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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: July 3, 1941 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - July 3, 1941, Mason City, Iowa                             V V V r v r A 1 v c NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME HOME EDITION VOL XLVH 3CLATED PRESS AND UNITED PRESS FULL LEASED WIREU THE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS TheuToo Are Americans What of the Future of 2 Americas EDITORS NOTE This I another of a scries of articles written by w Earl Hall Mason City GlobeGazette managing editor In the course ol a lour through South America as one of M party of 12 mestj or he Carnerie Number 99 By W EARL HALL ON THE ATLANTIC OFF VIR trade war cotton and books are the subjects touched on in the following thumbnail in terviews with members of the Carnegie Endowment for Inter national Peace with whom for the past two months I have been as sociated in a tour through South America Doctor Samuel Dale JMyres Jr director of the institute of public affairs at Southern Methodist university In the world after the war is it going to be possible for agriculture of our two American continents to deal on a cooperative basis No one of course can pre dict the changes which the war will involve At present the ag ricultural systems of North and South America are basically com petitive Both regions raise wheat corn cattle sheep and hogs They send huge surpluses into the world markets where competition is be coming increasingly keen The war by closing numerous Euro pean markets has aggravated the situation Perhaps the restoration of peace will bring some relief There are already signs that American agriculture can adjusi itself to new conditions In Bra zil for example coffee growing has rapidly given way to cotton In U S cotton is being replacec by cattle and sheep In addition to such develop ments I look for an increase ol international controls to deal with surpluses have ex perimerifed with such controls over sugar and coffee Other pro ducts will likely be added to the list and international administra tion will likely be more compre hensive and effective V William Henry Ilessler chief editorial writer for Cincinnati Enquirer and foreign news com mentator for radio station WLW do you think might be a predictable course in South America if U S went to war While the United States con tinues to aid England short ol war and while the outcome of the struggle is impossible to foresee all South American states pursue a policy of cautious neutrality None can afford to take the risl of partisanship But if U S enters the war allout and with a determinatioi to see it through I believe mos South American countries will g in also This would stem from two the sympathy of th bulk of South Americans for the democracies against the totalitar ian states and second the desire ol realistic governments to ge on the bandwagon and insure far treatment in any postwar settle ments Brazil I should expect to come in promptly after a United Stale declaration Argentina later am reluctantly to avoid being out maneuvered by Bra7il Eugene Butler The Progres sive Farmer of there anything about cotton produc tion in Brazil that could be studied with profit by the U S cotton industry There is a lesson lor the cotton industry of our country in thi uptodalermcrchandising method used in the sale of Brazilian cot ton The Brazilian bale is neatly and attractively wrapped an steps have been taken to insur that it retains this good appear ance throughout its journcv t market The quality of U S cot ton is fully equal to that of Bra 7M but the disreputable conditio of the American bale when i reaches the foreign market tot often is decidedly against it good product attractively pack aged practically sells itself Lcc Henry Morrison of the Columbia University a way being found in South America o make good books available lo he literate public Books are being made avail able at a low price to the readin public of South America Th problem however is not one o good and cheap books being mad available fo the literate popula tion it is one of increasing tha literate population and for solution to this problem I refc you to Dean Harold R W Ben jamin of the University of Mary land the member of our party primarily interested in clemcn tary educationl This series of daily articles OL South America will be brought t a close in the next issue with III presentation of some significan views by the remaining four mem bers of the Carnegie group MASON CITY IOWA THURSDAY JULY 3 1941 MASON CITY THI BRIGHT IPOT THIS PAPEB CONSISTS OP TWO SECTIONS SECTION ONE NO 228 STALIN GRAVE DANGER AHEAD Germans Claim Russians in General Retreat ASKS DRAFTEES BE KEPT OVER YEAR IN ARMY Marshall Also Seeks Removal of Limit on Service in Hemisphere WASHINGTON yp Gen George C Marshall army chief of staff urged Thursday that draft ees reserve officers and national guardsmen be kept in service onger than one year and asked removal of restrictions which confine the United States armed forces to the western hemisphere In a biennial report to Secre tary of War Stimson Marshall said that events of the past few days are even more forcible in dilations of the suddenness with which armed conflict can spread to areas hitherto con sidered free from attack There are he