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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: April 26, 1937 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - April 26, 1937, Mason City, Iowa                                NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME HOME EDITION THI NIWSPAPIR THAT ALL NORTH IOWANS NSIGHBORS VOL XLIH FIVE CENTS A COPY ASSOCIATED PRESS AMD UNITED PRESS JPUIJ LEASED WIRES MASON CITY IOWA MONDAY APRIL THIS PAPEB CONSISTS or TWO SECTION ONE NO 171 Neutrality Is Difficult Students of Situation Generally Pessimistic HOUSE HEARS WALKOUT THREAT By CHARLES P STEWART VSH IN G T O N CPA outlook for sat isfactory legis lation to keep the United States neutral in the next ma jor war is not very good Students of the situation generally are pessimistic They prac tically are in agreement that all plans thus far suggested promise to in v o 1 v e Uncle Sam in such a struggle rather than to keep him clear of it On the one hand Shall tne neutrality rule be made absolute ly inflexible If so some situa tion may arise which the rule absolutely wont fit our policy will be utterly unadaptable to cir cumstances and we will become unneutral involuntarily Discretion to Manaeers On the opposite hand Shall a certain discretion be allowed to the managers of our affairs That discretion cannot but be sufficient to permit our government to de cide that the time has come when neutrality no longer is which is what happened on the last occasion neutral as we thought we were at first Treaties and compacts and armament limitation agreements are talked about They dont work There was a regular epidemic of them for several years following the world conflict All of have fizzled out Disarmament Ineffective The only thingwhich could pre vent nations from clashing would be a disinclination on their re spective peoples part to fight Disarmament cant be made effec tive Primitive weapons always are available if socalled modern equipment has fallenintoobsolesr cense Wars antedate even tun powder Nor is there any longer a dis position to let modem equipment lapseTo the contrary it is being improved on all the while We oldsters make the mistake of thinking that the current gener ation into which we have lived and of which we assume that ws still are a major part does not wanta war Theoretically the youngsters do not but actually each generation does feel an urge toward a war of its own No War Knowledge We the oldsters have had ours So far as were concerned Never a2And we imagme that we still authoritatively Heck Millions of youths of mil itary their sisters were not born in 1914 Millions more were in their cradles grand parents think they think as we do Its doubtful that were in so rouci as a majority at the polls today These kidlets dont know what a wars like They dont realize that present economic problems affecting them are leftovers from the last war They have an ab stract idea that war is a bad thong thats all I was here in Washington when President Hoover was chasing the bonus marchers out of the capital Believe me those boys were cured as to war But that was nearly 10 years ago and the bonus marchers were aging even then What do their sons care Cant Be Passed on Experience cant be passed from generation to generation There are optimistic folk who think the world has more sense now than it the few years preceding 1914 I lived in Europe at that time It was obvious that a war was impending The prospect could be figured out approximately as it developed It looked logical One could tell almost what the program would be But every one said While its inevitable it wont ensue were all too civil What ensued Is this pessimistic Ill say so Farmers Help Put Out Blaze at Judd FORT DODGE by a score of farmers Webster City and Fort Dodge firemen put out a fire that threatened to destroy the L E Baughman home and stock barns and the North Iowa Grain companys elevator at Judd near here The fire destroyed a feed mixing plant poultry houses and hens and baby chicks Roosevelt Aets to Avert Eastern Rail Strike CHOOSESBOARD TOTRYTOWORK OUTAGREEMENT CarnegieIllinois Steel to Abide by Rules of Wagner Law By TJNITED PRESS President Roosevelt invoked his executive authority Monday to avert a threatened strike of eastern railroad employes Mr Roosevelt appointed a three man board to investigate the labor controversy between the eight eastern major rail lines and rail labor organizations The threatened walkout ac cording to federal law must be delayed while the presidential committee investigates carrier worker differences and reports to the white house within 30 days Names of the three persons to sit on the board were not immedi ately announced Will Not Interfere The CarnegieIllinois Steel company assured the national la bor relations board that it would not interfere with labor organiza tion efforts of its employes under the Wagner law and would dis establish its relations with the company union plan of represen tation Three labor controversies held the center of interest on the west coast At Banning CaL tee Organization clasheckwith the American Feder ation of Labor over which organi zation should aqueduct workers at Parker dam At Oakland Cat theUnited Automobile Workers a C 0 affiliate claimed a victory in its campaign to organize the Forfi Motor company after gain ing commissions at the Richmond assembly plant Three Labor Groups At Stockton three labor Federation of Labor Stockton Cannery Workers union and Modesto Cannery Workers claimed the right to represent workers in arbitrating a dispute in the canning factories which caused a riot last week The newly organized American Labor League in Detroit began its attach on the C I expres