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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: September 5, 1939 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - September 5, 1939, Mason City, Iowa                             NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME HIST MEM 4 ART 0EPT OF IOWa COUP DCS Wo I ES f VOL XLV THE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS ASSOCIATED PRESS AND UNITED PRUSS FUU LEASED WIRES FIVE CENTS A COPS wuuu MASON CITY IOWA TUESDAY SEPTEMBER 5 1939 MASON C1TV THE BRIGHT SPOT IlilS PAPER CONSISTS OP TWO SECTIONS SECTION ONE Ship Torpedoed and Then Shelled Survivors Relate Stories of Horror When British Steamer Sank Beneath Ocean t V merhiint Athenia reported Monday they were torpedoed by HOLIDAY DEATH TOLL UP TO 373 Traffic Accidents Leading Cause Midwest Loss Is Heaviest BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Violent deaths in the nation during the Labor day weekend numbered at least 373 Traffic accidents as usual were the leading cause of death At least 232 persons were killed on streets and highways as thousands of motorists jammed roadways for the final double holiday outin of the summer Brownings shootings train ac cidents and other causes swelled the list of fatalities The nation counted at least 49 drownings The middlewest suffered the heaviest loss of life Food Control Groups in England Authorized LONDON British board of trade authorized Tuesdav the appointment of food control committees throughout the coun France Announces Army Has Penetrated Nazi Territory Rumble of Guns Is Heard m Amsterdam Foreign Planes Seen PARIS Via French government Tuesday an nounced that French forces had made contact with the German troops on the western front and had penetrated into German terri tory A semiofficial Paris radio re ported trouble in Germany and sard there had been disorders in Cologne Dusseldorf and Essen as well as the areas of all Czecho slovakia Dispatches from Copenhagen report naval fighting off the coast of Denmark RUMBLE OF REPORTED HEARD AMSTERDAM rum ble of guns in an undetermined direction could be heard plainly in Amsterdam Tuesday Two incidents of foreign planes flying over the Netherlands dur ing the night were reported offi cially In the first instance antiair craft batteries south of Amster at the unidentified dam fired planes In an apparently unrelated case more than 50 shots were fired over n SBminute period about 5 a m It was not reported whether any hits were made Its Mutual BERLIN UR The govern ment announced Tuesday that German soldiers on the Siegfried line and French soldiers on the Magmot line have painted signs on their pill boxes within view of one another reading We wont shoot if you dont shoot Right to Prevail Chamberlain States LONDON Minister Chamberlain telegraphed Premier Daladicr of France Tuesday that he was confident right will pre vail in the conflict with Germany U S LIMITS ACTS OF CITIZENS IN EUROPE GERMANS DENY SHOTS FIRED ON WESTERN LINES Assert Katowice and Chorzow Have Fallen as Troops Progress BERLIN Germany Tuesday announced capture of two rich Polish industrial cities Katowice arul near the PolishGerman fron tier in Silesia Both towns on the direct route to Krakow Polands ancient capital virtually had been surrounded by previous attacks where the German border bulges into southwestern Poland but the final thrust against them had been delayed Germans had said they feared the Poles would blow up mines and steel rolling mills which they said were mined with explosives but the Poles were said to have been surprised and fled without damaging the valuable property Capture of the two towns would give Germany control Iy dustrial A United States concern the American Silesian company owns the socalled HarrimanGiesche zinc mines at Katowice At the same time German au thorities declared 10 British bomb ers had been shot down Monday when they raided he German fleet at Wilhelmshafen and Cux haven near the entrance to the strategic Kiel canal Revising their previous state ment that live of 12 British raid ers were destroyed German offi cials said more than half of the at tackers were downed and declared no damage was done to nazi war ships despite British statements to the contrary In London officials claimed severe damage was inflicted on two German battleships by the British raiders Germany reported capture of two Silesian cities as Adolf Hit ler the rcichs first soldier followed his troops across the Polish corridor and the German news ogency announced tri umphantly that East Prussia had been reunited with Germany proper In addition to capturing Kato wice and Chorzow Germany of ficially reported the destruction of 11 Polish planes in an air battle Tuesday between Lodz and War saw Lodz is midway between the German frontier and the Polish capital Germany claimed to have crushed the entire seventh Polish army division southeast of Czesto chowa which was captured two days ago on the Silesian front The division staff officers were said to have been taken prisoner A divi sion usually is 10000 to 15000 men Besides Poles now isolated between German lines and the Baltic in the northern part of the corridor as a result of ihe German sweep to the Vistula river 13000 Polish prisoners were rounded up thus far in southwestern Poland The agency said the fuehrer joined his army of the east at Kulm on the Vistula river near the border of East Prussia while steps were taken in Berlin to strengthen the nation for war now in both the east and west The supreme army command announced that contrary to for eign reports not a single shot had been tired on the westrn front