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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: May 19, 1941 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - May 19, 1941, Mason City, Iowa                             HtRLOJ I s r u w D P r or i o S E S M i J 3 Welcome Rotarians Welcome Rotarians THE NIWSfAPIR THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS AOOCIAnD PRESS AND JttNrTE MASON CITY THIS PAPER CONSISTS OF TWO I Discuss US Use of Bases in Uruguay NOTE This Is another of fc 3fries ot written by IV Earl Hall Mason Cily minafinr In Jhe course of a lour through South America as one ol party of 12 of the Endowment for International Peace NEAR 1000 AT ROTARY SESSION 120 Americans Feared Number 60 By W EARL HALL MONTEVIDEO URUGUAY i Political control of Uruguay for the time being is more or less a onefamily affair Alfredo Baldo imir president is the soninlaw Gabriel Terra the immediate past president More than that Baldomir in winning the presi dency had to beat his own cousin a rival candidate Under President Terra the preceding president a new con stitution was adopted by pleb iscite One of its provisions was that in the presidential cabinet there should he substantial representation for the minority party a principle enforced also with respect to the makeup of the congress To Father Terra this seemed an excellent idea but to President B a 1 d o mir the plan n actual operation has proved to be something ot a headache He is finding himself enormously un happy w i th a cabinet of ad visers contain ing three mem bers viol ently out of sym pathy with some of his primary objectives For the moment the warmest I issue before Uruguay has to do I with making available air and Lbases to the United States Bti a Lost When Liner Sinks FRENCH PAPERS EGYPTIAN BOAT SENT DOWN BY ENEMY ACTION Ambulance Drivers and Missionaries Missing After Leaving Brazil NEW YORK loss ot 323 lives including those of 120 Americans was feared Monday with word that the Egyptian pas senger liner Zamzam had been sunk duo to enemy action in the South Atlantic The old 8299 ton steamer carried 203 passengers and a crew of 120 when it sailed from New York March 20 for Alex a andria Egypt by way of Re cite Brazil and Capetown South Africa Of these 24 were young Ameri cans of prominent families who had volunteered as members ot the BritishAmerican ambulance corps to serve as ambulance driv ers with the British forces in the middle east and 36 were Ameri can missionaries of the Roman Catholic and Seventh Day Adven tist faiths bound for Africa New York maritime circles understood there had been 45 other Ameri cans aboard though this could not be definitely ascertained because po posali which incidentally is still liri a most tentative stage But Luis f Alberto Herrera head of the op Iposmg faction known as Herrev istas is making the welkin rim in protest The United Stales Scnor Henera charges is trying lo con vert our river Plate into another I Caribbean I say South America for South Americans X H While Herrera is not going so far as supporting the nazi cause in the war the average Uru suayan reasons in his own mind that Herrera would be a logical person for leadership in the event of a German victory President Baldomir is contend Ihig that the constitutional pro vision for a cabinet divided against him or any other presi adont is wholly intolerable There tore in connection with the next lection he will rest his political utme on a plebiscite calling for i rescinding of the constitutional which had his father nIaws approval v fe 5s osed to BaktormVs election to ucceecl him and before he bc ame inactive throuah illness he p 10 cd many of the Batriomir olicics He hnrl become known ss ic strong man of Uruguay housjh a close personal friend of Mussolini it is not be eped that he subscribed to to alitarian ideals Between 1830 when Uruguay was established as an independ ent nation and 1900 her buifer role made her the battle ground for one war after aii ylher In fact it was almost Continuous warfare In one of the loss of ablebodied was so enormous hat the liopulation for several decades vas cut down Since 1900 however when he ivernment fell into Ihc hands ot en with the true democratic eal progress toward developing c land resources of the little ition has been nothing short of icctscular With that develop cnt has come a great insurgc ot J imigrants most of them plod jng peaceloving farmminded eople from kind who Mussolinis warlike aims ynolly repellent J Another accompaniment of this fwth in population and rc Jrces has been a socialminded vernment There has been a ncere and continuing endeavor i protect and make secure the iuer classes in city and on farm fid