added legal restrictions on the use of the armed forces which should be re moved without delay It is urgently recommended that the war department be given authority to extend the period of service of the selective service men the officers of the reserve corps and the units of the national guard The selective service act called for a maximum of one year of military training for these groups The act also istinulaied thatthese could not the western hemisphere When and where these forces are to serve are questions to bo determined by their commander inchief and the congress and should not be confused with the problem of their readiness for service Marshall told Stimson All it is believed will admit that the time factor has been of dominant importance in the march of events since Septem ber 1939 in the availability of material in the effect of the complete readiness of huge highly trained units for em ployment in chosen theaters Marshall asserted that the 12 month service period of many now on active duty is nearly com pleted and asked must we re place most of the trained ofticci personnel of a lead the moment of departure for strategic localities I submit Marshall said that the limitations referred to should be removed as quickly as pos sible if we are to have a fair op portunity to protect ourselves against the coldly calculated secret and sudden action that might be directed against us Summing up his recommenda tions Marshall told Stimson These proposals which the war department recommends for ac tion by congress have but one purpose the security of the American people to permit the development of the national de fense on the orderly and business like basis necessary it the dan gers of the present situation are to be met Such a purpose does not admit of delay Man Arrested in South Dakota for Iowa Dog Theft DES JIO1NES a mongrel with characteristics of a Chesapeake retriever was back in a DCS Moincs restaurant Thurs day amusing customers by retriev ing beer he had been the object of a 1000 mile search At a cost of he dog was ob tained from the Animal Rescue league shelter last January by Wallace Long manager of the restaurant and Joe Baker who has an establishment across the street When he disappeared a month ago Long Baker and the customers were angry An information was sworn out in the sheriffs office against Lars Michaelson of Carlisle Iowa who had admired the dog The owners placed a value on Ronnie Polk county deputy sheriffs took Michaelson into custody at Gar den City S Dak whore he was working on a farm The officers said he frankly admitted selling the dog in Harlan Iowa for S150 The dog was picked up on the return trip Said Michaelson in the county Mil charged will crand larceny He sure was a swell dog1 II KneeHigh by Fourth Try to Dump Milk Deputy Sheriff Dies RUTLAND Vt gheriff Ray Russell of Monkton was killed Thursday during a fight that developed when striking dairy farmers attempted to dump i truck load of milk bound for the New York market Russell was riding on a milk truck bound from Waltham lo Verjfennes when strikers at tempted to halt it and dump the truckload of milk During the fight Russell fell from the running board and was crushed beneath the wheels of the vehicle Addison county authorities at once sped to he scene of the clash which occurred in a relatively thinlypopulated section Earlier more than 5000 gal ons of milk bound for the New York milksheds was dumped in hrce towns by men who halted the trucks enroute to plants At Bridgeport two trucks were halted and 6000 gallons of milk dumped on the road after the drivers were halted by a barri cade Eight cans of milk were dumped from a truck making a delivery at a Fair Haven bulk plant and 12 cans were spilled on the road at Verecnnes The Dairy Farmers Union called a milk holiday in Addison and Rutland counties to withhold milk from the New York shed pending agreement in a price dis pute The union is seeking S3 a hun redweightfor blended milk compared with a June price ol That JNortU Iowa corn was kneenigh by the Fourth of July is proved by the above picture of Maribrie 15 year old daughter of Mr and Mrs Paul Matxen wholive on a farm five miles northeast of Mason City Marjorie climbed up a five foot ladder to gel a good look at her fathers cornfield Lock photo Kayenay engraving PALMYRA TAKEN BY ENGLISH Important Airport Station in Western Syria Lost by French VICHY official com munique Thursday night reported that British forces occupied Pal myra important airport station in western Syria at 1 p m Thursday The official announcement said lhat the ancient city fell o the British after a very heavy artil lery bombardment by the British Thursday morning British tanks rumbled into the city at I p m followed by infan try the announcement reported Palmyra had been under siege for U days SOLDIER IS DROWNED MINNEAPOLIS Minn Sgt John Vincent of Ft Snelling drowned early Thursday in Lake Nokomis James Wirth IB acook at the army post tried unsuccess fully to save him Vichy Hears 2 New British Columns Are Invading French Syria VICHY Unoccupied France P advices Thursday said two new British columns were in vading Syria from Iraq in addi tion to those attacking Palmyra and DeirEzZor and that the home of Gen Henri Denlz in Beirut again had been attacked by British bombers BOY 7 DROWNS WABASHA Minn year old John Grass