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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: May 26, 1941 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - May 26, 1941, Mason City, Iowa                             NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME E ft HIST MEM 4 Afi T OEPT OF COUP oes MOINES i A HOME EDITION VOL XLVI1 THE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS ASSOCIATED FllESS AND UNITED PRESS FULL WIRES FIVE CENTS A COPY Are Americans MASON CITY IOWA MONDAY MAY 26 1941 MASON CITY THE BRIGHT SPOT I PAPER CONSISTS Of TWO SECTIONS SECTION ONE Costly 5 Miles of EDITORS NOTE This Is mother ot a series of articles written by W Earl Hall aiasou City jlobeGazette editor in tbe course of a tour through South America as one at a party of 1 guesiU of Ibe Carnegie endowment for International Irate Number J6 By W EARL HALL SAO PAULO SRAZ11What said to be the most expensive five miles of railroad construction i in the world lies between Santos I and this city of a million and a 1 quarter some 40 miles apart 1 passed over it this forenoon and found that I had not as I had begun to suspect become immune to scenic wonders I really thrilled i to thebreathtaking panorama in the 50 minute ascent of the 3000 loot mountain range Motive power on the precipitous climb is supplied by cable In the five mile stretch there are five Diesel power houses As one train comes up at one end of a cable another train comesclown at the other end thus providing a sort of Its a wholly ingenious bit of mechanism The road lied is slitter against the side of a mountain with the rocky heights on one side and a great valley of amazing verdure on the other 1hc train noses through 13 separate tun nels All along way elabor ate and expensive engineering precautions have been taken through the incdium of concrete spillways and reinforcements to preclude landslides Average speed up the incline is about ID miles an hour counting the five stops that have to be JTOade for the separate cable units I Speed on the slvaightaway Is more nearly 15 miles an hour A special type of locomotive travels lat the rear ol the train to provide Itpcwefandibrakingiaellities intbe 1event anything happens to the cable mechanism On leaving Santos we pene I tratecl a region of extensive ba I nana plantations in the lowlands I along the ocean Here and there I little inland channels such as the one that makes an island of San I tos had to be bridged On two oc casions we spotted enormous but j terflies with brilliant blue wings I Scientists In our parly estimated fa wing spread of from B to 11 If inches As we approached Sao Paulo evidences of an industrial life bc l gan to show up along the railroad Factories of various kinds became noticeable silk cereal foods roundhouses perfumeries IJa Chevrolet assembly plant just every kind ot plant that one gwoultl sec coming into Chicago or Cleveland Sao Paulo itself is a city of ilreally cosmopolitan appearance day or night My hotel the Esplanade overlooks the central Jplaza in the downtown district lAs I began this letter I could look out of a window 111 front of feme and see skyscrapers which would do credit to all except our largest Xorth American cities blinking neon lights are restive nf Times square in Vciv York PLANES CARRY TANKS TO CRETE Footholds DE VALERA HITS DRAFT PLAN IN NORTH IRELAND Declares Englands Proposal Is Attack en Human Right DUBLIN a Prime Minister Lamon DC Valcra of Eire de nounced Monday the British pro posal to apply conscription to neighboring northern Ireland as a grievous attack on a funda mental human right The dail Eircann was packed as the lanky premier rose to make his second objection against the British conscription plan He recalled to the members who had been called into special session to consider the proposal that lie had protested to the British government even before the outbreak o war There could be no more griev ous attack on any fundamental human right he told the audi ence than the plan to force an individual to tight by force for a country for which lie objected to belong 1 Among his hearers was Sir John i Maffey the British representative i The six northern counties are a part o Ireland have ahvays been a part of Ireland the inhabi tants are Irish and nothing can alter the fact DC Valera added Eire insists that her constitu lion applies to the whole of Irelajnd including the six conn ties of northera or peailinef envisaged nnion of the socalled national territory it excludes northern Ireland from