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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: January 25, 1941 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - January 25, 1941, Mason City, Iowa                             NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME HOME EDITION VOL XLVII ASSOCIATED PRESS AND UNITED PRESS FUIX LEASED WIRES THE NEWSPAPER THAT ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS MASON CITY IOWA SATURDAY JANUARY 25 1941 MASON CITY THE BRIGHT SPOT IIOS PAPER CONSISTS OF TWO SECTIONS SECTION ONE NO 91 BRITISH FORCES MARCH INTO DERNA Bullitt Denies FORMERFRENCH ENVOY BLAMES HITLER AGENTS Tells Committeemen Hemisphere Invasion Certain If Axis Wins WASHINGTON a William C Bullitt former ambassador to France declared Saturday that the German propaganda ma was responsible for reports that he had made statements abroad that the United States would come into he war He made that statement before the house foreign affairs commit tee xvhile testifying in support of the administrations aidBritain bill In so testifying Bullitt said that invasion of the western hemisphere would be almost certain if ihe British navy were destroyed and a totali tarian power gain control of either the Atlantic or Pacific before the United States two ocean fieet is ready Later in response to questions by Representative Rogers R the witness said that he had always been of the opinion that the United States would stay out of this war if it possibly could and I so informed every prime minister of France while 1 was ambassador Chairman Bloom DNY inter rupted and said that as long as tioni the former ambassador at liberty to take all trie time he needed and go to any length he desired to give the country the facts Bullitt said the story that he had led France to count on United States entry into the war was invented as xve all knoiv by the German propa ganda machine and spread by it and by dupes He said he would be glad if every dispatch communication or telegram that lie had sent to the state department xvhile he was in Paris couM be published tomorrow morning Senator Wheeler D Mont recently demanded that the state department give congress access to the files of messages sent by both Bullitt and Joseph P Ken nedy ambassador to Great Brh ain in the period before the two countries went to war xvith Ger many Bullitt himself made public this copy of a letter he said was xvrit ten to President Roosevelt last April 4 by Edouard Daladier I liaxa just read the allegations of the government on the sub ject ot the pretended declaration of Ambassador Bullitt X Xn one can foresee to what limits German propaganda will carry its lies Also I feel I should tell you that during the past tiro years I was prime min ister Ambasfidor Bullitt always said to me tlat in case of a Eu ropean cocrict France should make her decisions knowing that according to the opinion of Ambassador Bullitt the United Slates would not enter the war x x x V After giving his support to the aidBritain legislation Bullitt was questioned by committeemen about lessons could be learned by the United States from the fall of Franco I think there is a likeness be twccn France and us that is cx traordinary replied the wit ness neatlyclad in a dark blue suit The slate of mind of this coun try is almost exactly that which prevailed in France a year before the state of war with Germany They had the same confidence in the Maginol line that many in the United States haxc in the At lantic ocean They just did not think it could be attacked success fully and there was no sense of urgency in their preparations that there should have been They did a good job in pre paring just as we are doing to day but there was no sense of urgency They never got it Responding to other questions Bullitt told the committee that he was convinced that if the British with the hcp of Ameri can plane production attains dominance over Germany in the air British bombing would bring about a collapse behind the Ger man lines This he said would WILLIAM G BUUUTT Aid to Britain insure a British victory xvitbout the aid of American manpoxver Picturing the German people as suffering greatly under xvar time prixatipn and 30000000 German Catholics who xvhile they have to keep their mouths shut noxv hate the xvhole German regime Bullitt declared he did not believe the German people xvould stand up under bombing as the British have After all he added the Brit ish are basing their resistance on all the things that ate good in life Describing xvhat he said xvould be the drastic consequences to Ihe United States if Britain were defeated Bullitt asserted before the house foreign affairs com mittee at a croxvded hearing on the administrations aidtoBrit ain bill that the most certain way to Insure against such a de feat would be for thiscountry to goto Avar He prefaced this hoxvever with a declaration that xve are determined