drowned in back waters of tiie Mississippi river Wednesday night His body was found by a searching party when he failed to return home after playing with other boys Trap for Russians 5 Are Injured When Fire Breaks Out in Minneapolis Streetcar MINNEAPOLIS per sons were burned or injured Thursday when fire broke out in a crowded streetcar A control box in the molor mans cab exploded and set fire to the front end of the streetcar About 20 women in the car screamed and rushed for a rear exit Some threw packages and suitcases through the windows Several women were bruised in the rush for the exit Five persons injured seriously enough to require hospital treat ment were Wendell L Monson 25 motorman Irma Swanson 14 Constance May Tracy 50 Hudson Wis Frances Kastei 17 and Ruth Robertson 35 IOWA FLYER BURIED MANILLA Iowa services were held here for Lieut Murro McCrackcn 26 ot Manilla army flying instructor who crashed lo his death near Montgomery Ala Monday He was the son ot Mr and Mrs Harry McCracken Manilla ESTIMATE RED LOSS AT MORE THAN 500000 Declare Soviet Forces Hammered Back Unable to Make Real Stand German BERLIN German ligh command claimed Thursday hat the red armies now are in eneral retreat along the entire 800mile front their power of esistance apparently broken by errific losses estimated by the Jerman press at upwards of 500 IUO men The picture given by the Ger man high command was of sov iet armies desperately falling back under the hammering blows of luftwaffe and panzer attacks against which they no longer were able o make a stand The communique did not how iver make specific claims of ad at any particular points long the tremendous front and here was no estimate of progress n the three big uai hrough the Baltic region toward Leningrad along tiie Minskto Woscpw highway and into the Ukraine toward Kiev The German press echoing indi cations of the high command claimed that Russia had suffered its greatest catastrophe in the de feat at Bialystok in which it was claimed 160000 Russian troops have surrendered and hundreds of thousands were killed anc wounded The high command character ized this battle as virtually con cluded with the destruction of powerful red forces which Russia had massed close to the German frontier The newspaper Nach tausgabe estimated that nt least 000000 Russian troops were de stroyed in that single battle Soviet troops arc retiring along the entire eastern front the high command said re porting lhat German and Ru manian troops had smashed across the Pruth river in the south and were driving toward the Dniester rtver y y tf While German armored col lumns had knifed into soviet ter ritory along the central and north ern part of the fronts it was the first time the high command hac claimed that the Pruth river which runs along the Rumaniar border had been crossed The battle cast of Bialystofc which the nazis now call a battli of annihilation practically ha been concluded he high com mand said reporting that nu merous infantry cavalry anc tank divisions of the soviet armj were destroyed there Germany had claimed the cap lure ot more than 100000 mci east of Bialystok and some naz quarters asserted that many times 100000 Russians had been killed there Shoulder lo shoulder German and Rumanian units Wednesday advancing from northern Mol davia the Pruth and are pushing forward towards the Dniester the high command said Thus allied armies have taken up the offensive along the entire front between the Black sea and Artie ocean it was added Boy 3 Fatally Burned With Water FORT D O D G K caused by boiling water from a kettle which he overturned on himself proved fatal to Alfred Thcis 3 year old son of Mr and Mrs G A Theis The parents farmers near Vincent Iowa and a sister survive Germans claimed capture of 100000 Russians and de struction of a large part of red forces trapped in the BialystokMinsk area Meanwhile attacks were re ported launched from Finland and Germans claimed Win dau Latvia besides Riga already reported taken Germans also reported successes against Russian tanks in the Zloczow and Dubno areas Russians reported their planes were checking Germans in Minsk anc Dvinsk sectors Black arrows indicate Germans white arrows Russians Check Drive of Nazis on Shepetovka Russian MOSCOW red army a big German mechanized drive toward Shepeiovka 25 nilcs inside the prewar frontier of the a war communi lue said Thursday and a great battle is raging in the southern Trent seclor of Tarnopol The communique also re ported that repeated attempts ot German mechanized units o smash across the Berezina river at Vorisov had been checked everywhere in defense of the road leading to the big railroad center of Smolensk and to Mos cow Fighting nn the southern front protecting the rich Ukraine was chiefly in the former Polish sec tor surrounding Taruopol on which two enemy drives con verged from Lwow and Luck but the communique referred to a big German push toward Shepc tovkn inside the prewar Ukraine frontier and 170 miles from the city of Kiev The communique reported in tense fighting on two main fronts in central and southern Russia 1 On the central front German mechanized forces thai swept pas Minsk to Borisov on the Berez ina river attempted severa times to cross the river but these attempts were checked every where Borisov is 52 miles eas ot Minsk and about 7 miles