Garland 740 Birch drive emptying the spnnkhng can on John Behrend 2 son of Mr and Mrs Earle Behrend 737 Nmth street northeast Tubs scattered about the backyard of the Garland home provided minia ture swimming pools for the neighborhood tots Lock photo Rayenay engraving Fort Dodge Reports 102 as lowan Dies From Heat Wave Weatherman Forecasts 105 Degrees to Be Recorded in State DES MO WES heat seared Iowa Wednesday as he hot spell hovering over the middlewest was credited with at least one death in this state The weather bureau forecast a top of 105 degrees late Wednes day afternoon Leo H Adams 43 overcome by heat while threshing on a farm south oi Webster City lapsed into unconsciousness Tuesday night while being taken to Webster City and died enroutc By noon the mercury had reached 102 ii degrees at Fort Dodge Other readings during the noon hour were DCS Moincs 98 Centervillc 94 Cedar Hapids 83 Ottumwa Omaha 93 Davenport 89 Muscatine 90 Waterloo 97 Off to a running start Wednes day morning the mercury shot toward what may be a new record for July 23 The previous top mark for the date was 102 set in 1934 The weather still will be relatively cool however com pared to the state heat mark of 118 degrees set in 1934 Tempera tures averaged 8 degrees above normal Wednesday The weather bureau forecast cooler weather Thursday but admitted this didnt mean much and readings probably will reach the 100degrec mark afain Some concern was expressed for the condition of Iowa corn if tjhe excessive heat continues Meteorologist Charles D Reed explained the warmer weather is maturing corn rapidly but about four days of temperatures be tween 95 and 100 degrees would damage the crop and cut yields He held out little hope for im mediate relief There is a pressure area in the northwest of cool air he said but it must Mercury Hovers of 91 in Mason City The mercury hovered omi nously around the 91 mark from noon until 2 oclock Wcdnesday aflernoon in Mason Cily move into the scathing furnace of the middiowest and it is ques tionable how much immediate re lief will be forthcoming There is a high pressure area alonff the Atlantic coasl thai is holdmp heal in the middlcwest ui Sald A sudtlcn breakup of this coast pressure might brinr a quick change here he added but explained it didnt appear likely to break up fight away Scattered showers are forecast lor Thursday afternoon and may bring some temporary relief An unofficial 103 at Leon was the hignest temperature reported Tuesday Carrol listed an official 101 and Inwood Clarinda and Keokuk had 100 degrees The loxv night was 67 at Decorah Estherville and Clarinda ASK WAGE BOOST SIOUX CITY ofi Ihe rising cost of living police and firemen pelitioned the citv council for a 10 per cent wace boost MASON CITY IOWA WEDNESDAY JULY 23 1941 MASON CITY THE BRIGHT 1 PAPEK CONSISTS OF TWO SECTIONS SECTION ONE NO 246 FRENCH BOW TO JAPANESE NAZIS DECLARE RED LOSSES IN BATTLE HEAVY Russians Report Lines of Fighting Are Being Maintained BULLETIN Dispatches from London late Wednesday said the impression was gainin ground that Ger manys 10 day old second biff offensive against Russia was ex hausting itself in Ihe face of formidable soviet resistance and the difficulties of maintaining supplies A British news agency report said German vanguards which reached the outskirts of Smolensk key city 230 miles from Moscow on the central front had been driven off By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS German bombers left scores killed and wounded in Moscow Wednesday and reported that vast flaming seas engulfed the soviet capital while on the fight ing front Adolf Hitlers high com mand declared Russian troops were suffering extraordinarily sanguinary losses everywhere It was Moscows second succes sive night raid The Russians while admit ting casualties fires and bomb wrecked homes declared the Moscow assault was a failure They also insisted that soviet troops were sUI fighting in the same zones as Tuesday Hitlers headquarters pictured the red armies as falling back along the entire front in the 32 day old struggle suffering terrific losses in attempts to relieve eri circled units German press dispatches re ported the destruction of 92 Rus sian tanks in a battle south of Kiev the Ukraine capital Tues day and DNB the official Ger man news agency asserted that nazi and Finnish troops had knifed deep into Russian lines on the northern front cast of Lake Ladoga In the Ukraine Die nazi high command said German Ruman ian Hungarian and Slovak troops are continuing their pursuit un a drive toward Kiev On other parts of the eastern front enveloping and annihila tion of small and big soviet groups continue The German communique said that