not to be draxvn into this war Declaring flatly tliat the United States is not prepared today to meet an attack Bullitt said we must buy time in xvhich to pre pare We can buy that time only by making certain he added that the British fleet will continue to hold the totalitarian forces in Eu rope while our fleet xvatches in the Pacific In a g point stalement to the committee the former ambas sador asserted that our coun try is in such danger today that decisions on the effective use of our instruments of defense are as vital as if we had already been attacked Bill 1776 the British aid leg islation is designed to empoxver the president to make those deci sions Bullitt said By passing it the congress xvould shoxv 1 be lieve that the xvJsdom of the frarn ers ot our constitution is still alive in our land and thai xve like our forefathers xvill submit to no master but God At the start of his statement Uullitl declared this country was determined lo maintain the inde pendence of Ihe United Stales and Rovcrnmcnl of Ihc people by Ihc people and for the peo ple We hate xvar he continued Therefore xve desire lo protect our country and our liberties xvithout going lo xvar Telling the commiltee that Ger many had draxvn both Italy and Japan Into a league directed against us and other free na tions Bullitt asserted that xve cannot appease Germany It is impossible lo appease the unappeasable the carc fnlly dressed former ambas sador said And the xveslcrn hemisphere is the juiciest mor sel before the dictators While the Atlantic and Pacific oceans remain obstacles to in vasion ot he Americas he xvit ncss said that this country xvould not have a twoocean navy before Without the British navy could not protect both the Pa cific coast and the Atlantic coast of the western hemisphere he continued We could not lock both the front door and the back door oC our national home Declaring that strong totali tarian elements exist in many South American countries Bul litt asserted the movement of to talitarian control toxvard the Panama canal xvould be rapid in event of elimination of the British naxy and control of either the Atlantic or Pacific by a to talitarian fleet He added lhat the experience of cities in England had shoxvn that it xvould be impossible to prevent bombardment of the ca nal by planes based on the north ern portion of South America Central America or on aircrall carricfs M m Halifax Says Hitler Lost Wai Last June by Lapse in Attack England Was Then at Its Weakest British Ambassador Reports WASHINGTON UP Viscount Halifax the British ambassador reported after talking for more than an hour xvith Secretary Hull Saturday that xve see things veiy much alike The nexv ambassador xvho xvas paying his first formal eall al Hie slate deparlment after his precedent breaking reception Friday on Chesapeake hay by President Roosevelt talked briefly xvilh newspapermen after exchanging views with the stale deparlment head on internation al affairs President Roosevelts action in coming to meet meupon my ar rival on the battleship King George V Halifax said rxvill be deeply appreciated in England and throughout the empire xvhere Us significance be Discussing the xvar the nexv ambassador declared that in Ins opinion history comes to be xvritten Hiller will have been found to have lost the xxar in June 1940 when he failed lo take advantage of the situation existing after Ihc collapse of France The viscount said England xvas then at its xveakest and Germany have been able lo cash in if it had acted quickly The ambassador said he xvas looking forward to the opportun ity to see different parti of the United Stales and to see what you are doing and will be doing I hope to aid us Asked what he considered the most immediate needs Halifax said Mobilization of your great industrial strength and trans planting that into action in sup plying us vvitJi ships and sup plies we need It JF quite clear Halifax said that Hitler is making a desper ate effort to intensify the sea blockade of England That means a sexcre strain on our ships our naxy and our aircraft Help in meeting that strain is xital and the ciuicker you can give it to us the better The envoy said that since he had been a member of Britains xvar cabinet from the beginning of the remains a member of the feels that he can translate Britains feeling and so that they will be xvell understood in this country IVIakc no mistake about it Halifaxsaid England is in good heart When I xvalked through the strecls of London just before I left I xvas impressed with the fact that if the Germans thought they could upset the British people by bombing they had erred greatly Halifax added that there xvas no dnubt in England that spring xvould bring a great German at tack We have no illusions aboul Germanys strength or plans Halifax said but we knoxv they xvill not succeed Officials said that the ambassa dor had no other plans for his first