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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: September 8, 1939 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - September 8, 1939, Mason City, Iowa                             NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME fl HIST utu A if r DEPT Of COUP ots uoiNES u VOL XLV THH NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES AIL NORTH 10WANS NEIGHBORS ASSOCIATED PBESS AND UNITED PHCSS PUli LEASED WIRES FIVE CENTS A COPY MASON CITY IOWA FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 8 1939 MAJON CITY THE BRIGHT SPOT A THIS PAPER CONSISTS OP TWO SECTIONS SECTION ONE NO 286 NAZIS SAY WARSAW ENTERED Britain Intensifies Sub Hunt 6ROWNELECTED STATE CHIEF OF INSURANCE MEN E C Cady Is Named Vice President as Convention Ends Here STORY ON PAGE 1C Harry C Brown of Mason City was elected president of the Iowa Association of Insurance Agents as approximately 260 delegates closed their final business session of the 33rd state convention held in Mason City E C Cady of Burlington was named vice president and John S Cutter of Shenandoah was ve elected for his sixth term as sec retarytreasurer the organiza tion B C Hopkins of Des Moines retiring president was named chairman of the executive board and H W Forshay of Anita was reelected national councilor The attending delegates resolved that the countersignature com mission created by the passing of the state counter signature law affects only the agent residing at the location of the insured proper ty and any centralization agency appointment for the state is con trary to agency ethics of practice andra violation 6f the constitution delegationwon the attendance cup with 21 mem bers registered and a total of 2 700 miles traveled to the conven tioon The award was made on the basis of the number of registered members and the total miles trav eled to the convention Des Moines and Cedar Rapids submitted bids for the 1940 con vention site and the Invitations were referred to the executive committee to be selected at a later date In the closing session in the Hotel Htnford Claude W Borrett of Des Moines urged the delegates to promote the state and national insurance associations in order to further the progress of the busi ness V You need the association and the association needs you Mr Borrett pointed out They do not need you for the dues alone but in addition for your support and cooperation You need the asso ciation because it can and does help you with many problems Mr Borrett concluded by ex plaining that local boards affiliated with the state and national asso ciations can help the various agents reach a common ground and therefore push ahead without feeling of distrust in competition K W Forshay of Anita presided at the national councillors break fast conference during which problems of local agents were sub mitted to a roundtable discussion New and old members of the executive committee conferred at R luncheon held in the Hotel Han ford The convention was conclud ed with a program of golf at the Mason City Golf and Country club A total 227 delegates and wives heard Charles F Thomas of Chicago talk on Our Busi ness during the banquet in the Hotel Hanford Thursday night which climaxed the three day con vention HARRY C BROWN President Warsaw Target of Nazi Shells and Bombs as Losses of Ships Increase OrdersUS Defense Increases WASHINGTON Roosevelt Friday proclaimed a limited national emergency to safeguard United States neutrality and to strengthen national de fense Emphasizing at a press confer ence that under no circumstances would the nation be put on a war time basis the president said the proclamation would involve in creases in the military branches but not to the extent of the full authorized peacetime strength The president said that four executive orders would be issued by the attorney general later in the day authorizing the following four steps under the proclama tion the army and calling back first line re serves to increase the enlisted strength but nowhere near he full 280000 peace lime author ization The actual increase has not yet been decided the navy person nel but not to the full extent of the 130000 peace time author ization The navy now has be tween 115000 and 120000 men and this figure will be increased to a total not yet determined The increases also will affect the national guard and marine corps all to fill in what the presi dent described as chinks and gaps in the military branches tlic slate de partment under its emergency funds to use S500000 to assist Americans to come home from the war zone the personnel of federal investigating agencies to protect the United States against sabotage propaganda and other subversive activities such as this nation experienced between 1914 and 1917 Jugoslav Mobilization Reports Are Denied BELGRADE govern ment formally denied Friday what Jt termed London rumors of Jugoslav mobilization Officials declared the report broadcast from London completely untrue Wilson Defies F R Action Makes Thanksgiving Nov 30 George A Wilson Friday look issue with the president over the date of Thanksgiving day and declared tnwanc will observe it on the usual datethe last Thursday in No It would he a shame to introduce commercial aspects instead of religious solemnity as a basis of our day of thanks the eov crnor S3id attributed President Roosevelts decision to move the date up a Nov that merchants wished to have a longer period between Thanksgiving and Christmas PAID FOR HEREFORDS 2894 Head Cattle Sold at Auction of Oswald Strand Manly PICTURE ON PAGE 2 By STAFF REPRESENTATIVE total of was paid for 28S4 read of Here ford