up to Sept 5 9 a m 2 a m Likewise there have been no air attacks except the reported Eng lish raids at Wilhelmshafen and Cuxhaven A dispatch from Paris time a m a m CST Tues day said German planes had in vaded France to start air opera tions on the western front while scattered fighting took place be tween the opposed armies on the Rhineland US Stocks and Grains Skyrocket NEW YORK Wall street experienced an unprecedented war boom Tuesday ii stocks of cor porations and in raw materials ex pected to supply the vast needs of the European conflict Stocks shot up 51 to more than a share in the most frantic trading seen in the stock exchange in the past few years Orders for raw staples such as metals textiles and chemicals were poured into dealers offices in such volume that many found it impossible to decide upon price schedules Brokers said there was no day like it in the war boom of 1915 and 1916 when booming stocks were called war brides and war babies Wall street scenes were reminis cent of 1029 Brokers offices were crowded and the visitors gallery of the stock exchange was thronged Grains in Chicago spurted the limit September rubber on which there is no fluctuation limit rose 5BO points or a pound Xarrjt Yorlrby With drawn on spoV copperj lead and zinc Scrap copper spurted 34 cent a pound Cotton gained al most a bale The London stock exchange re opened unexpectedly with restrict tions on price swings and prices quoted for cash A sizable crowd attended and some dealings were done by telephone German bonds broke sharply Police stopped trading in the London street mar ket BOMB BERLIN PARIS Polish radio announced Tuesday that Polish planes had bombed Berlin Tuesday and had returned to Warsaw with out loss The Polish radio also said German planes had bombarded Warsaw and caused several cas ualties Seven of the German planes were shot down the radio stated STATE 2ND NAZI SHIP IS SUNK British State Olinda and Fritzen Are Sent to Bottom of Sea LONDON were received here Tuesday that in ad dition to the German steamer Olinda sunk off Brazil by the Brit ish cruiser Ajax the German steamer Carl Fritzen has been sunk The manner of the sinking or locality was not given but the crew of the Carl Fritzen was re ported safe The Carl Fritzen is of 6504 tons and its home port is Em den Sub Sinks Cunard Line Ship LIVERPOOL England The Cunard line announced Tues day that its steamer Bosnia had been sunk by a sumbarine and her crew of 23 rescued by a Norwegian tanker A message from the 2407 ton Bosnia interrupted before com pletion gave her position as about 100 miles off the Scottish coast The tanker uas reported proceed ing to Lisbon with the rescued One death aboard the Bosnia was reported that of a fireman named Woods The Bosnia was set abliuc by gunfire and then torpedoed the company announced THOUSANDS OF POLES OTHERS FLEE WARSAW Rush to Interior Beyond Reach of Nazi Armies Planes WARSAW sands of Poles and several hundred foreigners including most of the Americans re maining here left this Polish capital city Tuesday fleeing into the interior beyond the reach of German armies and German planes There were reports hat officials of the government itself might leave within a few hours Anthony J Drexel Biddle Jr the United States ambas sador his family and most of his staff left during the day in a motor caravan flying American flags They headed for an undisclosed spot where Biddle proposed to continue functioning as nearly normal ly as possible occu pied the extra seats iri the Biddle caravanAs it was getting under way bomb explosions and the roar of the craft heard in tlie dis tance Landreth M Harrison second secretary remained here in charge of the embassy Harrison and what staff was left for him planned to stay on in the embassy premises Several American newspaper men left with the Caravan Lloyd Lahrbas of the Associated Press is remaining in Warsaw for the tune being Other Associated Press correspondents left to cover the embassy and other noints Several times during the morn ing attack the German airmen flew directly over the heart of the capital without dropping bombs They confined their activities to the suburbs and military objec tives The alarm sounded at a m a m CST and 35 minutes later the all clear signal was given The courses traveled by at tacking planes caused observers to conclude they were shuttling hack and forth between Austria Slovak and otlier German areas m daily trips reloading at each stop and dropping bombs cn route The Polish press reported a Po lish cavalry unit had penetrated the German East Prussian border and occupied two villages This was similar to an earlier report that Polish mounted troops had broken through Germanys Silesian frontier north of Breslau Several fires were visible Tues day on the outskirts of the capi tal as the resuU of ah bombs which fell just after 11 a m 4 a m Dull rumbles apparently orig inating several miles away were heard in the city Throughout the morning the firing of antiaircraft pieces were heard every few minutes but there was no official information on their action and it was impos sible to ascertain the exact situation Captain States Sub Sank Ship Deny Plan to Split Poland With Russia BERLIN declared Tuesday Germany has no agree ment with soviet Russia for par tition of Poland All we want is what we have won they said Their attitude was that Germany wanted to pick no further quarrel with France and Britain LOSES FOOT IN MISHAP HUMBOLDT Col lins of Livermore lost one foot as a result of a collision between the motorcycle he was riding and an automobile The mangled member was amputated shortly after the accident Sunday night