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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: August 18, 1939 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - August 18, 1939, Mason City, Iowa                             NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME HARLON ft H 1ST UCU 4 tRT PCPT OF IOWA COMP ces UOIHCS NEWSPAPER THAT WAKES AU NORTH 10WANS NEIGHBORS MASON CITY IOWA jfJRIDAY AUGUST MAJON CITY kTHl BRIGHT SPOT By B Confessions of a Washington Writer Confes sions of a Washington Columnist would not be good material for True Detective Mysteries They would fit more comfortably into the Princeton Quarterly Review I have read letters and articles tor the past few years depicting the news be hind the news writer here as a p u r v e y or of falsehoods p r o p a gandist maligner oi character e a v e sdropper wiretapper and practically ev erything except what he is sup posed to Paul Mallon reporter The miscon ceptions have increased since one minor politician denounced as 100 per cent all time prevaricators the newswriters who failed to repre sent his partisan viewpoint These following are my ideas of it They are purely personal and should not be taken as re flecting the views of any other column living or dead No Eavesdropping Keyhole journalism does not exist here It never did never will If anyone had a mind to try it he would not succeed The key holes are too well secret service men capitol police departmental guards I have never known of an important transom being left open at any critical mo ment Nor is eavesdropping consid ered any better form here than elsewhere There is a sort of un written law against it stronger than any statute The 500 men who make up the Washington adopted it silently not because they are magnanimous butTJecause to know wilt stand up does not come from over heard conversations The average Washington official conversation outside the white house is just not worth overhearing If there are dictaphones here they are not in the hands of the press If any telephone wires are being tapped the tappers are within officialdom No one outside has the facilities which exist in several government departments for such work Secrets Protected Contrarily there are daily in stances in which the press pro tects officials from inadvertent disclosures of government secrets I know many cases where re porters have seen letters left ly ing around on government desks and overheard telephone conver sations conducted in their pres ence by government officials dur ing interviews It is not custom ary for reporters to take advan tage of information so gained It might mean the loss of a job to the incautious official It would certainly mean the loss of a news source to a reporter and news sources are the bread and butter by which newsmen live and the people of a democracy learn what is going on An understanding of mutual confidence exists between source and reporter which must be main tained if fair news is to be sus tained on a continuous basis to the people It is never violated by statesmen or newsmen only rarely by politicians Reason for Column News behind the news comes here from the conflict that is poli tics aad it comes under unwritten ethical laws No man here knows all the answers Noone here can find out but if a reporter will apply himself to developing as many as he can he will find the democratic political system en couraging to his efforts There are always people here on either side of every question willing to talk straight if they are not quoted But you may say how does this columns material then differ from the general run of news paper news from Washington The difference is not great Regu lar reporters are concerned with recording swiftly moving surface events News behind the news often calls for more personal judg ment as to whom and what to be lieve than it is possible for news papers to grant to all their re porters But the most important point is that sources of much of the best news must necessarily re main anonymous Column mate rial must be stated upon the per sonal responsibility of the column lot Copyright Kim Fejlarej Inc MAN 92 KILLS SELF ISEW YORK Nuss baum 92 couldnt wait to die in a normal manner He killed him self with a pisto He leaves a wife who is 82 TtflS PAPEK CONSISTS OF TWO SECTIONS SECTION ONE NO 267 GIRL SAYS BUND CAMP IMMORAL GOOD WEATHER CONTINUES FOR CROWDS IN FAIR Total Attendance Is Near 70000 for Last Day of Exposition The sixth straight day of sunny weather Friday promised to boost total attendance at the North Iowa fair to near the 70000 mark far above that in any recent years ac cording to official figures released by the association The attendance for the first five days was reported as 58 721 as compared with 51770 for the cor responding period of 1938 The first three days of the week piled up a considerable lead over last years figures while Wednesday and Thursday fell approximately 100 per day below the 1838 The official attendance figures 1939 1S38 Sunday 14443 10308 Monday 7258 6778 Tuesday 9690 7106 Wednesday 15494 15581 Ihursday 1183G 11097 TOTALS 58721 51770 The 1939 exposition closes