cattle sold at Oswald Strands 35th annual auction held in the Strand yards Thursday in the largest sale ever held by the North Iowa stockbuyer Many buyers gathered from Iowa Minnesota Wisconsin and Michigan Thursday afternoon for the cattle sale This sale is one of the largest ever held by an in dependent stockbuyer Early arriving buyers gathered at the yard Thursday morning and bought 1000 head of cattle be fore the auction began The cattle were mostly whitefaced beeves which Mr Strand had purchased m Wyoming and Nebraska Among the towns represented with buyers were Northwood New Providence Oelwein St Ansgar Fenton Elkhart Thor Rowley Titonka Traer Grundy Center Radcliffe Clear Lake Garner Fairbanks Klemme Ka nawha Osage Greene and Lake Mills Caledonia Dover Ellen dale and Cannon Falls Minn Hastings Mich and Wisconsin One the buyers Emil Tydari of Hastings Mich is the inventor of the seal used on boxcars Art Thompson of Lincoln Nebr was the chief auctioneer while J R Dorsey C M Sheimo and Clayton Frieberg were his as sistants It was estimated that there was a crowd of 2500 at the sale The Northwest Savings bank of Mason City represented by C S Thompson Dean Lightner and IC Jensen clerked the sale LOOK INSIDE FOR FRITZ KUHN Has AH the Answers for Blaming Others PAGE 2 Allison Woman Shot Accidentally at Fair PAGE 8 Eddie Anderson Thinks of One Enemy at Time PAGE 9 RELIEF BOOST THREATENED DES MOINES of the state board of social welfare said that if the European war re sults in continued extreme in creases in the price of foodstuffs Iowa counties may be forced to shoulders serious additional emer gency relief cost SCORE IS 5 TO 3 IN FAVOR OF UBOAT ATTACK Submarines Are Off to Far Faster Start Than in World War BULLETINS AMSTERDAM THE NETH ERLANDS Government officials announced that 29 of 51 persons aboard a Netherlands minesweeper were killed Friday when an explosion sank the vessel off the West Frisian Is lands northern Netherlands The officials said the mine sweeper struck a mine in terri torial waters and went down within a minute after the ex plosion LISBON iff The Italian steamer Castelbianci reported Friday she had rescued 23 more members of the crew of the British freighter Manaar which survivors said was torpedoed NEW YORK Hol landAmerican line said Friday its liner Statcndam had radioed that it had picked up the 37 members of the crew of ihe British steamship Winklcigli There was no indication in the message what had happened to the The Statendam wsstwo tfaysTmtrfSouthamp ton when shemade the rescue BERLIN official1 news agency said Friday that he German steamer Frankcn was attached by British planes in Dutch waters off Sumatra It was stated that the Frankcn made port at Fadaiw Sumatra without being damaged NEWCASTLE porls received Friday night said that the British stcameh Puk kastan had been sunk by a sub marine in the Atlantic NEW YORK 1P Radio marine Corporation Friday re ported a radio saying t Ii e steamer Jcanjadot advises saved crew 44 men of SS Re gent Tiger British topedocd by submarine Lloyds register lists the ship as a British tanker of 10176 tons By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS It was Englands mighty sur face fleet against Germanys un dersea raiders all over again Fri day as naval activity took a lead ing role in Europes new war With the Uboats off to a fast by far than in the world score at the end of five days of conflict stood 5 lo 3 in favor of the nazis In ton nage the British have lost 32 143 to the nazis 14037 all in merchantmen This counted only the known losses At least two other British freighters and a French vessel were attacked by submarines lying in wait for prey in the At lantic but one reached port safely and the fate the others was not yet known British reports indi cated additional losses on both sides Three British freighters were added to the sunken passenger liner Athenia which Berlin de nies was torpedoed and the freighter Bosnia on the list of those sunk Those lost gross tons sunl about 100 miles off the Portuguese coast 88 in crew two known dead three wounded 30 missing as in case of the Athenia surviv ors said submarine fired on sink ing ship as crew sought to escape tons loaded with sugar sunk off Irish coast crew of 33 saved by U S liner Washington whose captain Giles Stedman reported sub comman der as most courteous in order ing British crew to lifeboats be fore torpedoing offering to tow lifeboats toward land firing sig nal rockets which enabled the Washington to sight the lifeboats less than an hour after SOS was received Royal tons built in 1937 loss announced by British but no details given In addition the U S liner American Farmer enroutc to Eng land reported the British Puk kastan 580D tons and the French French Advance 7 Miles PARIS The northern flank of the French army was reported Friday night to have driven seven to eight miles within German ter Tins information which was re ceived without confirmation by the high command bore out other reports of fighting on the western front which said the French ad vance at the end of the sixth day of fighting had averaged from three to four miles Tanks and armored cars were rcporteil for the first time to have entered the conflict sup porting infantry in a jrivcand take action between French and Gcrman troops in the no mans land at the tip of the western frontier where the French Jtpj inot and the German Siegfried lines fan out to a distance of 25 miles apart An advance eight miles within German territory would place French advance guards at the ex treme northern end the front approximately half way between the German frontier and the Sieg fried line The French high