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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: November 22, 1939 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - November 22, 1939, Mason City, Iowa                             HAHLUN t R HIST MCU 4 i DEPT OF IRV C E S t C I v r NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME VOL XLVI ASSOCIATED PRESS AND inflTED PRESS FULL LEASED WIRES FIVE CENTS A COPV THE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS MASON CITY IOWA WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 22 MASON CITY TH1 BRIGHT WOT THIS PAPER CONSISTS OF SECTIONS SECTION ONE NO 38 NAZIS BOMB SHETLAND ISLANDS Corn Loan 57c a Bushel Perkins to Retain Position By CHARLES P STEWART Central Press Columnist IF YOU HAVE concluded in your masculine mind a lady reader my column writes to me from Berkeley Cal that women stick together that they favor their sex going places in polities regardless o f how the woman may conduct in of fice you sure ly dont know women What I did was to write a column s u m ming up the respective rec ords to date of our various Secrelary cabinet mem Perkins bers and en deavoring as well as I was able to assess their assorted popu larities In due course I got down to Labor Secretary Frances Perkins Now I know as well as anybody that plenty of people dont overly like Modem Perkins Shes a bit too radical in her views for some She also has a rather un diplomatic personality Her tongue is sharp and she isnt at all hesi tant to say whatever she thinks Perkins No Tdol sties ho idol with the generality of riewspapermehwho attend her press conferences Im acquainted with several labor leaders who make very disagreeable remarks on account of her policies but because of sarcastic unpleasant things shes said to them Nevertheless my impression was that shes most solidly in trenched in her cabinet post while the Roosevelt New Deal lasls One reason I had for believing so is that outstanding feminists Ive met swear by her by an overwhelming majority A number of these national feminist organ izations have headquarters in Washington Ive talked with a goodly bunch of them They were nearly unanimously Maybe they didnt all like her personally but they evidently felt that as our first woman cabinet member she was entitled to their unqualified support in office Feminist Sentiment So I concluded that due to fem inist sentiment shes as irremov able as the Washington monument so long as the New Deal prevails I still surmise that Im right so far as concerns professional fem inists I likewise surmise that such is the administrations that it wouldnt dare to disturb her politically lest a feminist political revolt ensue But perhaps I was mistaken in relying too utterly upon the ver dict of prominent feminists with out consulting the ranknndfile of women I admit I dont know em all I thought the prominent ones were a characteristic cross section My Berkeley correspondent as sures me that my guess is the most astonishing one that she ever read And Heres Why And Ill tell you why she adds About six years ago she re lates I was in a group of women some republicans and some demo crats and the only thing that every woman in that room agreed on was that Miss Perkins was a mistake Some of the democrats who were vehemently proRoosevelt made the remark that they would hesitate to vote for Roosevelt at the next election if they thought he would put that woman in the cabinet again but they were sure of course that by then he would have realized his error A critic like this should be identified Its Estelle MacMahon of Berke ley Theres no request for anonymity Comment by other ladies will be welcomed GIVEN FARMERS WHOJQINEDAAA Loan Rate to Be 43c a Bushel Outside of Midwest Corn Area WASHINGTON Secretary Wallace announced Wednesday the government would make loans to farmers on surplus 1939gvown corn at the base rate of 57 cents a bushel Eligible for loans at this rale will be farmers in the midwestern commercial corn belt who did not plant in excess of this years agri cultural adjustment administra tion corn acreage allotments Farmers who planted in excess of such allotments will not be eligible The rate is the same as that pro vided in a similar loan program last year The commercial area comprises 36 major cornproducing coun ties in Iowa Missouri Illinois In diana Ohio Kentucky Kansas Nebraska Michigan Minnesota Wisconsin and South Dakota Elsewhere loans will be made at 75 per cent of the base rate or 43 cents a bushel to farmers who did not plant in excess of their AAA soildepleting acreage allotments The principal purpose of the loan program officials said was to bolster prices of the feed grain by Helping needed portions of this years big crop off the market They esti mated that between 200000000 and 300000000 bushels of the 1939 crop of 2591000000 bushels may be stored under loan LOANS WILL BE Taft claims PRESS SPEECH Corn Loan Is Unsound Plan G 0 P Presidential Aspirant From Ohio Is Des Moines Visitor i oo busllels of and 1938 com are now stored I under previous loan programs Cedar Rapids Man Is Fined Jailed 60 Days for Mishap IOWA CITY J a m e s Sorenson 24 Cedar Rapids must spend 60 days in jail and pay a fine of