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Mason City Globe Gazette: Monday, April 14, 1941 - Page 1

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - April 14, 1941, Mason City, Iowa                             NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME THE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWAHS NEIGHBORS MASON CITY IOWAMONDAY MASON CITY BRIGHT SPOT THIS PAPEll CONSISTS gPTWO SECTIONS SECTION ONE 15g BTOLRIIHjETO NEW GREEK LINE rni th id rath The eeia1 ic J ic at nf Dry Coast Areas Are Productive EDITORS NOTE Tins is another of a series of articles written by IV Earl Halt Mason City GlobeGazette managing editor in the course of a tour through South America as one of a party of 12 guests of the Carnegie Endowment for In ternational Peace NUMBER 30 By W EARL HALL THE LUCIA A question that has been coming back again and again to me as we have sailed down past thousands miles of sandy shoreline on the west coast of South America W h y did the Spaniards chose such a territory for their seat of c i v j j 2 a lion when by going inland a hundred miles or so they could have found ample moisture a n d fertile land W EARL HALL The answer of course is that the Spaniards who colonized South America were not agricul turists They were seafarers and they were in quest of precious metals And the totally barren mountains skirting the sea through most of the length of South Americas Pacific coast were rich cs wer in those metals especially silver and copper gold That explains the Spaniards But what of the South American Indians before them Why did tncy build their principal settle ments on these same barren wastes Here the explanation is cniite different Those Indians WERE agriculturists from thc moun tain valleys and the plains in land from thc mountains They came down to thc sea by de Krccs in auest of the equable chmaie produced by tlic Hum boldl current They discovered hat the mere application of water to the un likely appearing soil of the coastal sands made it enormously pro more productive jsoil of the inland So down from the Oldest Iowa Civil WaTVeteran Dies Oldest Veteran Dies 4 Lose Lives MfKPflUf UAH C VALUE OF NEW JAPANESE PACT Stalin Sees Matsuoka Leave After Signing of Important Document 6y V S thc In WHIPPLE LAST GAR MEMBER INCERROGORDO Full Military Rites Planned for Funeral Services on Wednesday Rockley Whipple 101 sole sur vivor of the Grand Armv of the Republic in Cerro Gordo county and the oldest Civil war veteran in the stale of towa passed away oa r 1 y Monday morning at home at 128 Virginia avenue southeast in Mason City For more than 60 years be marched side by side with his comrades from he Union army in Memorial day parades in Mason City and watched tiic ranks diminish one by one un til he was the last to answer the call to the colors When Capt Charles C Ham ilton of Ames died last Tuesday morning the local centenarian be came the oldest living veteran of the Civil war in the state but that distinction proved short Wednesday afternoon at the Elmwood cemetery a bugle will sound the long clear notes of taps and riflemen of later wars stand Turn to Page II For other pictures ot Rockley Whipple and the story of thc last of the once powerful Grand Army of the Republic in Mason City ing stiffly at attention in their uniforms will loose a sharp volley into the spring air a salute and tribute to the grand old man of Cerro Gordo countys veterans These full military rites will be accorded Rockley Whipple by the American Legion and the Veterans of Foreign Wars The Civil war veteran wax an hon orary member of local posts of both organizations The Rev William Galbrelh will IMUVU m norm be ni charge of the funeral serCl Norway and destroyed harbor vice itself which will be held at wovks and German militarv ob ROCKLEY WHIPPLE BRITISH RAID NORTH NORWAY BULLETIN UR The official JJAK news agency reported Monday night that a British destroyer raided a village north of Tronisoc in far northern Norway Saturday night Washingtons Famous Japanese Cherry Trees Now in Full Bloom WASHINGTON cap itals famous Japanese cherry blossoms along thc Potomac iiver were in full bloom Monday for a throng of tourists estimated by police at a quarter of a million 4 Lose Lives in Battles During Break OSSJNJNG N Y lnVfwo longterm convicts who shot their way out of the Sing Sing infirm ary in a sensational break which cost four lives were captured a lew hours later Monday in the woods across the Hudson river The wo grayclad convicts still armed with smuggled guns with which they and a eunled crate who was later slain had broken from the prison in a battle in which a prison guard and an OssiiiinB policeman were killed and a convict pa tient died of shock were cap uered on the slope or Mount Hood in 1alisailcs Interstate parli Patrolman William Mullen an experienced woodsman member of the park s police and one of peace officers trailing lushed them from underoiu h within a mile of the shore point llad cci The