day in Washington and might go to the white house on rtuucuu aim ouumea the xxork deiitials tn the secretary of state expects to do in this country before calling upon Uc president avc ramc here he sai CIO ORDERS MEN TO WORK Labor Dispute Ends at Bethlehem Steel Plant in Pennsylvania BETHLEHEM Pa lehem Steel company employes xvho xvalked oft the job Friday aft er a protest demonstration xvere ordered Saturday by the Steel Workers Organizing Committee to return to work Sunday Van A Bittner head of the SVTOCs drive to organize the companys workers issued the or der folloxving conferences xvith federal and state labor concilia tors Bitlner xvho estimated the number affected by the labor dispute al 1500 said he xvas sure the xvorkers would adhere lo the order At the same time hoxvevcr he pointed out that Fridays flarcup was spon taneous on the part of the work ers themselves and thai the union had not been consulted concerning the action The last thing xve is a strike Bittner said There are belter ways of getting xvhat xve want from Bethlehem so xve de eided it xcould be best all arounc lo order the men back to their posts Despite the order pickets still xvere massed at the plants gates although no attempts xvere made to interfere with workers report ing toduly The company anr nouriced rthat operations were nor mal and estimated that less than 300 men did not report for work Saturday DIES FROM BURNS FORT MADISON Cosario Medil Mo retired labor er died Friday night in Santa Fe hospital here of burns suffered more than txvo weeks ago xvhen his bed caught fire at his home The Weather FORECAST IOWA Snoxv moderate lo heavy at limes southeast Salur day night probably endingSun day morninfr colder Saturday night and cast and southcentral Sunday MINNESOTA Cloudy snoxv Sunday and south and xvcst Sat urday night colder extreme cast not so cold north central and extreme Saturday night rising temperature Sun day IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette xveather statistics Saturday Maximum Friday 25 Minimum in Night 21 At 8 a m Saturday 23 xvclcomed the ambassador and Lady Halifax at nightfall They had transferred from the warship lo the nearby yacht in small boats through fog and driving rain A conference between the chief cxecutixe and Halifax followed Then they and members of their I have come here he said as a member of the xvar cabinet serving his majestys ambassa dor lo make knoivn lo the gov ernment and people of thr 0 tlHilc lrtK United States from lime to time Keeping American munitions mov in wliil if tliev are xvill ing in everincreasing quantities ing they can be Halifax is fresh from he inner most councils of Londons war cabinet He xvill undertake for the British empire the task of best give its Ihe help xve need The more quickly your gen erous help can be made effectixe the sooner shall xve be able to break this nazi poxvcr that is Irv ing to cnslaxc Europe and the world Of the future he snid We have assuredly a rough difficult and perhaps a very long road before us but the British people are united as never before m history and I have no doubt that xvith your help xve shall win through and so save those causes on which your civilization and ours When the brief press conference broke up the presidential party and that of the ambassador went ashore to xvaiting automobiles The trip from Annapolis made through a driving rain started a j little after p m C S T i nnH miles below Annapolis Md Friat it ended here at the steps day afternoon There after a swift i of the rambling redbrick motor rp from Washington lo ish embassy where Ihc president Annapolis xvhere he boarded the I bade the new cnvov andlariv yacht Potomac Mr Roosevelt Halifax goodnight to Britains fighting forces Thai he xxas assured of full cooperation on Ihc part of Washington officialdom xvas ac cepted here as beyond question after President Roosevelt had extended an extraordinary gest ure of friendship by rcccixing him even before the tall spare Englishman had set fool on American shores The manner of meeting between the chief executive and Britains former foreign secretary in fact left xeterans in the art of diplo macy searching in vain for a pre cedent and capped in drama the envoys secret crossing of he sub marineinfested north Atlantic on one of Britains great nexv battle 35000 ton King George Aboard the dread naught Halifax arrived in Chesapeake bay six British Land Sinews of Might in Egypt rTkS CarS artillcry Pieces anl even a motor orpcdo boat lie on a dock in an port as Britwli unload supply ships These form the sinexvs of war for the army 111VfUc m Us campaign against Ihe Italians in north Africa Assoclaled Press photo from Paramount News LONG PLEADS NOTGUMY Cresco Man Charged With Slaying Wife to Be Tried Feb 24 CRESCO Long 42 pleaded Innicent Saturday to a first degree murder indictment brought against him Thursday by the Howard county grand jury for alleged