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Mason City Globe Gazette: Monday, July 14, 1941 - Page 1

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - July 14, 1941, Mason City, Iowa                             NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME HOME EDITION VOL XLVI1 ASSOCIATED PRli THE NEWSPAPiR THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS FIVE CENTS A COPY FULL LEASED WtHEfi MASON CITY IOWA MONDAY JULY 14 194T MASON CITY THE BRIGHT SPOT THIS PAPEB CONSISTS Of TWO SECTIONS SECTION ONE J ONE gg CHURCHILL RAF TIDE MOUNTS HIGHER Growing Air Power of Britain Stressed by Prime Minister LONDON unshak en by 10 months of German ail blows has begun hitting back with fearful might and still is only at the beginning of her growing air power Prime Minister Churchill told thunderously cheering civil defense workers Monday The prime minister delivered virtually the same fighting mes sage to 6000 clamor ing veterans of the defense London in a great review in Hyde park and later to a luncheon of the capitals organized civil defenders 11 is time the Germans should be made to suffer in their own homeland and cities something of the torments they have twice in our lifetime let loose upon their neighbors and upon the the prime min ister exclaimed We have now intensified for the past month a systematic scientific and methodical bombing on a large scale of German cities and industries and other military objectives We believe it to be in em power to keep this process going on a steadily rising tide month after month year after year until the nazi regime is either extir pated by us or better still torn lo pieces by the German people themselves We shall continue a remorse less discharge high explosive upon Germany He declared there can be no truce or parley with Hitler or the grisly gang who did Hitlers uorst and forecast that Italy too would get her share of the RAFs attention 46 As the nights grow longer lhe prime minister said that un happy province of Germany any which used to be called Italy will A spectaculai accident in which a car struck the guard rail ot a bridge six miles north of here on highway 65 and then somersaulted into the creek beneath it failed to in jure two Austin Minn men early Sunday The picture above shows the wreckage of the ear in which the two men Dobald R Dial the driver and Paul Embrickson were riding at the time of the mishap Both men suffered minor bruises but were otherwise unhurt Dial told Sheriff Tim Phalenthat he was forced from the road by a truck which was m the center of the bridge Embrickson said he was asleep at the time by Lock moment enter upon another For the moment there is a lull but we must expect that before long the enemy will renew his attacks upon us I do not hesitate to say that an enormous advance United States toward making of Londoners and of men and women in our provincial cities in standing up to the enemys bom bardment The crowd laughed when the prime minister said Hitler had very large air forces close is not because he likes us bct ler He pledged anew that we the i mi v in i iiiLii oLULUS IU Will U ttlClT have its fair share contribution to British resistance But he stressed Londons need thoroughly effective lias been for unrelaxed vigilance against largely influenced by the conduct new terror from the skies and r warned the workers to prepare for renewal of your exertions We shall not turn from our purpose however somber the road however grievous the cost be cause ve know that out of this time of trial and tribulation will be born a new freedom and glory for all mankind Yon do your worst and we will do onr best Churchill ad dressed a remark to Hitler Perhaps it may be our turn soon Perhaps it may be our turn now The prime minister acknowl edged that when the nazi air might first fell in force on Lon don he suffered anxiety for its effect on morale health and necessary services but he said London responded with nit which has been the rock that has made Britain unconquerable He forecast vehement German retaliation but now he said London is ready and London can take it Our methods of dealing with Germannight raiders have greatly improved he mentioned They no longer relish their trips to our shores It is not true to say Ihey did not come ihis last moon because they were all engaged in Russia I do not know why they did not come but it may be be cause they were saving up But even if it should be so the very fact that they have to save up should give us confidence byvvxp revealing the truth of our steady AR AGO advance from an almost unarmed position to a position at least of STRIKES BRIDGE GOES INTO CREEK Minnesota Automobile in Spectacular Mishap as Two Escape Unhurt LOOK INSIDE FOR Two Austin Minn men escaped with only minor bruises early Sunj riny morning when the car in which they were riding hit a steel af guardrail of a bridge six miles is not because he likes m hM saulted into a c we shall prosecute to the end this righteous war for freedom and the future of mankind and said We shall not turn from our purpose but we can only achieve that purpose if we have behind us a nation sound to the core and in every fiber Weather Report FORECAST IOWA Partly cloudy Monday night and Tuesday somewhat warmer Tuesday MINNESOTA Partly cloudy to cloudy scattered