possible to raise their eco status Several of the meas fes identified with our own new pal are old stuff in Uruguay 1 How well these laws are work jg out depends quite largely on inere you rnakc inquiry I myself fnvever will leave Uruguay with lie feeling mat there is probably bDieacl between the poorcn id the richest than we have I up to now in South Amcr 3 i a The ambii lance corps indicated that it had no hope for its members This is a terrible blow said William V C Kuxton president of the corps if if if Sketchy and fragmentary re ports seemed to leave no doubt that the ship had been lost There was no word of thefate of her passengers and crew which comprised 110 Egyptians and 10 British officers includ ing Captain William G r a y Smith her master f A brief dispatch came through the censorship from London that some members at least of the party of American ambulance drivers had been lost and that the ship was sunk by enemy ac tion in the South Atlantic The BritishAmerican lance corps announced that the ship haj reached Recife safely had sailed from there soon after April 10 bound for Capetown and never had reached Capetown where it had been due April 21 The insurance underwriters it said had made an effort to locate the ship or survivors without avail We believed we had taken every possible safeguard for the protection of these men Rnxton said They were in transit to Mombassa chief port of Kenya LOOK INSIDE FOR DUKE OF SPOIETO Italian to Be Crowned New King of Croatia PAGE 2 Bancroft Creamery Destroyed by Fire STATE PAGE British East African colony 1 where they were to travel over land to the Lake Shad region to be billeted with the Free French forces of Gen Charles de Gaulle The Zamzam was a neutral ship It was carrying nonbelligerent iffiIesT here felt t here was a possibility that all the pas sengers and the crew were aboard a German raiding cruiser either a converted merchant ship or a cruiser The ship apparently dis New Argentine Envoy in U S RuizGuinazu and Hull Dr E n r i q u e RuizGuinazu left new foreign minister ot Argentina is greeted by Secre tary of Slate Cordei Hall on his arrival in Washington for a fiveday stay during which it is believed here will be discus sions with President Roosevelt and ptlicr officials on inter American defense and economic PHILLIP FAVERSHA5I missing appeared without a trace and this they said indicated the work of a surface raider If it had been tor pedoed by n submarine there would have been survivors in life jonts and some of them in al probability would have been picked up by this time they be lieved The youiiE American ambu lance drivers included Philip X Favcrsham 33 son of the fa mous actor William Faverslum who before he volunteered was an aelor who had appeared with Cornelius Otis Skinner and Clif ton Webb Michael Kirchwev Clark 21 a Harvard student ivliosc mother Frieda Kirch ivey is editor of The Nation and an ardent advocate of all out aid including convoys for Brit ain and whose father is Evans Clark head of the Twentieth Century fund The name of Arthur Kirdn Ir 26 of South Ken Conn on lhe list of the missing recalled a poignant moment when the ship cleared New York amid the cheers of well wishers Kircla had eloped three days before to Gordonsvillc va vilh Miss Georgette de Vil ame Westport Conn who laughing through her tears said to reporters Tm prepared to be a URGE F R BE WAR MEDIATOR Partly Nazi Dominated Press Says U S Could Virtually Dictate Terms VICHV France UPI Paris newspapers dominated and part Jy owned by Germany have start ed a concerted campaign to try to inauce President Roosevelt to mediate in the war They said that as a result of the Balkan and Libyan campaigns ireiich observers were convinced that neither the axis nor Britain was strong enough to strike a de cisivc blow now and that Mr Roosevelt had the choice of ar ranging a peace by compromise or taking the United States into the war either wilfully or as the result of convoys With the new strength resull itie from her switchover to war production the United States virtually could dictate peace terms between the axis nations and Britain the newspapers said They said thai if Mr Roosevelt wanted to mediate France would throw whatever influence she had behind himbut that if Mr Boose veltdecidedtoback Britain in an attempt to wear down the axfe nations in a long war France would fulfill her pledge to col laborate with Germany hi agri cultural and industrial matters French observers believe that if there is no mediation the axis powers will make a spirited drive against Gibraltav and Suez in the next six months and that bv the end of 1941 they will have cap tured both driving the British fleet from the Mediterranean