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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - July 18, 1940, Mason City, Iowa                             nisi of VOIKC3 U NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME HOME EDITION THE NEWSPAm THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS VOL XLVI MASON CITY THE SPOT ASSOCIATED PRESS AND UNITED PRESS FUU LEASED WIRES MASON CITY IOWA THURSDAY JULY 18 1940 THIS PAPER CONSISTS OV TWO SECTIONS SECTION ONE NO 244 CHOICE OF F R FOR MATE i T T n Plans Radio Talk at Closing Democratic Session ITALIAN PLANES WT GIBRALTAR KILL THREE lowans Join Parade f Franco Hints He Wants British Base and North African Territories By UNITED PRESS The axis powers pressed a war of aerial bombs and threats Thursday against a British em pire that expressed increasing de fiance for Adolf Hitlers long still blitzkrieg offensive against the British Isles AliDlaneY believed to be Italian again bombed Gibraltar causing some damage to the greatBritish base and killing three civilians Francisco Franco cooper ated Svith hisaxis allies by hint ing that Spain wanted Gibraltar andformer North African posses sions thus raising the threat or a spectacular military blow at the rock Germans were reported to have bombarded the British military training Alder shot within 35 miles of London lo have occupied the island of Ushantoff Brittany as a possi ble addition to what the Ger man tush command described as ten good bases for attack British Isles and to have started many bie fires by aer ial attack in southern England x Italyclaiiijed to be pursuing British forces that vyithdiew fiom Moyale oh the Ethiopian frontier colony and tohave bombed British African bases with satisfactory results while Rome newspapers published re pprls that thousands ot armed Arabian warriors were concen trated on the Palestine frontier in preparation for an invasion of the Holy Land British bombing planes battled to wrest the initiative from the Germans and Italians by regular raids on vital bases and production areas in the rcich but for the most part the European war was marking time in preparation for threatened invasion of the British Isles The German high commands publication Die Wehrmaeht said that the invasion could be launched from tenbig ports some within 42 minutes of Britain and that details had been prepared even to consideration of the use of artificial fog on which Napoleon once counted to cover an invasion that he was never able to attempt Such statements by the Ger mans obviously were a part of the war of nerves with which Adolf Hitler stilt was battering Europe as a vital part of his campaign of conquest but from alloutward appearances the ef fect in Great Britain was li strengthen its determination o resisl Two TJnitedi Press correspon dentsWallace Carroll and Ed ward Beattie af ter extensive surveys of the Brit ish defense preparations that Bri tons were increasingly confident of their ability not only to repel an invasion but to turn it into a disaster for Hitler Since the defeat of France the British have prepared furiously for the first great attack on their shores in nine centuries There was no lack of realization of tuc possibility of success of such a blow by Hitler But today wilh the time of the threatened inva sion attempt slill hidden by the German the British fighting services were described as confident that they could turn back the nazis and fascists Obviously dispatches from an embattled British capital could not be expected to reflect official or military opinion as other than confident but at the same time the German delay appeared to have permitted time for fighting spirit anger and determination to mount as well as provide the time for defensive preparations Whether such developments will result In any ttiange in Hit lers plans can be only a matter ol pure specnlatlon The naii fuehrer presumably must move soon or face the prospect of delay that would force the war into another winter unless he chose to attempt to shut thr British off from Europe and strike in some other such as order to Burke Bolts Democrats to Back Wilikie WASHINGTON Iff Senator Edward R Burke D Nebr an nounced here Thursday that he would bolt democratic party ranks and support Wendell L Willkic republican for the presidency The Nebraska democratic sena tor defeated for ienomination re cently made public a letter to the republican presidential nomi nee which said As one who feels deeply that in the light of present world con ditions it is essential for our coun try tomaintain the twoterm lim itation on the tenure of office of president I shall work for your victory at the polls in November Senator Burke frequent critic of the present administration and out spoken opponent of the third term was defeated in the Nebraska democratic primary in his renom ination effort by Goy R L Cochran The senator wrote that he was certain that a host of democrats would support the re I publican nominee BRITISH WOULD Many North lowans Recall Wallace as Plain Henry Secretary Boomed for Vice President Was Secretary of Agriculture Henry Wallace teft and Senator Clyde L Hcrrine ol Iowa waving cornstalks among the notables in theRoosevelt demonstration at the democratic convention WILLKIE HEARS OF FR VICTORY Declares Voters Will Have First Opportunity to Pass on Third Term ByWILLIAM B ARDERY COLORADO SPRINGS Colo L Wilikie received word of President Roosevelts re nomination while watching the lightopera The Bartered Bride Wednesday night and then as serted thatthe nomination would give the voters their first oppor tunity to pass upon the question of a third term Wilikie was seated in an old mining town opera house at Central City when he heard that Sir Roosevelt had been renomi naied A chorus was singing and the remainder of the audi