Fri day evening with the final show ing of the outdoor musical ex travaganza Under the Stars and the ThearleDuffield fire works display Highest price paid at the 4H baby beef sale Friday morninr was 20 cents a pound for a Hereford steer owned by Dean Strand son of Sir and Mrs Os car Strand of Manly The steer weighed 1000 pounds and was purchased by the Northwest Savings bank Mason City SecondTugETvas bought by the Ideal Sand and Gravel company from John Han son Mason City for 14V cents a FRIDAY EVENING p in grandstand by Mason City Municipal band under direction of Professor Carleton Stewart p grand perform ance of Ernie Youngs Under the Stars musical revue featur ing the California Varsity Eight Car Freed and His Harmonica Lads the Gould Sisters Dun cans Collies Betty Heed Wil liam and Joe Mandel the Six Gretonas and Hollywood danc ing chorus Fairly and Little Shows on the midway pound and weighing Dean Strand also owned the calf bringing the third highest price 14 cents a pound It was pur chased by the Farmers Savings bank of Plymouth A steer owned by Richard Dunn was sold to the United Home Bank and Trust company for 13 V cents a pound and another owned by the same boy to the North western Distributing company Mason City for 13 cents a pound Other prices ranged downward from 11 cents a pound More than 120 steers were sold if Six couples in flic Golden Jubi lee club married 50 years or longer were honored at the fair Thursday The couples and the number of years married were Mr and Mrs 1JL Graham 713 Carolina ave nue southeast 52 years Mr and So You Follow the Fire Truck Algona police and firemen pulled a trick on had antidPated and planned for severa mnfi Wednesday night induced some 200 local motorists to follow the fire truck after long weary blasts of the fire siren The trucks hastened to the fairgrounds where a pile of old tires had been set on fire in the most distant corner of the grounds Nobodv stopped drivers as they followed the trucks into the grounds ue inside police Presented them with tagsremindine them they had violated both city and state laws by following the Mrs G O Heinselman Plymouth 51 years Mr and Mrs C I Bitt ner Nora Springs 50 years F M Smith 1428 Monroe avenue north west 56 years Mr and Mrs George Palmer 6 Monroe avenue southwest 50 years and Mr and Mrs Frank Pirkl 148 Eighth street southwest 50 years C H Spencer president of the club accompanied the group The Thompson brothers of Pe ona 111 presented a balloon as cension and parachute jump A group of vaudeville acts filled the remainder of the afternoon pro gram K Approximately 1000 persons in cluding 85 outoftown Globe Gazette carrier salesmen and their parents witnessed the grandstand program The carrier salesmen were guests of the fair following a luncheon at the Y M C A and tours through the GlobeGazette office and radio station KGLO Three heat victories for Miss M k southern Iowa mare clinched final harness racing hon kS 11 program of the fair Thursday A single free completed the Again driving a winner Art Berry of Fort Dodge brought the and Miller entry home in h Wln the heat shading the former local track rec ord which was lowered to 205M meeting1116 day Bid McKenzie drove T D Van to a pair of close second places in the early heats but the LaCrosse Wis gelding pulled up lame af ter the late turn and was drawn John McCoys Hyland Volo from Lancaster Wis took second place in the final heat of the added event Boy Who Fled From Dentists Office Is Found BOSTON ffJEleven year old William Kennedy sought since he fled a dentists forceps Thursday returned home Friday tired and bedraggled after roaming the Police ended a which had extended throughout greater Boston after William bolt ed from a dentists office fearful of having three teeth extracted The Weather FORECAST IOWA Fair Friday night and Saturday slightly warmer southwest Friday night and southeast and extreme east Sat urday MINNESOTA Generally fair Friday night and Saturday ex cept scattered showers north west Saturday warmer tiorlh ccntral Friday night cooler northcentral ana extreme west Saturday IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics maximum Thursday m Minimum Thursday night 5S At 8 a m Friday 74 YEAR AGO Maximum gg Minimum 53 LOOK INSIDE FOR MAXIE ROSENBLOOM Slayer of Language Is Looking for Wife PAGE 2 Kossuth Fair Opens at Algona Saturday PAGE 8 Heart Wins nes in National League Cnase PAGE 9 PARTY LINES SEEN IN FEASTS Thanksgiving to Be Observed by Most of U S Same Day as F R NEW YORK majority of Americans will eat Thanksgiv ing dinners on the same day as President Roosevelt a nationwide survey showed Friday but the feasting will be largely along party lines A poll showed that 25 govern democrats and five repub decided to follow the presidents example in proclaim ng the holiday on Nov 23 a week earlier than the traditional last Thursday in November Thirteen governors among them 10 republicans and three demo crats said Thanksgiving in theii states would be observed on Nov 30 Governors of 10 states were either undecided or not ready to announce their decisions ENGLISH HEAD RESIGNS AMES J Raymond Derby head of the Iowa