bombs of the heaviest caliber and showers of incendi aries inflicted serious destruc tion in Tuesday nights dusk todawn attack on Moscow and that fires set Ihe night before were still raging out of control By contrast the Russians offi cially declared that the raid was a fizzle with most of the lufhvaffe beaten off and in per cent of them shot down Amid conflicting reports from Moscow and Berlin on the Isml fighting the Germans declared that nazi legions had scored im portant gains on the central front storming key defenses of Polotsk in a violent twoday offensive with grenades and flamethrow ers Red army troops were report ed wiped out by the tens of thou sands as they fought to the death from shellsmashed bunkers Polotsk lies 140 miles north west of the vital Smolensk sector Nazi dispatches said the en circled remnants of several Rus sian divisions were destroyed with 4000 soviet corpses littering the battlefield northeast of Zhito mir 85 miles from Kiev on July 2i Many thousands of prisoners were reported captured f The Russians GermanFinnish penetrations on the northern front and a deep ening nari thrust into the Ukraine but declared fighting continued Tuesday on the same shelltorn central front with the nazi onslaught still checked First German reports described the second overnight raid on Mos cow as turning midcity areas into a sea of flames with heavy hits around the Kremlin and Red square and fires touched off in the government building district to the east The Russians said dozens were killed and wounded and some fires were started but no military objectives were hit They report ed 13 of 150 raiders downed compared with 22 of more than 200 shot out of the sky the night ocfore and declared only a few Scores Killed in 2nd Raid on Afoscou GRANT DEMAND FOR INDOCHINA MILITARY BASE Ice Blockade SIOUX RAPIDS was a sizzling hot day here but amazed motorists found highway 71 blocked with ice near Rem brandt Newton Scojlt Sioux Rapids ice man lost a load with four tons in hundred pound cakes when his truck skidded on a soft shoulder The ponderous truck and load rolled over twice and cakes of ice slid in all directions One big chunk skated 280 feet down the highway Scott escaped with minor in juries but collapsed from shock after trying to retrieve hisload NAZI CONSULS HELD BY S Wont Be Released Until Americans Are Safe in Portugal LISBON Portugal pelled Italian diplomats held six hours aboard the United States naval transport West Point after arrival here were ordered re leased Wednesday but their Ger man colleagues detained The 220 Germans were beinfr held until three special trains bearing American consuls em ployes and families from Ger many and Germanoccupied countries have safely crossed the Portuguese frontier The Italians were released when the American consular party from Italy crossed the Portuguese bor der Molorbuses were waiting at the quay to take the Germans on a tour to Sintra where a luncheon had been C Ger man colony to welcome them out of America But Ihe Germans and Italians were told they would not be al lowed to leave the West Point until the American legation had informed the West Points cap lain that all Americans had ar rived safely in Portugal Special police precautions kept the crowds of Germans Italians and Portuguese away from the dock Only a few chosen ones were allowed aboard after pains taking identification by Portu guese police and ship officers Despite the early hour scores of people were on hand to watch the big ship nose her way up the Tngiw river towards a berth near Ihe American Export line ships The West Point formerly America left New York eight days ago with 500 passengers for her first transAtlantic trip She will pick up American con sular officials who have left Germany and Italy on the re turn voyage if Germans and Italians lined the ships rail as a United States naval crew prepared the trans port to be moved into berth United Slates naval attaches for Porigtial and Spain came out by pilot boat and boarded tic Wesl Point outside the harbor As the West Point moved into the harbor four special rains bringing United States diplomaU rrom Germany Italy and occu pied territories were Spain toward the Portuguese frontier the search thundering raiders got through light patterns and barrages GERMANS REPORT ATTACKS BY RAF The Germans reported British bombers attacked again overnight this lime striking into south western Germany instead of at the usual objectives in the north west The British said overnight raid 3 by German planes was on a small scale confined to eastern and northeastern coastal sections Attacks on President Roosevelt intensified anew in the German press pushing war news off the front pages