ence was unaware of the Chi sasro convention activity I am greatly gratified Wilikie said of Mr Roosevelts renomina tion It ought to be a great cam paign He described the presi dent as the author and ablest ad vocate and the directing force of the new deal This election Wilikie contin ued the voters themselves will have the opportunity to pass upon the doctrine of the indispensabil ity of one man and the sanctity of our twoterm tradition FARLEY WONT MAKE FORECAST Declines to Predict How Roosevelt Wiil Fare in November Vote C H I C A G O General James A Farley who ucI curately predicted that President j Roosevelt would carry 4G states in 1936 Thursday declined to foreI cast a Roosevelt victory in 1940 I am not at tiie moment in the role of i prophet Farley told his press conference when he was asked what ho thought of the presidents chances in November I dont want to be making any predictions Farley indicated lie might have something to say on the subject after the national committee meet ing on Friday nt which he will make his future course known v w mm mmi mmr AID IN SETTLING WAR IN ORIENT Churchill Offers Collaboration tells of Accord With Japs LONDON Minister Churchill Thursday offered Brit ish collaboration for comprom ise settlement of the Japanese Chinese war He made it clear that the aims of each belligerent must be at tained by a process of peace and conciliation and not by war or threat of war In answer to questions ill the house of commons he declared that Britain had no desire to impose a peace on China To a request lor full dress de bate on Far Eastern questions he replied that it might be ar ranged after next week He offered our collaboratioi and our contribution to the at titinments of aims of both China and Japan Churchill defended Great Brit ains accord with Japan closing the Burma road asserting tha Britain must be moved by tlv dominant fact that we are en gaged in a life and death strug gle Great BriUm is not unmindful of her obligations to China he said but she must in view ol her present struggle have re tard for Ihc present world sit The prime minister made th first formal British disclosure c the accord which provides no only for closing the Burma roa but also accedes to Japans reques to stop war materials and cer tain other goods from reachin China via Hongkong Britis crown colony Britain Encouraged by Nomination Nazis Say Nothing Changed SENATOR BURKE democrats 1ST LADY FLIES TO CONVENTION Mrs Roosevelt Takes Plane for Chicago to Make Address L O N D O URt newspapers Thursday Speaking briefly from a hotel balcony in Central City Willkic told a mining crowd that war destroys the culture like lhat jou knowand it can be main tained only in peace I dedicate myself he added to the preservation of that peace Wilikie was at a banquet when notified that President Roosevelts name had been placed in nomina tion He merely nodded When Mr ind Mrs Wilikie mci Governor Hilph L Canof Colo rado arrived in Central City a heavilywhiskered m n n haiiclcd the nominee nugget from a pros pectors mining pan A fellow gave me some gold Willkic remarked to his wife prominence to President Roose1 vcntion vclts rcnomination I The Evening News sjiicl edi torially that the republican and NEW YORK Frank lin D Roosevelt left by chartered airplane Thursday for Chicago to do whatever Jim Farley wants me lo do and then come right back quickly Farley announced Afternoon I n Chicago she would appear be ave great fore the democratic national con REPORT NAZIS BUSSED ALL VITAL TARGETS Nazi airmen slashed Thursday at England Wales Scot land md British shipping in th English channel but British ports indicated they all misse vital targets Over the channel six dive bomb crs attacked steamers An eye witness to the airsea encountc said none of the ships was hi while one of the raiders was be lieved shot down The German raids spread aga to Scotland where a bombe dropped three high explosive an several incendiary bombs on northeast town The bombs fc in an open space One house wa damaged Here Many Times The anticipated nomination of Secretary Henry A Wallace as icepresidential nominee at the lemocratic nationalconvention in Chicago Thursday night was greeted with enthusiasm by many forth lowans Thursday after ioonaccording to comments from aribus sources Hundreds of farmers in North owa have been on the Wallace andwagon for several years as evidenced by the more ithan 100 ocalfarmers who paid a plate o greet the secretaryof agricul ure at the Jackson day dinner n DCS Moines last winter and by he tact that 300 strong from eight north Iowa counties chav ered a special train from Mason to St Paul Minn this spring o let Wallace know they approved liis plan to lower farm interest rates They know him so well they refer to him simply as Henry Recent lowering of the interest rate ot commissioner loans to farmers from 4 to 3Vi per cent a well as continuance of the 3 per cent rate on federal land barif loans wascredited largely to ac tion on the part of Wallace In Cerro Gordo county th commissioner loans in effec amountto more than according to manager of the local nafiohal farm loan of fices It was recalled here Thursday in connection with the lowanJs boom for the second post position on the national ticketthat Wal lace has spoken frequently to North Iowa groups both since his elevation to the cabinet position and during the days when he was editor of Wallaces Farmer a farm journal which reputedly reaches nine out of every 10 fann homes in Iowa Farmers and businessmen alike know Wallace best as the founder of the present triple A farm pro gram developed after Wallace called representative farmers to Washington in the early part of his regime for consultation on the agricultural problem Senator Earl Dean and William McArlhur of Mason City were lenders of that delegation