prisoners who comm dcered a boat and sought to cape m the woods on the Roekland thiM y ide Ulc after a uinci convict had been killed hi a sun fight were Joseph Riordan and Charles McGale sent j thcil hrcaksbori 1 Kiordan and TEXT PAGE MOSCOW MFor the first e since the bolshevik revolu n 24 years ago soviet Russia and Japan were bound together Monday in a neutrality pac garded by observers here as Apartments Destroyed ern Norway and fliirmri 1 Pit iir the First Methodist church P m The body will lie in state at thc McAuley and Son funeral chapel Monday and at the home Tuesday and until a m Wednesday From then until the time of the service an honor guard will watch over it at the church Mr Whipple had been in ex cellent health most of his life although he had recently suffered a lingerins illness and was bed fast for tho past two weeks He lived most of his life in the w iJ Lieu Jill U lit V OG jectives in a daring sea raid dis patches from Oslo reported earlv Monday A British torpedo boat was said to have attacked an unidentified harbor 01 northern Norway Satur day after which troops were land ed and harbor works destroyed antinazi volunteers aided in the attack ihe Oslo re ports said An official German communi que was quoted as saying that the wife of a local leader of the Nas jonal Samling the Quislingist Norwegian nazi party was killed by machine gun fire during attack the Likewise they didnt have to rjro tccl themselves eitherex treme cold or extreme heal So much for the weather and ihe climate of the past Ill turn now lo a more contemporary con nf il l 7 01 liie same general sideration subjects for lllis of n o laOOO or 20000 miles kept won dering what my wardrobe should oe I had m mind my approach and crossing of the equator where u is always warm and usually huimdly hot Also I had in mind my projected flight across the Andes Then too I was leavin America in ypically winter wcatncr As we pulled out of harbor that city was at the ocginning of one of js most severe snowstorms in years ac cording to report later received on shipboard V All factors considered I dc ciucd on a preponderance of tropical weave clothing wjth just enough regular weight garb to tide me over the cold weather from Iowa to New York and for use on the Andean flight where I8 slali altain a altitude of 20000 feet or so Thus far that decision seems to Iiave been rather fortunate Our first 60 hours at sea were extremely rough with snow turn ing o ram as proceeded south Ail movable furnishings on ship board had to be lashed down and there a heavy breakage of As ue approached Cuba and 2 rtii f aini survived by his wife a daughter Mrs Jess Dunbar of Mason Citv two sons Ray of Rockwell and Willis Mason City 14 grand children several great grandchil dren and other relatives His daughter Ida died in 1935 at Roundup Mont It was in 1875 tiiat Mr Whipple came to Mason City He became a charter member of the Elks lodge No 310 here When he came to Cerro Gordo county he owned a team of tiorses a covered wagon S3 and a doz He farmed in Portland tounsiiip for 18 years When he was a year and a half old he moved from Medina lo teffcr son with his parents Thc trip was made in company with uve other families all travcl ff by ov carls At Ihe beginning of thc Civil war he was 3 years old and cn hsted in the Fourth Wisconsin cavalry Company E He was mus tered in and mustered out at Madison Wis and served chiefly around Baton Rouge and Fort Hudson as a scout He Wis one of the dispatch car uers when General Banks was defeated in the Battle of Red LOOK INSIDE FOR by Blaze in Waterloo WATERLOO along by a high wind fire destroyed the Winder apartments on Waterloos west city limits early Sunday with a damage estimated nt 53000 Fifteen occupants of seven apartments were forced to fiee their homes A fourstall burned also Cause oC the blaze was undetermined low 90s which in combination a marked humidity gave us our most uncomfortable day At the equator the temperature was m the high BOs with hu piidty high soon we were definitely in in Barranqullla Co iSrnbh placing Prominent Stock Buyer 111 4 Months Dies PAGE 2 Iowa Traffic Mishap Toll Rises to 134 STATE PAGE Cagey Managers Open 1941 Baseball Season SPORTS PACE Council Has Options on Airport Site PAGE 7 BACK OX JOBS DETROIT vanguard of approximately 20000 workers moved into the Ford Motor com pany Kouge plant in suburban Dearborn Monday to resume pro duction after settlement Friday of the United Automobile Workers CIO strike Weather Report FORECAST MASON CITY Mosllv cloudy oc casional showers and thunder storms a n d cooler Monday night Fresh lo strong south west winds shifting to north west and diminishing Monday night Tuesday partly cloudy IOWA Mostly cloudy occasional showers and thunderstorms cast and central Monday night Tuesday partly cloudy cooler Monday night and cast and central Tuesday fresh to mod erately southwest winds shifting to northwct and climin ihing Momiiy MINNESOTA Cloudy Mor riay night and Tuesday strong