xiife slaying District Judge T H Gcheen set his trial for Feb 24 Long is accused of slabbing and cutting his 25 year old wife fatal ly in their Cresco apartment Jan uary 2 when slie returned home from her job in a WPA sewing room The couple had quarreled over a bill of for txvo dresses for their four year old daughter Ar dith June Sheriff Percy Haven said Long signed a statement admitting the attack and declaring that he thought his xvife had paid for the dresses but when he faced her with the bill she admitted she saxed nut the money to finance a divorce US TROOPS AT NEWFOUNDLAND ST JOHNS Ncxvfoundland rP United States troop trans port Alexander hoxe to off this port Saturday loaded xvith the first United States troops lo man the Nexvfoundlahd defense base now tinder construction Stormy weather made it likely the Alex ander xxould delay her entrance into the harbor No cere m o n y is planned here to greet the troopship be yond the usual exchange visits of the United Stales commanding of ficer Colonel Maurice Welly and Governor Sir H T Walwyn A berth has been constructed for the Alexander on the south side of the Harbor The base which tlic United States troops will man here xvas a gift from Britain to the United States When construction is fin ished the area xxlll have an air base an army defense force site of 160 acres and a naval base of 22 acres including 1250 feet of wharfage Important Positions in Albania Wrested From Greeks Is Claim posi tions along the Albanian battle front were reported by the Italian high command Saturday to have been wrested from the Greeks Lo cation of the positions was not specified Preparations toBallcNazi Invasion Made By DEivm MACKENZIE Foreign JCexvs Analyst Britains sudden rush of prepar ations to get Ihe country set for a possible nazi attempt at inxasion this spring is an interesting if in direct Colonel Lindberghs testimony in Wash ington that he didnt believe Ger many could invade England un less the latter had suffered inter nal collapse Certainly many neutral ex perts hold the chances of a suc cessful invasion tiot to be bright unless Britain previously has lieeii bombed into insensibility However collapse or no col lapse Herr Hitler has given Plenty of indications that he in tends to make this risky gamble if he can fincTan opening and the Briions apparently believe him Only by knocking out England herself is Ihe fuehrer likely to the xvar Invasionminded London recognizing that if and xvhen this assault fomcs il will represent the crucial hour of the conflict is looking for the greatest military attack ever marie by any nation A disquieting aspect of this preparedness campaign is thej stress the government is laying on the provision of gas masks for civilians Manufacturers of masks are said lo have been asked to speed up their output I should say this represents wise precaution rather than def inite informalion that the Ger mans intend to employ gas Thus far bolli sides have studiously avoided this terrible chemical weapon either for humanitar ian reasons or because of fear of reprisals However each is fully prepared lo use it if the other slarts the game Tlir hor rors of drenching a great city xvith poison jtas need no devel opment in this column Probably neither side really cx pccls that gas be brought into play Still the fear undoubtedly exists that it might be resorted to as an act of desperation Colonel Lindbergh also said he didnt think it xvould be pos sible for England to inxade the continent and win the xvar He added I think it xvould be impossible that England and the United I Stales could invade the continent together unless an internal col lapse came It is precisely such a collapse xvilhin Germany that ihe British and their allies arc banking on As a matter of fact there is nothing very strange about that since one ralhcr expects xxars to be won by internal collapse probably coupled xvith military action Thats the way the World war xvas many other wars from the beginning of his 1 heard a famous British sol PASTEURIZING BILL PASSED Process Requires 46 Seconds New Method Believed Efficient DES lUOhVES A mill pasteurization process requiring only 4G seconds xvould be legal izetl under n bill passed in tin Iowa house Friday Iowa law now requires tha milk be pasteurized cither b holding milk at H5 degrees not less than 25 minutes or bj healing to 185 degrees for a short er period of time Marl Thompson secretary of agriculture who introduced the bill through Hie house efficiency committee said the nexv proces is just as efficient in killing un healthful bacteria as tlie slowe methods now required Advocate of the bill claim milk js more tasty when pasteurized by th new method and has a more dis tinct cream line dier say Ihe other day xvar be xvon as the result of the collapse of German civilian morale due to privation He xvas figuring on the efficiency of llc British naval blockade which long has had