in side the prewar Russian frontier the deepest point of Germar penetration 2 On the southern front fight ing continued inside the territorj of former Poland with a grea battle raging in the Tarnopol sec tor guarding he prewar border of the Ukraine The German advance in south ern Poland was following tw main routes by way of Lwow ant Luck with Kiev as their main ob jective In the Luck seclor n large Ger man mechanized force followed by motorized infantry clrov southeastward toward Shepetovk EARTH BEFORE NAZIS ADVANCE Calls for Universal Guerilla Warfare Is Certain of Victory MOSCOW Toscf jtalin called upon the Russian people Thursday to meet the ad German armies with a scorched earth policy and vitli universal guerilla warfare He warned his people they wera menaced by a grave danger and icknowledged that already AdolC tillers legions have captured Lithuania most of Latvia western white Russia and part of the west ern Ukraine y But he cried it was recog nized at home and abroad that ours is a just cause that the enemy will be defeated that we are bound to win Stalin making one of his rare speeches attributed nazi successes thus far to Ihe fact that the war of nai Germany on the U S S R began under conditions favor ve in an effort to break through U Tarnopol defenses Tarnopol is i Poland about 25 miles from the Ukraine border but Shopetovk is inside he Ukraine proper Our roops checked cncmv units toward Shepetovka in flicting on them heavy losses the communique said without slating the exact position of the fighting Part of this group attempted lo break through southward toward Tarnopol Throughout he night our troops by stubborn fighting halted the advance of Ibis enemy group Fighting continues The communique also reported intense fighting in the Kremcnerz and Zbarazh sectors is midway between Luck and Tarnopol and Zbarnzh is just northeast of Tarnopol The whole area of fighting wns acijacent lo the prewar Ukraine border Weather Report FORECAST IOWA AND MINNESOTA Gen erally fair Thursday night and Friday warmer Friday IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics Maximum Wednesday 70 Minimum Wednesday night SI At 8 a m Thursday 69 YEAR AGO Maximum Minimum 71 13 2 Youngsters Give Hospital 34 Pounds of Money for Bill OMAHA pair of young sters paid cash for lonsillectomies here Wednesday night and chances are theyll be cnling popcorn and yelling loud as liospilal staff counted Sons of a brewery truck driver Edward Sonny1 Nimerkhter Jr o and Richard Richie 3 turned over a quoit jar of nickels and a sugar canister filled with pennies pounds of foot the bill The 700 nickels took care of Sonny and the 3500 pennies fi nanced Richies sore throat Meanwhile Edward Sr is sav ing dimes For what Why a ton sillectomy of course Harris Theatrical Producer Dies in N Y NEW YORK by an appendectomy last March Sam H Harris 69 one of the most successful theatrical managers and producers since the turn of the century died Thursday in his apartment at a m He was producer of such hits as Dinner at Eight As Thousands Cheer Id Rather Be Right and a score of others many of made into movies IOSEF STALIN able for German forces and un favorable for soviet forces Speaking in his role as chair man of the new defense commit tee a post he only recently as sumed Stalin laid down these rules for fighting In case of a forced retreat nf army units all rolling slock must be evacuated Ilic enemy must not be left n single engine a single railway car not n single pound of griin or a gallon of fuel Collective farmers must drive off all heir cattle and turn over their grain to the safekeeping of state authorities for transpor tation to tlic rear All valuable property including nonferrous melals grain and fuel which cannot he withdrawn must with out fail he destroyed In areas occupied by the en emy guerilla unit mounted and foot must be formed divcrsionist Sioups must be organized lo com bat enemy troops to foment guer illa warfare everywhere lo blow bridges roads damage tele phone iind telegraph lines and to set fire to forests stores and transports In occupied regions conditions must be made unbearable for the onemy and all his accomplices They must be hounded nnd anni hilated at every step and all their measures frustrated broadcast at 6 a m fl p m Wednesday C S T and ng popcorn and repented at intervals during the ver before the day on public loudspeaker systems first time lie Russian people had houd Stalins voice since 1936 when he announced the constitu tion Prnvdn Izvestia nnd other morn ing newspapers devoted their en tire front pages lo the text of the halfhour speech together with portraits of Stalin Asserting that millions of Ihp masses of peoples will rise Stalin spcakinsr in measured tones acknowledged that work ers in Leninjtrad and Moscow already had started the organi zation of thousands into peoples armies to support the red army and urRcd similar action in ev ery city under threat of inva sion The Moscow radio announced mass meetings of workers were being held in factories and plants to take action on Stalins appeal Copies of the text of the pre miers speech were pasted on walls throughout the capital by youths in uniforms ot the state labor re serve corps He oxprcjrod crafiturle o Brit ain and to the United Slates and which were   

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