State college English department since 1929 resigned to accept a position as professor of English at Ohio State university Columbus Ohio City farm youth was given the award Tfor vinnins second conles sponsored Internationa and a T1 r na check fo Charles BITTER POLISH ATTACKS MADE IN NAZI PRESS Germany Warns of Settlement of Danzig Within Few Days By UNITED PRESS Germanys quarrel with Poland reached the stage Friday of a violent press campaign against Polish atrocities on Germans and nazi warnings that settlement of the Danzig problem is now possibly a matter of days The most significant attack was contained m the Essen Nationa Zeitung personal organ of Fielc Marsha Hermann Wilhelm Goer ing nazi No 1 which stated that the Polish government is no longer m a position to control the situati6n in upper Silesia The implication was that the reich will have to protect the German minority in the Polish Province The inspired press under screaming headlines described also the terrorism against the German Danzig majority and in dicated that it might be necessary for Germany to intervene No hint was given as tothe na ture of the intervention Poland professed to be un daunted by the German attacks The Polish press and politica quarters declared Poland will fight if attacked or if there is violence in Danzig There was every Indication that Britain and France are deter mined to fight with Poland if Danzig is seized by force The danger of a general war thus de pended on whether Germany maintains her adamantdemand for the return of Danzig and the Polish corridor without com promise and Poland holds to her steadfast refusal to surrender either Point was given to Britains at titude when she started the final drafting of a binding military alliance with Poland replacing the temporary guarantee given after the dismemberment of CzechoSlovakia Then last March 31 Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain an nounced In the event of any action which clearly threatened Polish independence and which the Pol ish government accordingly con sidered it vital to resist with their national forces his majestys gov ernment would feel themselves bound at once to lend the Polish government all support in their power The proposed new pact is much more specific and binding As re ported in London it would be ef fective for five years It would concern not only direct but in direct aggression against Poland ties is an attack on neighboring states which Poland would con sider a menace to her security Also it was stated Britain would give an unprecedented guarantee to assist Poland if a foreign Ger to dominate her economic life The Rome press was far milder in tone than the German but in timated that Italy would be on Germanys side in any general conflict over Danzig The papers expressed the belief that the sit uation is reaching itr climax Negotiators Confer in Des Moines Strike DES MOINES in the strike of a group of building service employes at the Younkers brothers store here resumed de liberations Friday after the first plan for settlement was rejected by the strikers Thursday The pro posal for settlement of the strike instituted a compromise between the unions demand for a closed shop or a modified closed shop and the companys request for an open shop negotiators said Milk Dumped in Boycott Striking dairy farmers dumped this milk near Buskirk N Y the New York Dairy Farmer union pushed its boycott aeainst New York City market in an attempt to boost prices t as against the STATE POLICE CONVOY TRUCKS One Third Shortage in New York Milk Needs Is Predicted UT1CA N Y po lice who Friday began convoy ing supply trucks in New Yorks strifetorn milk strike area re ported the situation well under control but a onethird shortage oE New York Citys normal milk needs was predicted Major John A Warner super intendent of state police said be tween 200 and 250 troopers under orders of Gov Herbert H Leh han were patrolling highways in the disturbance zones to prevent interference with transportation of milk after outbreaks Thurs day He asserted troopers have had few requests for aid today William Gandall of New York ity a representative of the Con gress of Industrial Organizations said ali members of the CIO in he state estimated at 70000 riave been requested to boycott Shetfield and Borden dairies and other companies not signed up with the union Parity Prices Given as Recovery Key at eMars Mass Meeting LE MARS W aroviding for parity prices is the cey to economic recovery and de crease of unemployment in the opinion of 1500 farmers laborers and businessmen who attended a mass meeting here Thursday The group adopted a resolution asserting it is imperative that Jarity treatment in the matter of tariffs and prices for products of American farms forests and nines and parity wages for la or as compared with prices of nanufactured goods be definitely ncorporated into American law The meeting was conducted by Representative Gustave Alesch state representative from Ply mouth county Hibernation Treatment to Be Given lowan for Cancer OTTUMWA Harlan 42 Stockport Iowa farmer will carry his fight against cancer of Ihe pancreas to Temple