light showers east and central Monday night Tuesday partly slightly warmer cloudy and IN MASON CITY top creek on its side and Donald R Dial the driver said that he was southbound on high way 65 when he neared the bridge and found it blocked by a cattle truck heading northward in the middle of the paving Rather than risk a headon collision he said he drove off the paving on to the shoulder but lost control of the car and it crashed into the rail on top of the bridge abutment Both Dial and his companion Paul Embrickson were taken to the Park hospital but were only slightly injured according to Sheriff Tim Phalcn who investi gated lhe accidenl The sheriff reported that the car had ploughed up the shoulder of the road tor 100 feet before hitting the steel rail which it tore right through Embrickson the passen ger said that he was asleep at the time The bridge is a short distance south of the intersection with the highway to Plymouth The acci 74 55 68 ociuality and soon of superiority to them in the air At the luncheon Churchill de plored that wo live in n terrible epoch but he told the men and women of the civil defense viccx we believe there is broad and sure justice running through its theme Britains air blows now are stronger than the Germans and will remain so he promised the outdoor throng until we have beaten down this horrible tyr anny The courage of Londoners under an unexampled strain he declared not only enabled us to come through what many might have thonjrht a deadly peril but Impressed Itself upon every country and rained us scores of millions of friends in the United Stales rn r iu riyrnouin me ac LriooeCrazelte weather statistics dent happened just after 6am Maximum Sundav 71 Iowa Man Hit by i Stray Bullet Dies LANSING Iowa Cooper 73 of Lansing who was struck in he abdomen by a stray bullet last Monday while sitting on the porch of hk home died Maximum Sunday Minimum Sunday night At 8 a m Monday Maximum Minimum 73 50 The figure for Sunday Maximum Saturday Minimum Saturday night At 8 a m Sunday YEAH AGO Maximum Minimum 65 MARSHAL HENRI PETA1N His Bastille Day Talk Omits Word Liberty PAGE TWO CelebratioiTWil Be Held at Emmetsburg STATE PAGE VICHY APPROVES SYRIAN TERMS Says Earlier Insolent Political Ultimatum TransforrheH BULLETIN CAIRO Egypt IP The armistice ending the war in Syria was signed at Acre in Palestine at 2 p m Monday 7 a m General Sir Claude Aiichinlcck British com mander in the middle cast an nounced Monday night VICHY The Vichy gov ernment has approved terms of the armistice for ending hostilities in Syria an official communique said Monday The governments approval was given a statement by the Vichy war office said after an earlier political ultimatum which could not have bcun signed without dishonor had been trans formed into an honorable mili tary convention F R TO PRESS FOR EXTENDING DRAFT PERIOD President Marshall Reveal Need to Keep Selectees Over Year WASHINGTON Roosevelt and Army Chief of Staff Gen George C Marshall Monday told congressional lead ers of both parties of the neces sity for holding selectees in the army for more than a year of ser vice on the basis of secret infor mation compiled by the intelli gence services of the armed forces j The information was conveyed to the legislators nt a white house conference which lasted two hours and IS minutes The coiiffrcssionil leaders were understood lo have advised Mr KooseveK and Marshall thai senate and house opposi tion lo the retention of selec tees would be serious and pos sibly overwhelming Senate Democratic Lender Alj ben W Barklcy Ky said how ever that a decision had been reached to have the senate antl house military affairs commit tees begin hearings immediately on the proposed legislation It would empower the army to retain selectees national guards men and reserve officers for the duration of the emergency and remove restricUons on theiruse outside this heniisphere arid out lying U S possessions Bark ley said there had been no decision whether Mr Roosevelt would send congress a message insisting on the legislation But another member ot the congressional group disclosed that Mr Roosevelt was told he faces a knockdown dragout battle and probable defeat on extension of service for selectees His conferee said it was ecstcd thai Mr Roosevelt em phasize extension of the term of service for national guards men and reserve officers and seek to induce many of the sc leclecs lo reenlist voluntarily Participating in the conference with the president and Marshall were Barklcy Chairman Robert man oer The war office said the governj IJReynolds of the senate military Democratic Lender John W Mc authorities on the condition that Free French representatives be excluded Espinosa Benefit Will be Friday SPORTS PAGE Opportunity If you are a younsr man and wish to know of the many op portunities offered by the United States navy write or ask the Navy editor GlobeGazette for a free booklet EverythinK You Want to Know About Life in the U S Navy which will be Sivcn without any obligation CoFounder of Fisher Body Company Is Dead DETROIT Kvcd Fisher eldest of the seven famous Fisher brothers and cofounder of the Fisher Body corporation which la rvntVr corporation which La Crossc Wis hospital figured prominently in the f Physicians snH ho n ui f ni inc