for failing to stop after his automobile struck and injured Harry Cloud state high way patrolman from Cedar Rap ids The accident occurred while Cloud was directing traffic away from the IowaMinnesota foot ball game last Saturday Sorenson was traced through the license numbers on his car and was sentenced Tuesday by Judge Harola D Evans FIRE CAUSES DAMAGE WAUKON destroyed a barn garage and crib on tlic airs Anna Manderscheid acreage here Tuesday Loss was estimated at 51500 By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS LONDON t a 5 i an steamer hits mine British warship intercepts German freighter Britain plans blockade of all German ex ports B E R L I an nounce Munich man con fessed Nov 8 bomb attempt against Hitler two alleged British plotters held PARIS front quiet HONGKONGJapa nese planes bomb Nanking little progress reported in new Japanese drive DES MOINES JF Senator Robert Taft of Ohio republican presidential aspirant Wednesday invaded the tall corn state of Iowa with a frank declaration that he considers the federal corn loan system to be in the long run an unsound policy The government has entered into certain obligations regard ing crop loans which of course should be carried out the sen ator said in a press conference here An attempt to solve the cotton surplus by a similar loan system has left the government in pos session of over 11000000 sales of that commodity he said So far as I can see that supply makes the cotton problem almost unsolvable he added Remember how the Hoover farm board was criticized when it purchased 3000000 bales of cotton The senator asserted that government crop control and loan efforts in the long run do more harm fo prices and to the producer than if they had not been undertaken He said it was a serious ques tion whether the government will not lose large through deterioration particular ly in such commodities as corn and wheat He warned the republican party not to attempt to outnew deal the new deal in its IfliO platform The department of agriculture Wednesday announced a i7cents a bushel corn loan on the 193 crop the 257000000 sealed in the About half bushels of corn ule United States last year was stored in Iowa cribs Federal efforts toward solving the farm problem should be di rected towards increasing con sumption rather than limiting production Taft said The sena tor however did not advocate cutfimr the farmer out of the sovernmcnial assisfance picture altogether He placed his stamp of approval for example on payments for followingestab lished soil conservation prac tices The general theory is that the farmer is entitled to some sub sidy he added He gets much less for his work than wage rates es tablished in cities Soil conserva tion also is important to the na tion as a national condition SENATOR ROBERT TAFT RIGHTS UPHELD BY HIGH COURT Municipalities Told Ordinances Must Not Abridge Such Freedom WASHINGTON su preme court ruled Wednesday that municipalities in their exercise of controls over public safety health and convenience must not abridge freedom of speech and press In an unprecedented Wednes day decision day the court held unconstitutional the ordi nances of four cities which had been challenged on the grounds that they violated civil liberties Then acting in two other im portant cases lie court Held that a corporation may be sued in a state other than the one in which it is incorporated Affirmed the dismissal of anti trust charges against 11 defendants in the governments case against major midwest oil companies W In a decision in the oil anti trust case however it was by a 4to4 vote and therefore is not final A tie vote automatically upholds the decision of the lower court in this instance that of Judge Patrick T Stone of Hie seventh circuit court of appeals The decision was announced in a brief per curiam opinion The actionleaves the open fbr the rovernmeatto recbri staeraUon of the matter wheh the ninth ineraber of the court is appointed The vacancy is due to the death of Justice Pierce Butler in whose honor the court delayed its regular Monday ses sion until Wednesday W In the civil liberties cases three ordinances outlawed by the court banned distributing leaflets in the publicstreets of Los Angeles Milwaukee and Worcester Mass The fourth involved doortodoor circulation of religious tracts by members of a religious sect the Jehovahs witnesses who com plained that the Irvington N J ordinance against such practice infringed on their proper exercise ofreligious freedom and freedom of speech and press Although a municipality may enact regulations in the interest of public safety health welfare or convenience these may not abridge the individual liberties secured by the consti tution to those who wish to speak write print or circulate information or opinion the court said The decision pertaining to suits against corporations was limited in its effect to states which re quire a corporation to appoinl a voluntary agent The action was in the case of the New Jersey stockholders of United Shipyards Inc which objected to transfer of united properties to the Beth lehem Shipbuilding Corp Ltd The Weather FORECAST IOWA Generally fair Wed nesday night and Thursday not so cold in central and west