command Fri day reported its armies progress ing across the German frontier thrfiHShthe wooded approaches to the Siegfried line New advances an nounced by the war ministrys communique No 9 Friday morn ing were strengthening the spear heads driven into Germanys Saar basin Despite spirited German re sistance and reinforcement of German fronps on the western front the French appeared to be pressing their attacks to relieve Poland from pressure in the east There the Poles were expected to take a stand along thi river Vistula to defend Warsaw W if The French army engaged in fresh action during the early morning Although the advances were reported to be of varied importance the general staff broke away from its traditional re serve to say they were improv ing noticeably the conditions of our advance at certain points The zero hour for a general offensive against the steel and concrete fortifications of the Siegfried line appeared to he approaching The British expeditionary force and newly mobilized French troops continued moving into the lines Raiders Drop Heavy Bombs on Warsaw Radio Reports Polish Retreat Is Made for Reasons of Strategy EDITORS NOTE The follow ing dispatch was filed in War saw Wednesday just before Warsaw radio communications ceased functioning It was re ceived in New York Friday The Warsaw radio broadcasting sta tion sitent Thursday renewed operations Friday BULLETINS CANNES France Duke and Duchess of Windsor left for England Friday night ending almost three years of ex ile The duke who abdicated as kinff and exiled himself to be married to his Americanborn duchess was called home by Kinff George VI who succeeded him tt the throne to help fight the war against Germany MOSCOW Russia Friday night was rushing raw materials to the western front there appeared to be the possibility of Germany estab lishing a border with Russia Tamar1 3747 tons were attacked by submarines off the European coast and the British ministry of information disclosed the Corin thic 4823 tons had been attacked by n sub but reached an unnamed port safely The known German losses were the freighters Olinda Carl Fritzen and motorship Inn all sunk pre sumably by British cruisers Even more significant was the British official report that the kings navy was steadily driving German mer chantmen from the Brit ish aim in wartime Thus far one neutral Greek freighter been reported destroyed It hit a Ger man mine in the Baltic where several other unidentified craft also were reported to have gone Ky LLOYD LEHRBAS WARSAW warn ing German raiders Wednesday dropped a large number of ex tremely heavy bombs about p a m C S T aiming at bridges and other military ob jectives along the Vistula river It was the heaviest raid yet on the Polish capital Explosions shook the office of the Associated Press and shattered windows in n radius of several blocks The raiders powerdived almost dozen times and I was able to watch the actual bombs which ex ploded with deafening roars send ing up gigantic ilouds of smoke Each whining powerdive was followed by earthshaking explo sions altogether too close for com fort I was unable immediately to as certainthe damage but it must have been heavy on the north bank of the river whereall the bombs were directed The Weather FORECAST IOWA Generally fair Friday ntghl and Saturday cooler in east and south portions Friday nisilit somewhat warmer Satur day in extreme west portion MINNESOTA Generally fair Friday niffilt and Saturday cooler in extreme southeast por tion not so coo in northwest portion Friday nijfht warmer Saturday IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statis tics maximum Thursday 38 Minimum Thursday night 57 At 8 a m Friday 59 After Thursdays high of 38 the mercury took a nose dive of 41 degrees to a minimum of 57 Thursday night YEAR AGO Maximum 85 Minimum 57 Rain 87 ARMORED CARS BACKED UP BY MOTOR TROOPS Heavy Artillery Is Brought Up If Needed to Besiege Capital BERLIN German high command an nounced Friday that swift motonzed units of the Ger man army had entered War saw at p m a m C S T V Although the announce ment did not claim the Polish capital had been captured the German people jumped lo Unidentified Sub Is Reported Seen Near U S Coast BOSTON unidenti fied submarine was sichted Fri day by the crew of the Pollock Rip lightship which guards the westerly approach to Nantuckel sound coastguard headquarters at Boston reported Those aboard the lightship said the submersible had no identi fying marks and that she was headed in a southerly direction Coastguards said it wmi pos sible that the craft might been an American submarine that conclusion and Berlin was wildly excited Newspaper extras said Warsaw Falls The reported entry came a week after the invasion of Po land began There was no indication from the communique wheth er there was fighting in War saw or how far the armored units had penetrated into the city Military sources however said heavy artillery was following the motorized troops closely to besiege Warsaw if necessary V Nazi motorized divisions behind the fasttraveling armored cars were said to be within 10 miles of the city Both the Danish radio and a dispatch of the Hungarian official Germans Move on Warsaw advancc by stubborn Polish resistance map 8ives tlc of Poland as the three tnrv moVtlli together Shaded areas indicate Polish terri Germans Beriin claimed the Polish in that surrendered Wcsterplaite relieving pressure i i Thcsncahead of the German southern army apparent 1 moved closer to Warsaw o execute the maneuver of cutKnsr off the Poles m the area west of the capital caught between the nccr   

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