automobile industry died Henry Ford hospital LI Sunday Physicians said he died shock following the accident RAID TOLL IN JUNE ONLY 399 Cormack Mass Chairman An drew J May D Ky of the house military affairs committee and Representative James Wadswortb R NY I The congressmen made it clcar 1 after the conference Ihat Marshall i ind the president had presented I even starl as a basis for the legislation Marshall discussed the silua T ownnM fn TI trenail uiscusscd me siiua IUINUUN ministry of i lion vcrv frankly and fulhfor home security announced Monday the members present bul I cant that only 35 persons were killed in air raids on Britain in June the lowest of any month since Julv 1940 Seven men are missing and be lieved killed the ministry added and 461 persons injured in raids are detained in hospitals The July 1940 totals were 258 killed and 321 hospitalized The nations heaviest home front casualties of the war were in September 1940 when were killed and 10615 hospitalized Among the 399 known deaths in were 175 rncn and G4 children i60 women The June total brought raid casualties for the past 13 months in which official figures arc avail able lo 9498G includinE 41488 Killed and 5349S hospitalized In this connection it was re called that only recently Britain announced her total military cas ualties had passed Ihe 100 1 mark reveal anything he said Kark Icy said Marshalls presenta tions were very convincing The only definite decision was that committees in both house and senate will begin hearings at once affecting selectees national guardsmen and reserves he added It was not determined whether Mr Roosevelt will send a message to congress There was no agree ment as to details of the measure that will have to come after com mittee hearings have developed the facts bul we did agree to ahead and make the effort Barkley said that the auxiliary proposal to abolish the prohibition against service of guardsmen se leclces and reservists beyond the confines of this hemisphere was not discussed That was nol gone into at all he said Wadsworth indicating that Mr Roosevelt remained adamant in Russians Tell of Smashing Air Attacks MOSCOW URSmashmg as saults by the red air fleet were reported Monday by the soviet high command apparently bring ing the nazi war machine again to a halt in the vital Pskov Vi tebsk and Novosrad Volynsk sec tors The high command reported that soviet planes for the third clay launched heavy bombing at tacks upon nazi mechanized and motorized columns and concen trations close to the advance areas and heavily attacked the airdromes from which the luft waffe is supporting the German offensive There were no major en casements of land forces the high command said and the positions nf the major fiRhtinK fronts remained subslanlially unchanged The red air fleet again pound ed objectives in Rumania which have been the subject of repent ed attacks since the start of the war The city of lasi Jassy on the Prut river the Ploesti oil fields and the important railroad junc tion of Roman all in Rumania are bombarded heavily But the afternoon communique reporting no big battles during the night added that there had been no changes of consequence anywhere along the front It was asserted that tiie Russian air fleet continued to bomb Ger man airports and that during the night Russian planes had bombed lasi and Roman in the Rumanian frontier area and the important oil fields of Ploesti which have been hBmmercd frequently evei since the RussoGerman wai started A Rumanian communique Broad Broad casting corporation said three oil tanks had been set afire in a Rus sian raid on the Ploesti fields and that there had been a number of civilian picked up by Columbia from Ihe British 82 TURNED IN BY ANN CASEY SPORTS BULLETIN DAVENPOPxT IP Phyllis Otlo IS year old defending I champion of AHanlic Iowa burned up the Davenport coun try club course Monday morning o set a record wilh 7G in liic qualifying round of the loiia Slate womens Bfllf tournament Ann Casey of Mason City and Kathleen Carey of Cedar Rapids each shot 82 for second low scores among early finishers Sioux Rapids Man Is Fatally Gored by Bull SIOUX RAPIDS IP Glenn M Presel 47 prominent stock raiser whose purebred Hampshire hogs had won more than 50 grand champion awards at county was gored to death by a bull lie was a member of the National Hampshire Breeders association Swine Breeders Association of Iowa Swine Growers Association of Iowa and the Farm Bureau the face of unfavorable reports from his congressional leaders said that the conference touched on all kinds of we STATE 2 ARE UNDERWAY FOR LENINGRAD Germans Assert Russian Armies Falling Apart as Climax Is Neared By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Kiev is tottering under com bined air and land assault Mos cow no longer is protected from German panzer thrusts by the Stalin line nnd Leningrad is caught by a German frontal drive and a Finnish flank offensive Germans asserted Monday They declared that red armies were fallint apart nnd that the campaign was rushing lo a climax on his the 23rd day ot the east ward push fortes were reuorlcil hammering al the gates of Kiev anil Berlin wailed expectantly to hear that the ffaleway to the Ukraines richest industrial and farming regions had been forced German planes rained dcstruc