legal jurisdiction of the Dublin government Dublin has maintained a neutral stand in the war liriuni tremens ever saw so many snakes as I have today A caretaker with reckless abandon jerked them out of their domeshaped little homes by the hundreds From one extra poison ous variety he extracted a good supply of venom and topped it off by jerking out a pair of spare fangs Then we saw a snake of the boa constrictor family squeeze a poisonous coral snake lo death and make a meal of first At the laboratory a bit later one of Professor Cavalcantis aides to hold one of his asked me snakes It isnt poisonous he assured me How do you know 1 inquired can tell by its coloring he replied That didnt seem to me to be adequate pioof I didnt hold the snake At the governments forest pre serve later we saw literally hun dreds o Brazils tree varieties in a setting of indescribable beauty jThc tree which most interested me was the OIKfrom which Brazil uLvii uiiK wuijnauvc in Asia they were wrong requiring oneway but the land ihey called Brazil by have observed m a I reason of the error remained her South American i Brazil IP Sol its name Explorers thought it iBiodd avenues with reelmcd was brazilwood a precious wood tnlcrs arc numerous here with native to Asia They were wron nffic than I lirnber of othc tics Another point of that automo driver s i s s on the h t as In lierica instead Ion the left as Europe Jjinety n i no of a hun ted buildings Itcience and Viness arc of constmc f there is a roof in P a ti 1 o I Icnt rccn it All arc of tile I sus ll a city ordi covering subject al igh I havent eked on this ly the dan of roof fires I lid be at a liimum Iur afternoon 11led us first llhe famous ji a k e farm lire a staff of fntists under directio of lo f J a y m e Ivalcanti is a notable of work in eloping ser against the lets of snake side of Hcrc is of Ihe railroad running from tains over which the tracks pass SBC moun CIO Strike in Carborundum Plant Begins By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS A strike by CIO workers at the Carborundum plant at Niagara Falls which union leaders pre dicted would be 100 per cent effec tive started Monday morning and threatened the manufacture of grinding wheels and abrasives which company officials said were used in practically every defense industry Company spokesmen said thev expected no appreciable curtail ment of production and said a Sieat many of the 3200 employes were on their jobs V On the other side of the strike picture construction work was resumed on the 530000000 Ka venna Ohio arsenal as officials said 10400 men returned to work after a threeday shutdown which AFL officials said was unauthorized The CIO men at the Carborun dum plant seek collective bar gaining representation AFL officials checked workers into the Ravenna plant saying those held responsible for the threeday shutdown were denied admittance and that unAmeri leaders who precipitated the strike would be tried by their unions Negotiations were to open late in the day at Ravenna on demands fora 25cent increase in the pres ent 65cent basic wage for 5000 common laborers at the arsenal The national defense media tion board conceding that U had failed to settle a ware dis pute between ClOs United Mine Workers and operators of southern soft coal mines made ready Monday to publish its recommendations The board has no statutory pow er to force the opposing sides to accept these but John L Lewis UMW president agreed there wouldoe no work stoppage until they were completed J L Kindelbcrger president of Aorih American Aviation Inc Inglewood Cal took a plane for Washington tn talk over with the board u strike threat by ClOs United Automobile who say they will walk out Wednesday unless the company increases the minimum pay from 50 to 75 cents an hour and grants a blanket in crease of in cents an hour to all of its 11000 employes Pending its consideration of the case the board has asked the workers to continue production on bombers pursuit ships and combat trainers for the army and Britain The company has been turning out such planes at the rate often a day It has about 5190000000 of orders for the United States and Great Britain GILCHRIST IS NAMED WASHINGTON fPt Repre sentative Fred C Gilchrist R Iowa was one of 14 representa tives annointetl Sunday by Chair man Clifford R Hope R Kan of the republican farm siudv com mittee to an executive committee to decide where the organization would hold hearings to get opin ions and assistance of farmers in considering agricultural matters