Wallace is a son of the late Henry secretary of agri culture in Wilsons cabinet is a graduate of Iowa State college Ames owns a large farm near Des Moines nnd is prominently identified with the hybrid seed corn development in this state HERRING NAME S WITHDRAWN Iowa Caucus Votes Complete Support for Secretary Wallace By W EARL HALL GlobeGazetteManaging Editor of Agri ultureHenry A Wallace wasas ured Iowas 22 votes for the vice early Thursday after loqnwhcn Justice R F Mitchell ort Dodge addressed the caucus viih a message from U S Sena or Clyde Herring In it Senator Herring said there vas no reason for dissension or lisharmony within either hecau cus or convention that he always hrpugh his long years ot service brj the democratic party had aeen willing to sacrifice for its nogrcss In the best interests of jarty harmony he tidded he was removing himself as a candidate for the vice presidential nomina tion With this statement the caucu quickly adjourned as delegate left for Thursdays opening ses sion at the stadium Frank OConnor Dubuque at tdrney will place Wallaces nam innomination for the post FRANK OCONNOR Nominate Wallace 8 TO BE PAROLED DES MOINES Iowa parole board Thursday announced that eight former lifers are scheduled for lease on parole next month from the Fort Madison 0WAN ASSURED OF 2ND PLACE ON PARTY LIST Other Contenders for Vice President Quickly Make Withdrawals STADIUM stration managers Tilur sd a y picked the slate of Franklin D Roosevelt Land Henry A Wallace o carry democralic third term colors in the 1940 presidential Word that President Roosevelt lad approved choice of Wallace ashis running mate swept all serious vice presidential conten ders out of the race within two lours and plans were quickly whipped up to conclude the con vention Thursday night with a big democratic show The feature attraction will be a radio address by Presi dent Roosevelt from Washington in which he speaks publicly for the first time on the unpre cedented third term and the conventions vote early Thurs day to draft him for another campaign Before Mr Roosevelt speaks the convention will conclude all other business It will meet at7 p m 6 p m Iowa time and hear Wallaces name placed in nomination The likelihood that no othervname will to the Jones of Texas backed by National Chair man James A Farley took his name out of consideration as did virtually all other contenders as rapidly as they learned that Wal lace was the presidents choice After a tiuick ballot or a mo tion of unanimity the plan was for Senator James F Byrnes of South Carolina lo read to the convention a telegram from the president acknowledging notifi cation that he had been nom inated and thanking the conven tion The presidents address will fol low immediately alter the reading of his telegram It was expected to be piped to the convention hall by radio or telephone line although there were rumors around the con vention city of thepossibility of a dramatic lastminute airplane flight from Washington and a per sonal Roosevelt appearance at the hall Wallace a iormer republican iias served in Mr Roosevelts cab inet since 1032 The decision to choose Wallace president to run wilh Die campaign which attain a spectacular but not de cisive triumph i If such a course were followed by the Germans Hitler presum ably would resort to siege and possibly some new offer of a dic tated peace in his campaign to j eliminate Britain as a major power i in Europe j In the far east the Japanese premierdesignate Prince Fumi maro Konoye drew nearer to the axis powers by selection of Yo suke Matsuoka as his foreign min ister and consideration of General Eiki Tojo as war minister democratic platforms present no perceptible differences to eyes on this side of the Atlantic in their references to help for Britain in her struggle The Evening Star said that We can view the situation with great encouragement in that both can didates are men who will see that Britain gets such help as America cangive her NAZIS SEE NO CHAXGE IN POLITICAL SITUATION BERLIN Nazi quarters said that President Roosevelts re nominution had caused no surprise here Practically no new element is introduced in the foreign political situation an authorized in formant Mid since Mr Roose velts position is well known Attention was called to the platform resolution not to send troops abroad The spokesman commented that expressions of sympathy toward the allies were to be expected Girl Naughty as Dress Catches AHre Goes to Bed Dies ATLANTIC CITY N J Three year old Sylvia Ann Hills dress caught fire while she was playing with a gas stove in her home Instead of running for aid she went to bed as she had been trained to do when naughty The dress set the bed covers aflame further injuring the child Neighbors the girls parents were out at the time found her sob bing in the doorway of her home her dress burned completely off She died an hour later Mercury Soars fro 98 in Mason City The mercury soared to 98 in The Weather FORECAST IOWA Partly cloudy Thurs day nighl and Friday warmer extreme cast Thursday night MINNESOTA Partly cloudy Thursday night and Friday cool er extreme southwest Thursday night IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statis new cabinet appeared likely to be otto thai would work in closest j cooperation with the army and navy plans for expansion in Ilic I far cast and the south sens Y as Iowa sweltered in n sudden i upturn in temperature Iowa terni pernturcs ranged from 102 at Sioux City arid 101 at Council Bluffs down to 8S at Davenport 30 at Iowa City 94 at Mount Ayr and 9G at Montczuma i Maximum Wednesday HfiHimum Wednesday At 8 a m Thursday YEAR AGO Maximum Minimum Rain 82 fix 74 72 HENRY A WALLACE for Vice President KRANKUN DKLANO ROOSEVKLT Rcnomination   

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