univer ity at Philadelphia where he will be the first lowan to undergo the new hibernation treatment Harlan will leave Saturday with Jr p L Nelson Ottumwa At emple he will place his life in the hands of experimenting doctors Monday his body be packed in ice and the temperature low ered to 89 degrees He will remain thus for five days showing no visible signs of life Doctors who introduced the treatment at the American Medi cal society convention in St Louis last May said the treatment has proved successful on skin cancer but little is known of its eftect on internal disease as in Harlans case MISS HANSON HURT IN WRECK Companion of Local Girl Killed in Auto Mishap Near Dunbar Marjorie Hanson 21 daughter of Mr and Mrs C A Hanson W Taylor avenue northwest was seriously injured Friday in an ac cident in which her companion David S Miller 21 of Wilmette 111 was killed Hospital attendants at Marshall town reported that allhough Miss Hansons condition was serious her injuries were not critical She surfered a chest injury and pos sible broken collarbone Miller died when his car and a gravel truck driven by L T Baker of Newton collided on a narrow r mear Dunbar south of arshalltown Friday morning f Scrgt Clarence Day of the State highway patrol saW his in vestigation showed Baker failed to KIVC the Miller car the right of way and that he might file charges against he gravel truck driver late Friday V Miss Hanson was graduated Mason City high school in jyjs and from Grinnell college at Gnnnell last spring She had to visit friends at Grinnell Thursday Mr and Mrs Hanson lefUmmediately for Marshalltown tnday after being notified of the accident Mr Hanson is assistant secretary and purchasing agent of the Northwestern States Portland Lement company IMARJORIE HANSON ThDio by Jean Marsh Wright TSni CONVICT CAUGHT JOLIET Em merson 37 one of two convicts who overpowered a prison guard and escaped Wednesday vas seized at RockCord 111 Friday STATES LIFE OF HITLER STUDIED BY BOYS GIRLS Surprise Witness Was Disgusted by Activities in Movement WASHINGTON A Nineteen year old Helen Vooros told the Dies commit tee Friday that there was immorality in a German American bund camp on Long Island N Y and that she quit the bund because the leaders wouldnt let me alone They planned o attack me the plump darkhaired bund youth leader added in an almost inaudible tone The immorality of the en tire movement appalled you Representative Starnes D Ala put in starting a question It disgusted me she said cut ting Starnes off Earlier she said bund leaders attempted to inculcate the camp ers with the idea that nazi prin ciples far superior to Ameri can institutions and ideals They said she testified that national socialism the party of Hitler in Germany was the only Was Taught F R Had Jewish Blood WASHINGTON Vooros 19 year old Brooklyn eul told the Dies committee Friday that the propaganda school In Germany vidt ing American young men women that President Roosevelt had a streak of Jewish blood thing that could save us I dont know what we were going to be saved from They said we Germans werent getting consideration in this coun try and it was about time we spoke up The leaders she said re quired bund youth to study the life of Hillcr from pamphlets which came from Germany Miss Vooros Germanborn and was called as a surprise wit ness by the house committee in vestigating unAmerican activities m its attempt to link the bund with nazi propaganda agencies In a black dress piped with white and speaking in calm tones she related how in a south Brook lyn bund unit girls in her group were examined as to their know ledge after the study of Hitler Chairman Dies D Texas said me had been requested to withhold the witness until she started testifying in or der to prevent any demonstra tion Her testimony committee officials announced would be of fered in reply to some of the statements by Fritz Kuhn bund eader whose twoday examina tion was finished Thursday Miss Vooros a former Brooklyn orf Th told the committee of her experi ences with the bund affiliate She an m an American citizen Martin Jexas to tell of condi tions in the girls camp which was a boys said The boys and girls did things they shouldnt do Miss Vooros testified that siie became leader of the girls youth fhter the dcath Koch the former leader Miss Koch died she said n pneumonia contracted because she stayed up at night to guard the ins camp which was near the boys camp She said complaints about this caused the leader of the youth movement a Mr Dinkelachcr to hold a meeting Mr Dinkelacher told us to go where people couldnt sec us she said But Hitler in Mcin Kampf is ainst immorality Dies said ag But thats what they call pure Miss Vooros said When two people go together and they don t curb their natural instincts lhats pure Chairman Dies announced the committee would attempt to weed out immaterial and unessential nformation He said witnesses would be cautioned against vol untary statements Miss Vooros testified that she came to the United States in 1926 entering at New York She joined the South Brooklyn division of   

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