Weather Report FORECAST MASON CITY Partly cloudy Monday night and Tuesday Scattered ihundcrshowcrs and cooler Tuesday afternoon IOWA Partly cloudy Monday night and Tuesday scattered thundershowers Tuesday after noon northcentral and extreme west cooler extreme norih slightly warmer extreme south Monday night cooler extreme northeast Tuesday MINNESOTA Partly cloudy Mon day night and Tuesday scat tered showers Tuesday after noon southwest and extreme south cooler Monday night and southeast and extreme east i ucsday IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics Maximum Sunday 83 Minimum Sunday night 65 At 8 a m Monday 75 YEAR AGO Maximum Minimum Precipitation The figures for Sunday Maximum Saturday 72 Minimum Saturday night 49 At 8 a m Sunday 61 YEAR AGO Maximum RR Minimum 45 Precipitation 37 GO 40 trace F R AIDE SAYS GERMANS MAY BECLOUD TALK Early States Roosevelt Is Rewriting Address Because of Conditions WASHINGTON P Stephen Early presidential secretary said Monday he had an idea that Ber lin is trying to dp anything it can to becloud President Roosevelts fireside chat Tuesday night He made that statement when reporters informed him that the German foreign office was com menting on an interview in which Grand Admiral Erich Raeder commander of the German navy warned the United States against convoys and patroling Early told reporters Ive got an idea Berlin today is trying to do anything it can to be cloud the presidents speech and precipitate something for you gen tleman between now and Tuesday He added that he would not be surprised if reporters were querying him about other dis patches from Berlin before the presidential address The speech had begun to take on new significance from world developments such as the Raed er declaration and Japans seizure in French IndoChina of 000 worth of American products belonging to American firms The address replaces one Mr Roosevelt Have made two weeks ago and Early had told re porters not to build it tip as ot extreme importance But when asked Monday wheth er he thought a similar warning was warranted he said Up lo yesterday I would have repeated the warning Today I can tell you the president will be en gaged through the day into the night and most of tomorrow in revising his speech in the light of rapidly changing conditions abroad Dont ask me to go inlo details because I cant Youll get them when you get the speech Early said the chief execu tive was devoting more time to preparation of the address which will he broadcast inter nationally at p m CST than to any speech he could re call Consulting with him were Rob ert Sherwood the playwright and Judge Samuel I Rosenman of the New York supreme court who have helped in the prepara tion of other important Roosevelt pronouncements The setting for the address has been shifted from the diplomatic reception room to the larger east room of the white house because approximately 300 guests will be present to hear the chief execu tives words All the diplomatic corps of Latin America and mem bers of their families have been invited to be on hand along with some cabinet members and special guests of Mrs Roosevelt The Latin Americans were in vited because Mr Roosevelt had been forced by illhealth to can cel an engagtmeut to attend a re ception planned for him by the diplomats of the other American republics on May 14 Early would offer no intima tions as to the specific nature of Tuesday nights address Nor did he identify what particular phases of international develop ments had prompted him to with hold a warning against building the speech up as of special sig nificance In response lo a question upon Admiral Kacders state ment that convoys would mean shooting the presidential sec rctary said he did not want to go into anything so definite He said the government had had no nfficial reports on sinking of the British baltlccruiscr Hood and he did not know whether the Germans had sent the worlds biggest warship to the bottom near Greenland or Ice land To an inquiry whether Ameri can patrol ships were around during tile battle Early replied that if they had been the govern ment would have had official re ports To permit him to work inten sively on his address the presi dent had only two appointments Monday He skipped the cus tomary Monday morning check up with congressional leaders and there was a possibility thnt if he did not finish in time Tuesday afternoons press conference would be called off Proud British Pipers Enter Addis Ababa F R Signs Crop Loan Rate Bill PRICE MUST NOT