and enabling Germany and Italy to develop the agricultural and min eral resources of nonBritish Af rica and transport the products safeb to JEuvope As an economic collaborator ofthe axis nations it was said France may or without German prompting try to re conquer the Congo Chad and other African colonies lost lo Gen Charles de Gaulles free French forces With the de Gaullists controling Chad ex ploitation of tlie Niger valley by France and Germany is not feasible it was pointed out The campaign for President Roosevelts intervention did not soften the antiAmerican tone of the press of occupied France Jacques Doriol Marcel Deal and other anti democratic writer continued to denounce President Roosevelts foreign policy Could Recognize de Gaulles Forces WASHINGTON United States was understood in informed diplomatic circles Mon day to be prepared to recognize Gen Charles de Gaulle head of the free French forces in Lon don in event of a complete break in American diplomatic relations with Vichy Responsible officials do not an ticipate such a break But axis use of French Syrian bases indicated to some that anti British elements in Uie cabinet of Marsha Henri Philippe Petain arc still m the ascendancy If French imval and air bases in Africa also should become available for Ger man use it would be regarded here as a direct threat to this hcmi spheie 1ster A Hoyal West Uberlv sessions here the 132nd district of Kotar A lhc riffht nr thc and spoke al both MARTIN URGES THEMTOLAUGH LOVE AND LIVE Annual Banquet at Roosevelt Fieldhouse Monday Evening SKE 1AGES 2 11 Rotarians here for tlie an nual conference of tlie 132nd district of Rotary Inter iiilional began to talk Mon day noon of rjjisshiff the 1000 mark in registered attend ance The total at noon was 832 grown id luring the forenoon i The annual baiuiucL and governors ball at the Roose velt iieldhouse Monday eve ning was expected to bring attendance to a peak An ad dress by Edward iU Conant Minneapolis past governor of district 117 and honoring of the Mason City and other clubs celebrating their silver anniversary were features of the program i AMES JPE H Richardson 60 since 1916 official Iowa Stale college photographer and head of thcollege photographic labora tories died of a heart attack Weather Report FORECAST IOWA Cloudy occasional show ers and thunderstorms Tuesday and in west and central Mon day night slightly warmer cast nnd central Monday night cooler west Tuesday and in cast by Tuesday night MINNESOTA Cloudy occasional showers and scattered thunder storms Monday night and in east and south Tuesday cooler north and extreme west Mon day night cooler Tuesday ex cept extreme northwest MASON CITY Cloudy occasional showers and thunderstorms Monday night nnd Tuesday Slightly warmer Monday night Cooler Tuesday IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics Maximum Sunday Minimum Sunday night At 8 a m Monday YEAR AGO Maximum Minimum Precipitation The figures for Sunday Maximum Saturday Minimum in night At 8 a m Sunday si 33 66 4s 74 53 64 The Big Men of Rotary Internafional are shown above discussing prajr 5 Big Railroad Unions Seek 30 Per Cent Boost CHICAGO Representa tives of the rive big railroad operating unions representing 350000 workers announced they had decided to launch n concerted national campaign for a 30 pet cent increase in all basic rates of pay Following a conference which began last Friday they an nounced they would demand vage increases which would amount to not less than a day Their demands will be served on the railroads June 10 pursuant to provisions of the national rail way mediation board Unions represented at the con ference were the Brotherhoods ot Locomotive Engineers Locomo tive Firemen nnd Engine Men and Railroad Trainmen the Switchmens union and the Order of Railway Conductors of Ameri ca AFL Makes Threat to Break Frisco Shipyard Picket Line in the decisio i the picket lines John j national head or tlie Trades unions said AUIS 1 flnn ivu uj Striking AFL and CIO machin wovkcrs would return its of II San I work regardless of anything that Governor Olson to Appeal to Workers to Return to Vital Jobs By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Sinking AFL and CIO machin ists of II San Francisco Bav area of anything shipyards faced Monday a threat PI nt tlle of the by AFL unions to break the pickcnmisls aml lllc governor et lines unless the walkout ended i T The Bay Cities Metal Trades I Hard foa council voted Sunday to send 15i 000 workers past the pickets Rpt production on S500 000 000 IvCltv of defense orders Action was J D ferred however until after a l UeSUay FaV J J William W Illurtin governor of the district St Louis Mo tola the larse crowd at the