shifting winds becoming north and northwest Monday night and diminishing Tuesday IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics Maximum Sunday 7n Minimum Sunday night 57 At 8 a in Monday f2 Rain ig The mercury climbed to 79 highest this season on Easter Sundaj A shower accompanied by thunder in thc late afternoon made lawns turn a bright green YEAR AGO Maximum Minimum Thc figures for Sunday Maximum Saturday Minimum in night At 8 a m Sunday I ln r John Hartyc and an Ossinjnj Policeman James Fasan Their companion in the sensational cs kTi Iom WatcrB30 illctl in the item which Fa ean was shot to death McGale Waters had shot their way out of the prison hospital where one was an inmate attendant and the other patients feigning illness After killing Hartye and locking up another guard and a nurse they fled through a narrow serv ice tunnel which runs from the hospital basement to a railway gorge beyond Ihe 115 year old prisons walls Fleeing through dcy icouritered Fagan and Patrolman Ulinm fcelson Fagan was killed but Nelson shot and killed a Manhattan robber serving 15 to n i ui II1C holdup of Ihe Consolidat ed Edison company in New York two years ago While Nelson ran to telephone for help aicGale amf Kiordan fled to the river bank ami forced Charles Kolir to row lliem across to the vest side Ossming police prison guards and slate troopers were im mediately rushed across the stream in pursuit Evidence indicated that the escape first major break since Warden 1C Lawcs took charge of the prison in 1920 ivs effected wilh inside belli and had been lony and carefully planned DENY OH STRUCK FARRAGUT Iowa Drill ers sinking a teat oil well on th James Wisnom farm three miles e mes southwest of here Monday denied pact re as the most important diplomatic stroke since the MoscowBerlin accord of 19i9 which preceded the Ger man march into Poland The Easter Sunday acionl which pledges each nation to remain neutral in the event Ihe other is made the object of hostilities on hepart of one several third powers was the main prize of Japanese Iorciffn minister Yosnke Mat snokas tlucc week European tour to Moscow Berlin and Home Matsuoka left for Tokio only a short time after signing the pact Joseph Stalin saw him off the first time Stalin ever has been known to pay such a tribute to a visiting statesman The treaty valid for five year Pledges the two powers to respect each others territorial intcKrity and b J 11 was accompanied by a dec laration specifying that Japan would respect the borders of thc Russiandominated outer Mon golian peoples republic and fhn soviet would do the same fof Japanesc sponsored Manchoukuo The neutrality pact and dec laration published today said J ravda the community parly or gan are documents of vast po litical significance since they con stitute an important step for the improvement of relations between the U H S R and Japan whose governments arc guided in this case by a desire to strengthen peaceful and friendly relations between Ihe two countries Pravdas statement was made in an editorial circulated by Tass official Russian news agency H said the declaration puts an end to all petty frontier conflicts of the tvo Thc importance of the neu trality pact is all the greater I ravda continued since it was siffiied at a moment when a sec ond imperialist war continues spreading and involves more countries At such a moment normaliza tion and improvement of rela tions between Ihe U S S R and Japan is a very important step in me cause of peace and fully con forms to the soviet unions policv of peaceful relations with all it neighbors and countries See Treaty as First Break in 3 Power Pact By 1 W T MASON United Press War Expert The new RussoJapanese neu trality treaty represents the first bi tak in ho triple alliance Hitler doubtless knew in advance ihat Japan in tended to lake this way of es cape from the full c u m m i t ments of the triplicc But he could do nolh now MASON ing to change the determina tion of the To kio government Stalin can point a l t h c fuehrer without fearinga stab in the back Hitler does not know when or whether the gun will go off but he must hold 1000000 men in readiness and he mav be expected to become more cautious about further exciting the bear II is significant that a the agreement with Japan was bein lormuliled Stalin made public his criticism of Hungarys invasion of Jugoslavia In lolling Hungary she might be torn to bits Stalin was infcrcntially warning Germany being strengthened inthis position by thc removal of Japan as Ger manys confederate Thc IIRIV pact is not a full nonaggression agreement since it does not end Russian ajj t0 Cjiina which has a procommu nist aggressive aiiliJapancsc purpose By increasing aid to Chiamr KaiShek Itiissia might cause Japan to limit dispersal of many troops beyond thc Chinese combat area Although the neutrality treaty provides for Russian recognition of Manchukuo andJapanese rec ognition of thc Mongolian peoples republic nothing is said about contiguous