Wednesday night warmer Thursday MINNESOTA Partly cloudy Wednesday night and Thurs day rising temperature Wed nesday night and in cast and south Thursday IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather figures for 24 hour period ending at 8 a m Wednesday Maximum Tuesday 42 Minimum in Nifjht 15 At 8 a m Wednesday 19 YEAR AGO Maximum 45 Minimum 7 Admits Hitler Bombing TWO BRITISH AGENTS SEIZED Hitler Foe Strasser and EnglariHrAfrctfserJ of Assassination Plot BERLIN war among secret agents leaped iiito the lime light Wednesday with the gc stapos announcement that a Mun ich plotter had confessed the Nov 2 attempt on Adolf Hitlers life and that two British operatives had been seized Heinrich Himmler chief ot the secret police said Gedre El ser 36 year old resident of Mun ich planted a time bomb in the nazi beer cellar shrine there at the instigation of Otto Strasser longrtime Hitler foe and with funds furnished by Great Brit ain He did not linlc the two captive Britons specifically with the blast but accused them of organizing plots in Germany Himmler said that in trying to reach Switzerland Elser was caught on the night of the explo sion which killed eight persons and which Hitler escaped by II minutes Elser confessed Nov 14 he said ana several accomplices were arrested but the informa tion was kept secret until Tues day nisht to expedite other seiz ures Himmler appealed to all citizens for further information regarding Elser or former asso ciates He did not mention the govern ments offer of rewards totaling 5360000 for arrest of the Munich plotters and authorities declined to comment on it Eight nazis were killed in the Munich blast Reporting another angle of the undercover warwithinwar of ri val secret services Himmler said a Captain Stevens and a Mr Best of the British intelligence were captured Nov 9 while at tempting to enter Germany from Venloo the Netherlands He accused the British of be ing duped by German agents posing as disgruntled officers He said that in attempting o organize piofs against the reich they supplied radio equipment with which the Germans kept up deceptive communications until Tuesday In London the British foreign office denied any agent of the British government had any knowledge of a German de scribed as having placed a bomb in the Munich cellar Tiie foreign office said there was no connection between toe bombing and the kidnaping of two British subjects on the Ger manDutch Strasser accused of organizing the Munich plotbrokewith Hit to power He last wasrepoTted in Paris where the Paris Soir quoted him Monday as saying he fled Zurich Switzerland four hours ahead of a German extradition re quest A onelime nazi lieutenant Strasser left Germany after bc iiiff deprived or citizenship in 3934 the same year his brother Gregor was killed in the blood purge Ho heads the black front opposing Hitlers regime and has operated from various Elser credited by the gestapo with building the bomb in a man ner unique in criminal history was said to have started machina tions in September and October 1938 and to have begun putting his plans together in August 1939 a First said Himmler he built a sixday time clock into a pillar of the beer cellar and seven days before theannual nazi celebration there the explosive was planted On Nov 2 and 3 Elser failedin attempts to place a detonator in he bursting chamber said the gestapo chief but succeeded dur ing the night of Nov 45 Then he left for Switzerland but returned to Munich Nov 7 to make sure all was in order nnd lo deaden the found of tlie ticking clock GangPaints 85 and 95 Over 35 Mile an Hour Traffic Signs j DES MOINES arc looking for a gang of youths which has beentrying to speed up traf fic in suburban areas With theaid of paint and a brush the youths havechanged read 85 or 95 miles an hour NUTS HARTFORD Conn Lillian L Malley first woman elected to Hartfords board of aldermen did it with cigarets and nuts Those were the only items listed in her campaign expendi tures cigarets and 87 cents for nuts LOOK INSIDE FOR PREMIER NOBUYUKI ABE Announces Japan to Keep Troops in China PAGE 2 Nile Kinnick Ranks at Top in List of Stars PAGE 11 Iowa Traffic Toll 21 Per Cent Higher New York Publisher Frank Gannett Talks at Cedar Rapids Dec 4 CEDAR RAPIDS E Gannett of Rochester N Y pub lisher of the Gannett newspapers and who was an organizer and leader in the successful fight several 35niileanhour signs to against the supreme court pack FCaci nrt nr J1T mi IncTnVnmT iium iaiuoini bven F D Rs Family Is Confused About Thanks hirss srtssjsis m ing bill will speak in Cedar Rap ids Dec 4 at a luncheon meeting sponsored by the interservice club council Delegations from nearby towns as well as members of all local luncheon clubs and their guests are expected to hear Mr Gannett The luncheon will be held at the Roosevelt hotel Mr Gannett who heads the Na tional Committee to Uphold Con stitutional Government will stop m Cedar Rapids while flying home from California in his own plane WASHINGTON half the country will observe Thanksgiving day Thursday but the confusion which fol lowed President Roosevelts de cision to advance the customarv date has extended into his own family The chief executive and the first