EXCEED PARITY Cotton Com Wheat Provided for in Act WASHINGTON Roosevelt signed Tuesday legisla tion providing for loans on major farm crops of 85 per cent of parity but declared that lie had done so with the understanding that farm prices should not be permitted to go above level The legislation the cocalled parity provides for mandatory loans on cotton corn wheat rice and tobacco Mr Roosevelt said in a state ment that the legislation re flected the governments objec tive for eight years and that the fact that farmers did not have and have not as great a share of the national income as other groups But he noted that when the bill becomes law farmers cooperating with the government farm pro gram will be able to receive 85 per cent parity loans plus cash parity payments plus soil conser vation payments in cash Under no circumstances the chief executive declared should the sum of these three exceed par ity x x x I am approving this joint resolution on the distinct un derstanding that parity payments will be limited to the amount nec essary lo bring the basic commodi Ijcs to parity but not beyond parity1 Parity prices arc designed Youths Who Have Reached 21 Since Last Registration Day Must Sign Up July 1 Roosevelt Proclaims f AnomerT HegiSfat ion Needed for Defense WASHINGTON1 Roosevelt Monday ordered a sec ond registration under the selec tive service act on July 1 He said in a proclamation an other registration was required interest of national de registrants will include those men who on or before July 1 have attained their 21st birth day and had not registered prev iously The registration is to lake place alien in the tense New NAZI THREATS Secretary Says Hitler Tries to Induce U S to Refrain From Defense WASHINGTON of State Hull accused Germany Monday of seeking by threats to luce the United States to i m these areas other than those specifically ex empted by the selective service act must comply with the regis tration order if he has reached his 21st birthday since the initial registration Selective service officials have estimated that about 1000000 men will be required to register under the proclamation Governor Wilson and Adj Gen Grahl to Leave for Claiborne miral Erich Raedcr commander of the German navy that the American patrol system was ag giesive and that American naval convoys for British ships would mean shooting Hull told his press conference that Haeders statementappeared to be some sort of threat to induce this country and probably other American nations to refrain from veal efforts at self defense until Adolf Hitler gets control of the high seas of the world and other continents tt is a favorite system which in the case of Iarily puces arc designed to nvc it n T M c T give farmers the same purchasing rP VM 1NL br V jCm Pp A AVjJsnii MnnHiL i power in terms of nonfarm pro ducts as they had during the per iod from 1S09 to 19H Tile legislation requires price pcggine loans on cotton wheat corn rice and tobacco and im poses heavy penalties for market ing abnormal production When it was under discussion in congress the legislations1 sup porters estimated that the pro Rram would assure farmers co operating with this years crop control measures a return of SIIS a bushel for wheat 87 cents a bushel for corn and 16 cents a pound for cotton The forcgoinK figures arc averages and include aovcrnmcnl bene fit payments The proposed loan rates would be Cotton 134S cents corn SP87 cents wheat 9322 cents flue cured tobacco 19 cents fire and dark cured tobacco 84 cent and buncy 1853 cents Government loans on these same crops for 1840 were Cotton 8 U cents wheat G5 cents corn 61 cents and tobacco fluecured 15 cents fire and dark aircured 7J cents and burley 163 cents Secretary Morgenthau Is Inspecting Patrol WASHINGTON Morgenthau is on the high seas Monday inspecting the navys At lantic patrol Officials said that the treasury head a member of President Roosevelts four man cabinet defense committc was the guest of Admiral E J King com mander of the Atlantic fleet Monday said that he and Iowa Adjutant Gen eral Charles H Grahl will leave Tuesday night on a trip to Camp Claiborne La and Camp Bowie Texas Iowa national guard troops and selectees are stationed in both camps The governor said lie and the general will return early next week They will travel by rail lowans at Camp Claiborne are members of the 34th division The 113th cavalry an Iowa unit is located at Camp Bowie State Printing Board Approves Liquor Stamp Purchase by 32 Vote DES MOINES Amid re ported threats of legal