tion on Kievs warehouses and hangars and even destroyed Ihe citys waterworks i wassaid That was the picture to be pieced together from the words of authorized German spokesmen DNB the official news agency slight he daily communique from Adolf Hitlers headquarters The German fuehrers heart quarters said Finnish troops had opened an attackin Marclia on both sides of Lake Ladoga in the sector closest to Leningrad The main strength of KIR powerful soviet army is brok en asserted DNB lhe official German news agency renortinc also Ihat blitzkrieg Iccions had slashed through the main Stalin line defenses at an de cisive points Dispatches from Ankara Tur key reported thai soviet Rovcrn ment officials were preparing to move from Moscow although thn Germans nrc still some 00 miles from the mi capital nnd that the British mission had already rcnetl to Gorki 50 miles cast By contrast the Russians aflcr reporting that the OODmil front was aflame with a series of gigantic new battles over the weekend declared in Monday mornings communique that nn major fighting took place durin the night and that there had been no significant changes in the struggle in the last several hours In London authoritative quar ters said lhe nazi drive toward Leningrad was the most dan zrrous luit Ihrtl Berlin claims of litrgc gains rcRnrilnd as extravagant The Germancontrolled Holism siid the fall of Kiev f Ukraine capital was to he ex pected at any moment Jubilantly Propaganda Minister Paul Joseph Goebbcls proclaimed to tnc German public press and radio that there is no salvation for the soviet armies The decision in the east has al ready been attained As for a separate peace with Kussm the Germans made it clear that there could be no question ot compromise Tiie retch it was said had a mandate from all Europe lo liquidate bolshevism 1 mllitnry dispatches snid inat in storming across the strate gic Dnieper river on lhe central front guarding Moscow German dlnotdiscuss a compromise troop had encountered a powcr ihc importance of the situation f1 soviet defense sector 30 mili was admitted by everybody and I deep in trenches raimibts nrt a bcltcr Xcw of and further guarded by what the predicament is Waris worth said By predicament I mean the fact that we arc just starting to Set an army trained and now must would not decide whether we should take the chance of tearing to pieces an army that is just ccltinR Kood termined captain plowed ward Monday without Fritz Wei demann and Dr Hans Borchers expelled German consuls general who missed the boat on purpose then spent 12 hectic hours Irvine the Pacific they would be risking seizure at sea Two hours or so after the Ya wata Maru sailed word came from the British embassy in Washington that the nazis would not be molested enroutc long to catch it The two top ranking nazis rej tubed to board the NYK liner Wicdcmann thru iriir vmn ut Ul HU laVata MtMll Wllll rr 4 11 nllll 1TICU iriln and may at ay I and famiiies Sunday that the Yawata turn about and come back for them at the Ger man governments expense But the Japanese master replied these words our greatest regrets we are unable to accept request to return This didnt stop Wicdcmann the San F ran Cisco consulgeneral was once Adolf Hitlers commanding officer He tele phoned Ihe Japanese embassy in was sorry Please express lines main ofi turn about Tokio and the fice there and the Yawata was flashed to a halt some 90 miles at sea awaiting developments Wiedemann then sought trans portation to the Yawata Without success he attempted to hire a sea plane or boat He asked the coast guard for a cutler and the navy lor a deslroycr Bul he was told that neither branch could give him an answer until it was de cided whether the Yawala would Try to Catch It Then near midnight the Ger man embassy in Washington in ftrmed the consulate here that the Yawata Maru is too far out and there is no possibility of her turning back Dr Otto Dcnzcr the ousted viceconsul here said he could nol book scats aboard a clipper plane for Tuesday which would enable the Germans to catch the Yauata at Honolulu so the Ger mans decided to sail July 31 aboard the Japanese liner Taluta Maru There was no word from the state department Dr Denzer said concerning the Germans delay in leaving the country The deadline originally was last Thursday There remained a possibility that the naris could fly cast and loin other German and Italian consular officials and agents leav ing via the Atlantic on the liner West Point swamps and meandering streams German engineers swirmcd intn the boglands wearina snowshoe fikc swamp walkers so they sink in the muck it and floated numerous bridges to get troops and tanks across German military cnmmcntatur declared Leningrad in immediate danger with nazi troops cast of Like Pcipus and less than 15n miles from the city Reports were heard in Helsinki that the northern Estonian city of Narva 80 miles from Leningrad was un der German siege The Germans reported Vitebsk captured and a gap torn in the central Stalin defense line through which panzer divisions were said to be pushing toward Moscow less than 300 miles away The Russians acknowledged German forces had crossed the Dnieper river on the central front out said the red army recaptured   

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