Newspapers charged the president with intriguing against Germany in Bolivia which sent a nazi mijiitser away this week and moved to stamp out an alleged nazi plot agains its government War Wreckage in Minsk This wreckage was described by German sources as a street sco in Weather Report FORECAST MASON CITY Highest temper ature Wednesday afternoon be tween 95 and 100 Partly cloudy Wednesday night and Thursday scattered thun dershowers Thursday following a temperature of about 95 IOWA Partly cloudy Wednesday night and Thursday scattered thundersbowers Thursday cool er west and central Thursday MINNESOTA Cloudy thunder showers cooler west and north Wednesday night Thursday cloudy to partly cloudy show ers cast andfouth cooler IN iAIASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics Maximum Tuesday 91 Minimum Tuesday night 71 At 8 a m Wednesday 78 YEAR AGO Maximum 05 Minimum Precipitation trace Powder Warehouse in Spam Explodes SEVILLE Spain en tire powder warehouse less than four miles from here exploded with terrific force Wednesday Fire swept the warehouse after the blast which shattered win dows throughout the city Merchants going to disposeof pups Soiled articles odds and ends remnants broken sizes this seasons merchandise and oth er items that are slowmoving Merchants call them pups and theyre going to turn them loose on Mason City Dog Days Watch tomorrows GlobeGa zette then youll know when and where to go hunting Knox Declares New Military Moves Expected in Far East Says Navy Readyto r Do Whats NeeHed to Carry Out U S Policy WASHINGTON nf Navy Frank Knox Wednesday said there wis no question but that recent developments in the far east including the Japanese governments establishment ofi radio and cable censorship on in formation from thiil country meant new military movements in the far cast Knox told ljs press confer ence 1 look for movement out there very soon lie declined however to dis cuss the possible direction of such a move saying that nn one can tell at this point whether it will BO north or south The navy department Tuesday informed President Roosevelt that the Japanese had established cen sorship and at his press confer ence President Roosevelt said he considered it significant but re ferred questioners to the state department when asked if he ex pected it to be the prelude to an aggressive action in the orient Sumner Welles acting secre tary of state arranged to receive Hie Japanese ambassador at 3 p m E S T Wednesday amid increasing signs that the United States was preparing new notice to Japan on the threat of military moves in thefar easU The navy secretary was astcd Ihe United States fleet was in position to do whatever is necessary to carry out our policy in the far east Smiling Knov said yes and declined to elaborate ft was not disclosed whether Welles or the ambassador re quested a meeting but all indica tions were that the envoy would nese intentions making it clear at the same time that the Unites States was vitally interested in maintenance of the peace of the Pacific Somefn eastern txpcrli ex pressed the view Wednesday thnt underlying Japans reported new demands on IndoChina wis a ToUio determination to place Japanese forces in easy striking distance of the rich Dutch East Indies and Britains naval base slratejtii SABOTAGFlS MARSHALL CRY Assails Petitions to Avoid Extension of Draftees Training WASHINGTON G e n George C Marshall denounced Wednesday as sabotage of a dan gerous character what he said were organized efforts to liive draftees petition congress against extending the service of selectees and national guardsmen The chief of staff testifying be fore the house military commit tee in behalf of an extension as serted there had been an organ ized effort by countless outside members of the petitions against forces to have first army sign the proposal Word or the activity Marshall said came from Lieut Gen Hugh Drum commander of the first army We cannot have a political club and call it an army Marshall said forcefully adding that the situation could not be ignored and that the men Involved would have to be treated as soldiers He did not amplify the state ment At the outset of his remarks Marshall told the committee he r rz Kirhia RapaTC Kichipa Buro Nomura is an in frequent caller at the state de j partrncnt and his visit Wednes day was linked with widespread reports of Japanese preparations for some military stroke Welles was expected to ask Admiral Nomura to clarify Tana Hitler Effigy Hanged Near Allison ALLISON Adolf Hitler save ALLISON Adolf Hitler gave two Allison women the fright of their lives Tuesday nigh Mr and Mrs Bob Hunerberg and Mr and Mrs Eldon Williams were returning home along the road from