action if any other course were taken the Iowa state printing board Monday approved by a 3 to 2 vote a con tract with the Consolidated Decal comania corporation of Brooklyn K Y for the production of 12 mjllion state liquor seals The aye votes were cast by Secretary of Slate Earl G Miller Auditor of State C B Akers and Attorney General John M Rankin The nays were Walter Sharp of Bur lington and Tom W Purcell of Hampton WILL REPRESENT LIONS CEDAR RAPIDS WjIowa Lions clubs have chosen ihe Ce dar Rapids boys Y M C A drum and bugle corps to represent the organization at the national i Lions convention at New Orleans i La July 21 to 25 Hitler has used many countries in Europe said cither by thrcits or persua sion lo induce other countries to refrain from any real defense un til Hitler was ready to seize them The secretary said Raeders j statement seemed lo be an integral part of a program of world con quest by force HEAVY ATTACKS ON CIVILIANS OF ISLE REPORTED Germans Assert Steady Flow of Reinforcements Is Reaching Invaders By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Adolf Hitlers aerial invaders ot Crete reinforced by airborne tanks and seatransported troops penetrated British defense llnes Monday in an attack west of Canen the Crete capital and axis reports asserted that the British fleet had been driven off after suffering enormous losses British middle east headquar ters acknowledging nazi in roads under cover of a violent assault by the German luft waffe said that New Zealand troops were counterattacking and that severe fighting is continuinc in the Canea sector The Germans now apparently had three strong footholds on the 160milelong island in the re gions of Canea Candia and Retimo and the nazi high com mand reported a steady flow of reinforcements was arriving from Greek mainland bases 100 miles away British general headquarters description of the German attack west of Canea pre f erred Malemi airdrome British Tommies along with fighthardened Australians and New Zealanders were said to have Inflicted heavy casualties on the Germans in the 7dayold struggle Reports reaching Cairo said lhal over the weekend the nazi luft watfe had bombarded Cretes principal cities on a terrific scale comparable to the bombing ot Rot terdam Holland when Hitlers invasion armies stormed into he lowland countries last sprinr T v these reports said Crete na tives escaped severe loss ot life by taking shelter in the islands caves which include the famed labyrinth and the Dictaean cave legendary birthplace of Zeus W London sources disclosed thai British marines arc now engaged in the battle but they declined to say whether substantial reinforce ments were being landed to fight the nazi invaders The German high command de clared that nazi warplanes and Italian naval and air forces sank a total ot 11 cruisers eight de stroyers a submarine and five speedboats in the eastern Medi terranean since the conflict began last Tuesday Despite these reported setbacks MajorGeneral T chief of the LOOK INSIDE FOR KING GEOHGE II Has Narrow Escape in Fleeing From Crete PAGE 2 Cardinals Mourn Loss of Infieider Crespi SPORTS PAGE B Heywooc military sion to the Greeks predicted calm I think it will be possible o nold Cictc In London a British spokesman said fighting on the island Sunday was quieter7 but he cautioned Britons against thinking that the German bolt was shot Dispatches from Rome said German troops had been landed on the island from ships pro tected by the Italian navy con voyed through waters the Brit ish fleet had guarded The British acknowledged ihMl a few seaborne reinforcements might have landed but said Ihev were insignificant It was recalled that last week a squadron of Brit ish cruisers and destroyers was reported to have intercepted aii Itahsnguardcd convoy north of Crete drowning 5000 Germans and sinking at least 0 Iroopladcn boats The British reporting the arrival of airborne German tanks said thnt nazi aerial invaders were still holding the important Malemi air port 10 miles from Canea the Crete capital and that heavy fighting raged in the Britishheld sectors of Retimo and Candia in central Crete Authoritative British quarters disputed German claims of a solid hold on Ihe western end ot the island lonirrangc RAF flying from North African des ert airdromes were reported to have entered Jhe fight against nari aerial troopcarriers after KAF fighter planes had been i u11 h d r a w n last week when 1 Cretes few airfields were de   

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