lady will have their tur key dinner Thursday night at the Warm Springs Ga foun dation for infantile paralysis patients Some of their child ren however will observe both Thursdays holiday and the one proclaimed by ROV ernors in some states for Nov 30 James Roosevelt the pvesi denfi eldest son will celebrate in New York Thursday and then RO to Massachusetts which has selected the traditional last Ihursday in November Mr and Mrs John Roosevelt also will have their turkey at Nahant Mass on the second Thanks giving ft The governor of Texas pro claimed both Thursdays as a holiday so Mr and Mrs Elliott Roosevelt will have two dinner Mr and Mrs Franklin D Roose velt Jr will have turkey Thursday at their cottage in Charlottesville Va but next week they will have guests for Thanksgiving recess of the Uru versity of Virginia v The presidents er Mrs John Boettiger of Seattle wifl follow her fathers ex ample and observe only the first Thanksgiving The last time a and he was the Lincoln tradition of having Thanksgiving on Novembers last Thursday no calendr manufacturers complained no football schedules were upset no Christmas business boom was anticipated President Grant just said that whereas the country had been prosperous and free of pestilence and peaceful he would recom mend that Thursday the nay of November next be ob served as a day of Thanksgiv ing in 1869 The proclamation Rot onlv one sentence in small type un der the Domestic Intelli gence heading in Harpers Weekly From 1621 date ot the first Thanksgiving until Grants tme the holiday had been brated in eight of the 12 months Five republican governors de cided to observe President Roosevelts Thanksgiving in their states but 12 held to the old rlate Seventeen democrats choc the new date 11 the old Nearly all the governors said they would proclaim Nov in stead of Nov 28 next year when difficulties in advancing the date could be eliminated PLANES ATTACK IN HEAVY FIRE SEAPLANE HIT Successful British Flights Over Nazi Cities Are Reported LONDON air raiders bombed the Shet land islands and set fire to a Royal Air Force seaplane Wednesday in two sharp thrusts at Britain A communique said the nuzi raiders first made an attack on shipping hut were driven off and then at tacked a seaplane at a mooringand set it afire A r a i d warning was sounded in the Shetlands this morning the communique reported An unsuccessful attack was made on shipping1 in this area The attack was driven off by antiaircraft fire The enemy then attacked with bombs a Royal Air Force seaplane lying at moor ings and set it on fire We suffered no casualties The air ministry also an nounced the Royal Air Force had made successful flights on Monday and Tuesday over Stuttgart Frankfort Ham burg and Bremen Six planes tookpart in the raid but failed Ttp hits British sources nonnced Antiaircraft guns also roared in South Essex during the afternoon but villagers said no planes were visible An east coast antiaireratt bal tery fired a dozen rounds at a Geiman bomber flying out to sea British planes followed the nazi aircraft The admiralty announced a British warship had intercepted the 4110ton German freighter Bertha Fisser off Icelands coast stating the crew started to sink the ship tool to their boats and were then picked up by the war ship f A dispatch from Reykjavik Iceland indicated the German ship may have been shelled The KG60ton Italian freigh ter Fianona was added to the list of mine victims off Eng lands southeast coast Although she was badly damaged by an explosion Tuesday night she was still afloat Wednesday She the 16th victim of mine and torpedo warfare off the British Isles in the last five days Aerial warfare also was active ivith German planes rcconnoiter mg the cast coast for the third successive day A German plane flew over villages along the mouth of the Thames in southeast Eng land and another believed to be also German flew over the Shet land islands off northern Scotland The plane which flew over the mouth of the Thames was beset by antiaircraft live and Royal Air Force fighters It dived and hedge hopped to oft the pursuer No air raid varning was sounded The government announced that three German flyers whn niloled a reconnaissance plane lo the eastern outskirts of Lon don Monday had been rescued from a rubber boat in Hie Xortli sea and taken prisoner bv the Two were said io be badly wounded Previously it had been reported simply that the craft had been driven out to sea Tuesday a German plane was shot down over the cast coasf ff As the export seizure reprisal was clamped down on Germany tuc British government said that neutral traders would receive the most sympathetic consideration possible The new measure calls lor seizure of all German exports on the high seas regardless of whether they are in neutral ves sels or German A spokesman said the sole aim S to1 drive German products off the seas and thereby shut off for oign exchange to Germany Ho accod that the ministry of eco nomic warfareis giving the dccp ct study to the problem of appli cation of the new measure in a manner not lo work hardships on neutrals In Paris it was announced ciaJJv that France had decided Jtf   

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