Mongol lerritory where both countries have rival inter ests That reason coupled with natural hesitancies which are characteristic of Japanese psy chology should be sufficient to cause a policy of caution in de nuding Maiicliuktio of Japanese troops for use elsewhere A Pacific ocean conflict would be essentially a war of sea power and blockade Thus now as be fore Japan will certainly judge thc consequences to herself by naval and blockade measure ments These primary factors inve not been changed bv Sun days exchange of documents nt Moscow KKIOKTED MISSING CHEYENNE Wyo M boys and two men were unre portcd in te rugged Granite can yon region west of Cheyenne Mon blustery Easlc rumors they had struck oil Americas attitude toward thc war in Europe certainly will not be altered by the new treaty The United States has nut based its possible actions in the future on thc course of events in Rus sia It would be foolish for Tokio or Berlin to believe that Ameri can policy can bn controlled influenced by Slalin Germany however is in a fiif ercnt position A strengthened ussian policy in ilic Balkans Iol scnous difficulties There is as much disproportion in Japans agreement to help Ger many against America under thc triple alliance as there was in Ja pans pledge o help Germany against Russia Japan could be of some assistance to Germany but not Germany to Japan if America became i belligerent ROME ASSERTS KORITZA TAKEN ON WEST FRONT British Declare Stiff German Attack on Tobruk Beaten Off IUOM CABLE UElOUTS British troops have withdrawn to iieupositions along the Greek Ironl London admitted Monday night and Rome claimed capture of strategic Koritza which may open a route for flanking the GrecoBritish main defenses London was vagueas to the point at which the withdrawal of Lntish troops in Greece had oc curred but mention of pressure on the eastern flank southwest Salonika may indicate the region of retirement This report anil thc Italian claim fo the recapture of Koritjia may indicate that thc Grccii iinlish allies shortly will forced to fall back upon a short secondary defense line from lommia to Iarisa a possibly more defensible front In mid Greece Creel frontline dispatches previously had asserted that Hit lers panzer columns had failed in hen drive against stiffening BritishGreek defenses and an KAlcommunique said British Planes were violently strafing nazi troop columns driving into the Aegean kingdom The British also had announced earlier that they had routeda select German division London indicated that the situa tion m nazi panzer divisions are developing a serious thrtisi toward thc canal had not deteriorated appreciably during ihe day Thc British were said lo have beaten off a stiff German attack tipon Tobruk in which tanks and infantry were employed Men lion of infantry however indi cated that thc Germans were fol lowing up their fast moving ar mored columns with rapid trans port of infantry fighting units lo the combat scene And around Sollum ture of winch the cap 52 29 77 in fii YKAK AGO j Maximum i Minimum Faus Into Nazi Hanch was claimed by British said that con tact was established by advanced elements on each side and losses inflicted on thc Germans The axis claimed the British were attempting to evacuate men from Tobruk by sea and said that a British lank attempt lo break the German ringof steel armmcl the Libyan port had failed The Italian claim of the reoccn iiation of Koritza appeared to be the most serious news of thc day from the Greek front Korilza lies just over the Al lanian border from Greece and was the scene of a real Greek victory agains tinItalians A miles away almost due south An axis dnvo along this road quickly would make the Phlorina end of the PhkirinaGianitsa line untenable However the British announcement of a withdrawal strongly hinted that this northern defense system already may be in process of abandonment Another road from Korilza leads south and slightly east to loiinninn western anchor of a tcntalivc secondary AngloGreek defense line Tinoccupation nt indicate that Italian and German troops after effectinga mnrliire ul Lake Oriirida drove soiilhwanl swiftly between that lake anil Lake Ircsua as had hicn a likely possibility the moment the jimclnrc at Ochrid i was achieved Tins sector had been held stub bornly by Greek troops against the Italians but the Greeks may have been forced to retreat south ward due to the danger of their rear communications being cut by German panzer troops which sliced through Bitolj pass a little to the east and south their positions in Albania Mud and snow were said to have impeded thc nazi thrust against the aUied front stretch ing from Albanian mountain passes to theGulf of Salonika Simultaneously Jugoslav armies were reported lo have caplurcd Durazio on thc Adri atic sea which British term thc major escape port of Italian troops fighting in Albania fascist reports acknowledged mat the Jugoslavs were making   

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