Clarksvillc at about II Pm The women were in the front scat of the car On a bridge about half a mile south of Clarks vilic they were startled by a swinging figure of a man apparently that Upon investigation it proved to be an excelsiorstufted dummy dressed completely in pants coa vest gloves shoes and hat Red paint denoting blood was scat tered liberally on the bridge In the pocket was a note In case of accidental death please notify Franklin D Roose velt and John Bull that they need not worry anymore Adolf The men notified Sheriff Franl Neal who brought the effigy to Allison Wednesday morning No clues were available as to who was responsible for the inci dent said he had been pressed for approval of plans to send additional troops to Trini oad one of the southernmost of the new bases obtained from Britain he had refused because of the legislative restrictions on the service of selectees and guards men 76000 Japanese Homes Inundated by Typhoon TOKtO typhoon which roared in from the Pacific ocean changed course before reachin Tokio but 76000 homes were in undated here Wednesday by tor lential rains The typhoon crossed the entrance of Tokio bay early Wednesday then veered through and Ibaraki prefecture into the southeastern Pdcitic Move Seen as Possible Attack on British Singapore Stronghold VICHY France has no ob jection to granting Japanese de mands for temporary occupation of military bases in French Indo China if French sovereignty is not impaired a spokesman for the Vichy government said Tuesday night The statement regarded as ad mission that the French have ac cepted Japanese demands or air and naval bases in the Saigon area said that Japan desired In protect IndoChina against attack by British Chinese and free r rencli forces Japan has not presented mv ul timatum to France the spokesman saio and Germany has not inter vened in Vichy in behalf or the Japanese demands The spokesman said Japan had demanded bases as a temporary nilitnry measure to defend Indn Chma againsl DoGaullists the Chinese and the British Do Gaullists arc followers of the leader nf the free French move ment Negotiations on the Japanese demands ire continuing in Vichy nl in Hanoi seat nf Admiral Do Coux governor general IndoChina the spokesman said France sees no inconvenience in Japan temporarily occupying military bases in IndoChina on condition such occupation docs not menace IndoChinese integ rity and French sovereignty the spokesman said France cannot defend Indo China alone She had proof of that in Syria EMBASSY ANNOUNCFS AGREEMENT K BACHED W A S II I N G T O N The Japanese embassy announced Tuesday that it had received a re port that an agreement has been reached between Japan and Die Vichy government relative to French IndoCliina No details of Hie agreement were available immediately AMERICANS HKITISII ANXIOUSLY WATCH Bv THE ASSOCIATED PKESS Far cast dispatches said Wed nesday Japan has made sweeping demands for concessions in south ern French IndoChina possible springboard for an attack on Bri tains great naval base at Singa pore and that the French had yielded W Simultaneously a Reuters British news agency dispatch from Hanoi the capital of Frances oriental colony said it hail been con firmed thut the Japanese had demanded Hie use if facilities in southern IndoChina By facilities it was assumed the Japanese mean airfields and naval biises Conferences between French Admiral Jean Decnux governor general of IndoChina and Major General Rnisho Sumiin chief o tlic Japanese military mission were said to be oitimiinR al Hanoi with the end not yet in Washington and London watched the tntica situation with mount ing anxiety Berlin loo kept an eye on de velopments which might affect United States aid to Britain and Uuna and the German radio de clared According to news available here the Japanese government rned that British aims are directed at French IndoCbina Ihe Japanese government is determined to defend its interest with all the means at its disposal against such intentions The Drench government is likewise be lieved to share this view In London ForciRn Secretary Anthony Eden told parliament that the British government was keenly aware of persistent rr porls o the effect that the Jap anese covcrnmcnl intend to take action to obtain naval and air bases in southern Indo Eden declared flatly that alleged British designs on either Indo China or neighboring Thailand Siam were entirely nonexist ent Japan already holds air bases in northern IndoChina and has troops garrisoned at Hanoi and at Haiphong chief northern seaport Widespread reports have indi cated she would also demand footholds in Saigon chief city of   

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