JJ CAPT JAMES COOK My Ship Was Struck by a Torpedo GALWAY Ireland master of the stricken British liner Athenia sunk Sunday said on his arrival here Monday that his ship was hit by a torpedo which wenl through the galley and into the engine room causing heavy less o The captain James Cook was brought here by the Norwegian steamer Knut Nelson with 430 other survivors of the first sub marine disaster of the European war In Berlin Monday night State Secretary Ernst von Weizsaeckei told Alexander Kirk American charge daffaires German sea forces could not possibly have been responsible Strict orders have been issued for the German sea forces to hold themselves within the prize John Cudahy United States minister to Ireland watched the transfer of the rescued passengers from the Norwegian ship to the tender which brought them ashore Among the rescued was Dr John Kirk of Boston Mass who said my wife was killed in the explosion and all I want to know now is whether my two children who were traveling with us are safe Captain Cook said that imme diately after the torpedo was fired the submarine rose to the surface and shelled the Athenia One shell carried away the main mast he related It was evidently aimed at the wireless room but missed its mark He called witnesses to tell news paper men that the torpedo fired at a range of SCO to 1 000 yards on the port side of the vessel One officersaidhe saw the periscope of the submarine just before the torpedo struck Other officers and members of the crew said they saw a line of smoke rising from the water ofi the port side just before the dis aster The smoke described a com plete circle over the surface of the water Captain Cook said he did not know how many were dead and injured The captain added there was no panic whatever on board the ship The passengers faced daneer bravely The Weather FORECAST IOWA Partly cloudy to cloudy Tuesday night and Wednesday warmer Tuesday night and cast and south Wednesday MINNESOTA Unsettled Tues day night and Wednesday prob ably scattered showers north Portion warmer east and south Tuesday nisht and extreme southeast and along Lake Su perior Wednesday cooler Wed nesday IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather figure Maximum Monday 73 Minimum Monday night 50 At 8 a m Tuesday 70 YEAR AGO Maximum 53 Minimum Bain A6 NEUTRALITY IS PROCLAIMED IN ACTION OF F R Embargo on Implements of War to Be Issued Following Conference WASHINGTON President Roosevelt p r o ilaimecl American neutrality Tuesday He signed and Secretary Hull countersigned a pro clamation of over 4000 words establishing an ex tensive list of regulations designed to keep Americans from projecting the United States into the European war Another proclamation to be issued under the 1937 neu trality act was scheduled for consideration at a white house conference later in the after noon It will put in operation an embargo on exports of amis ammunition and im plements of war to the com batant nation In the first proclamation issued under acts of 1909 and 1917 the presidentsaidYthat state of war tweenvGermany and land and the United Kingdom India Australia and New Zealand And whereas the United States is on terms of friendship and am ity with the contending powers and with the persons inhabiting their several dominions x x x And whereas it is the duty a neutral government not to per mit or suffer the making of its territory or territorial waters sub servient to the purposes of war Now therefore I Franklin D Roosevelt president of the United States of America in order to pre serve the neutrality of the United States and of its citizens and of persons within its territory and jurisdiction and to enforce its laws and treaties and in order that all persons being warned of the general tenor of the laws and treaties of the United States in this behalf and of the law of na tions may thus be prevented from any violation of the same do here by declare and proclaim that by certain provisions of the act ap proved on the fourth day of March A D 1909 commonly known as the penal code of the United States and of the act ap proved on the fifteenth day of June A D 1017 the following acts are forbidden to be done un der severe penalties within the territory and jurisdiction of the United States Seven closely written mimeo graphed pages of prohibitions and restrictions thereupon followed They forbade Accepting and exercising a com mission to serve one of the bel ligerents Enlisting in the service of a bel ligerent as a soldier marine or seaman aboard any warship Hiring or retaining another per son so to enlist Hiring another person to go out side the United States for this purpose Hiring another person to go outside the United States with the intent to be entered into service Retaining another person to go outside the United States to be enlisted Retaining another person to go outside the United States with in tent to be entered into service The president said this did not extened to the citizen of a bel ligerent who shall enlist in the service of his country or hire an other fellow citizen to do the same Fitting out and arming any ship or vessel to be used in the service of a belligerent Issuing or delivering a commis sion for any such ship Increasing the force of a bel ligerent warship by adding to her guns or their calibre Setting on foot any military or nruil expedition to start from the United States against a belligerent Sending out any vessel to carry on n belligerent warship fuel arms ammunition men supplies dispatches or information Dispatching from the United Stales any armed vessel to be used   

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