noonday luncheon to laugh love and live in order lo really enjoy life There is a lot oC foolish think ing going OH in the world today Mr Martin said in opening his talk There would have to be for us to be doing some of the things we arc doing today But he told his audience serv ice is he road to happiness A simple formula to get the most out of living is to learn to laugh to love and to live Some people car ry the weight of the world on their shoulder They worry a lot when the thing they should be doing is laughing Mr Martin did his bit toward helping the assembled Rotarians keep on the laughing side oE life by constantly telling stories that kepi the assemblage in an uproar It takes courage to gi through life the speaker said and laughing helps a lot U has been said that the nation that can laugh is the sanest Moving into the second phase oC his address the St Louis man said Rotary teaches us to love There is nothing finer than the friendships in a d c in Rotary Friendship is onn ol the greatest things in life Rotary gives marvelous opportunity for the friendship that all of us need f Rotary also icacbcs us n live Mr Martin continued It has been said that there arc two kinds of people in the ivorlcl the lifters and the leancrs To lie north something in your youve sot to br 1 lifter and thats what Kolary liraclies you Give me a man who laughs and Keeps his courage Ode that goes out and makes friends for the betterment of the community and one who tloes his share of the lift ing and Ill give you a man who lives breach his Martin inter Cf thc sood Rotay lub Metal thc haPPness his other r1 tuis club brought a i legless boy by giving him a pair of 1J i artificial legs And he also told L JO tiiat 1 dim iwu in the happiness an individual can experience by using the instance oE j a man who found great satisfaction m helping support a widowed mother of three children ending the advice laugh love and i lilt and youll reaily live meeting Tuesday night at which ov Culbert L Olson will appeal By THE ASSOCIATED FKESS Operators of hard coal mini I Mr Martins talk pretcrierf oy thc introduction ol four mem jber of Rotary from outside tho i United States They were tional defense The AFL machinist union a UI1IUII it member ot the council was not represented at the meeting which on a new vage contract Monday Ins of Ecuador lo ncrease pay of about 100000 j Cosa Rica anthracite miners who wovn rr ivc anthracite dercd to resume j Icci Vast throngs turned rallies into spirited patriotic demonstrations Sunday as the nation held its first I am an American day The meetings intended lo arouse in naturalized Americans awareness of what it means to be citizens of this nation were held throughout the country in response to a presidential proclamation te Actor Edward Arnold pres ident ot the I am an American servances in 3500 cities At New Yorks Central park rally alone the police estimate of attendance was 675000 and Chief Inspector Louis F Cosluma said he believed it was the largest crowd which ever attended a pat riotic gathering in the TJnited Stales At Chicagos Soldier field the attendance was estimated at 100000 by Otto K Jclincfc park High government officials by radio or in person at the rallies plied upon naturalized and native alike to make what ever sacrifices necessary to keep democracy strong in this nation Secretary Ickes told the roaring New York crowd that here in America we have something so worthwhile living for that it is worth dying for He also asserted Am an AmericanDay that the United States must give Great Britain everything needed to beat the life out of our common enemy In Washington Vice group meetings uere schcd i tvuiv i vv for Monday afternoon with following discussion leaders i Club service Guy Van Derveer I Father Lcs Entringer Grundy Center A f Piper Em metsburg L G Chrysler Grin Jack Logan Waterloo the American ideal and do not di Jac rectly give comfort to thc Hitler Vocational service Father C idea of racial superiority which is Burnett Whitchead Mason Citv so utterly ODDosori in u n service Father C n is I Durneu Whitchead Mason Citv ca s nHy Yhat AmcriH O Bernbrock Waterloo C A f at a MolTis Waterloo and Henry Mer aram of thc National Krinmtinr I cer Ottumwa wer Prcsident 1 association in thanking God for Arica house added We like the Germans in Ameri ca provided only that they accept remain free xs long as its citizens were willing to make thc sacri fices thai arc necessary Community service 1 V Miller Hurnboldt Orlando Kreider Iowa rails Kenneth E Billings Indian ola and LeRoy Spencer Iowa City Boys work Otto Van Krog fcldora Dr 1 c Powers Hamp ton Ray Cunningham Ames Ray   

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