a stranglchold on the continent Colonel Lindbergh said he doubled lhat Germany could be starved into submission bv the blockade That remains to be seen of course but in this connection it is interesting to recall the re cent statement by the Washington department of agriculture re garding the effects of the block ade on Italy Said the report This blockade is so cffectixe m stopping the flow of supplies needed hy Italy that it has more severely disorganized lie Ital ian economic structure than Anything else the xvar has ac complished Italy isnt Germany hough i and if Colonel Lindberghs cnil mate is right then he allied I chances arc indeed slim Ever since the start of the war Brit ain has placed her main reliance on strangulation of the The colonels statement therefore must have been received ivith mixed emotions by the military experts of Britain Civilian morale is one of thoic things xvhich cannot be figured far in adxancc Theres a limit lo xxhal even the sturdiest morale can stand We saw that in the World xvar One day the Germans whipping the xvorld and a fexv xveeks later morale behind the lines snapped like a clay pine stem That can happen to the bravest of people The recognize this equally xvith the British as wiU ness Ihc terrific German air at tacks xvliich have had as an im portant part of their purpose he smashing o civilian morale FASCIST BASE IS EVACUATED R A F REPORTS Rumanian Premier Asks Guardists to Commit Mass Suicide BULLETINS KHARTOUM AngloEgyptian Sudan forces have occupied Kcru 45 miles Inside Eritrea from the Sudan frontier it xvas reported here Saturday night STKUGA Jugoslav Frontier dispatches re ported Saturday lhat Greek troops in the coastal sector of Albania had advanced slightly through the Kcrauniaj moun tains and noxv xiere aboul a mile from the Bay of Valona south of the port of Valona BUCHAREST Ion Anlonescus government Satur duy night announced that Horia Sima leader of the rebel iron guard has been arrested and is awaiting his fate CAIRO UP British patrols xvere reported Saturday night to have entered Derna British headquarters reported that the main bofly of Italian troops had evacuated this im portant fascist base on the coast 130 miles west of Tobruk They asserted that British pa trols xxere believed to have en lercd the town but lhat the task of cleaning up Derna had not been completed The exacuation of Derna reported by RoyatoAir Force reconnaissance planes which flcxv over the town and report ed that the mainbody of Italian troops had lefi British advance armored scouts started lo nose up lo the fortifications around the base This might indicate that the Italians are retiring lo Benghazi 235 miles from Tobruk to make their main stand This report followed earlier ad vices that British patrols had con tacted Italian troops only three miles from Derna At the same time British force smashed into Ethiopia Eritrea and Italian Somalilaml i It xvas reported that British patrols thrusting along the inter ior desert trails which lead toxvartl Benghazi haxe encountered little opposition and that lie region around Derna does not appear to be so well defended as that about Bardia and Tobruk SIMA is REPORTED ARRESTED IN PURGE By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Horia Sima xvho looks more like a poet than the leader of the re bellion xvliich kept Rumania in bloody tumult this xvcek was re ported Saturday to have been ar rested in Premier Gen Ion Anton cscus spreading purge This word came directly from Bucharest xvhere the Anlon escu Kovcrnmcnt says il is in control again with Ihr tacil col laboration of German military forces Apart from the GreekItalian fighting in Albania and an over night British attack on the Ger man submarine base at Lorient France where the weather was so bad the British said thatGerman interceptor planes dared not op pose the bombers the Rumanian situation was the nearest approach to active warfare on the European continent Britain was having an unpre cedented respite from the Ger man aerial siege possibly on ac count of the weather a morn sinister cause of German preparations for inxasion of Britain War on the seaways however raged full tilt The Italian high command reported that one of its submarined had funk a 7000 ton British auxiliary cruiser loaded with troops after a sharp tight oti the Atlantic Berlin announced that its bomb ers operating from an Italian baC damaged two British battle ships and a heavy cruiser in the Mediterranean A full explanation of the rebel lion still was not available hi an enigmatic statement Fri day sirna was said to have or dered his iron guardists to capi tulate because the bloodshed docs not serve the interest of the axis ami because we know the policy of Germany and Italy re quires special conditions Gorman troops were said to be hrlpinp Rumanians loval o An tonescu patrol he capital   

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