sing hope it would be abletohold the balance of power between the C I O and the A F O U A W meanwhile sought to ex tend its drive to represent all automobile workers Possibility of Election In Pittsburgh the C I O clashed with the A F O L in the campaign to organize workers in the Westinghouse Electric Man ufacturing Company plant There was a possibility of an employe election to determine which or ganization should represent work ers In Oshawa Ontario more than employes prepared to re turn to work in the General corporation of Canada plant closed since April 8 by a strike calledby the U A W National guardsmen continued to patrol the shoe factory district of Auburn where federal con ciliators sought to end a month old strike Mason City Baseball Game Is Rained Out Mason City highs baseball game with Austin on the Minnesota diamond was rained out Saturday The date for the postponed game hasnot been let Wind Demolishes North Iowa Buildings Restore Service After Iowa Storm REPAIR WIRES ROADS CLEARED BYSNOWPLOWS North lowans in many com munities Monday were clear ins debris and repairing dam age left by Friday nirhts wind storm Ruins of a barn on the Sever Hermauson farm 2 miles north of Lcland are shown in the above photograph Three cows and a horse were killed in the barn but icveral head of other livestock escaped injury when the Tarn collapsed At ttKCrifht portions of the damagedfencewhichsur parkat Forest City The fence erected list summer was demolished Parts of the grandstand were also damared by the storm Photos by Lock Kayenay en Oklahoma Takes Up Case of 2 Sisters Married Under Age PERRY ma which approves the marriages of children of 15 with the par ents consent Monday took up the case of Opal and Jewellen West who County Attorney Hudson Pierce said were only 12 and 14 years old They were rharrieoS to adult neighbors last week in a double ceremony The mother Mrs Mary West was said to have condoned the marriages She had been work ing in a WPA sewing room to support the two girls and usual ly accompanied Opal and her suitor John Lawrence Burns 38 on their dates to picture shows Both Mrs West and Burns were held in jail on perjury charges They are bonds Pierce he would question Jewellens husband Howard Carter 35yearold oil worker would charge him with perjury The elder sister was still with her new husband Pierce said they all swore that Opal was 15 and Jewellen 17 or CHARGED WITH SLAYING YOUTH Shooting Follows Family Conference When Wife Asks Divorce CHICAGO Wil leford 32 faced a murder charge Monday for killing a youth who won the love of his wife after a Jong friendship which he had con doned Willeford shot Charles Truchan 21 to death after a family con ference in which Mrs Willeford asked for a divorce so she could marry Truchan It was the end of a friendship which began five years ago when the Willefords hired Truchan a high school youth of 16 to care for their three children Satisfactory to Him Two years ago Truchan began to accompany Mrs Willeford out for evenings when Willeford pre ferred to stayat home The ar rangement apparently was satis factory to Willeford Truchan and Mrs Willeford fell in love however as a result of their frequent companionship On Easter Mrs Willeford left ier husband andon April 17 she filed suit for divorce Willeford wrote a letter asking her to meet him and dis cuss matters Truchan accompan ied her to the Willeford home Sunday Willeford pleaded for them to give up thair plans They refused Whips Out Gui We get TruT chan toid Willeford whipped out a gun and shot Truchan four times as he fled from the room He asked his wife to call police but she fled instead with her three children Sam 11 Jack 9 and Flons 8 Neighbors summonedvpohce Theft of Cash at Davenport Probed Mon day investigated the theft of ap proximately in cash from ieon Bantr of Iowa City while he and his wife were visiting at thehome of Mr and Mrs W H McRoberts The money which was in a box in a traveling bag was missed late Sunday night when the Bauers and McRoberts couples returned from a visit to friends Bauer isa commercial auditor operates the Merchants Ser vice company of St Louis North Iowa Farmers Survey Damage to Buildings by Wind Northwestern Iowa telephone power company and state high way maintenance crews at work since Saturday noon Monday made progress in restoring order after the springs most severe snowstorm Snowplows cleared highways in various points in western and Rebels Blast Wide Path on BilbaoDrive By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Insurgents cut a wide path through Basque defenses Monday and occupied strategic communication center only four miles from Durahgo gateway to Bilbao Capture of the town cut off Durango from the Eibar sectorto the east Government railroad lines were severed The Basques are in headlong an insurgent communique said Basque dispatches to Hendaye on the FrancoSpanish border Monday said government militia men have set fire to the town of Eibar arid turned it into a vast before evacuating in the face of northern insurgent ad vances against both Bil bao To Occupy Ruins The troops of Gen Francisco various points in northern Iowa where several nun Franco in a new drive against the dred automobiles were abandoned Basque capital expected to occupy in the drifts by motorists when the wet clinging snow drifted as high as eight feet in some places Primghar hotels were filled Sunday with motorists who left their stalled cars on the highways when the city was isolated by snowdrifts At Sioux City Sunday more than telephoneswere out of order and 183 long distance cir cuits were out of commission company officials said Power company officials there reported 183 line breaks Aid to Farmers Sioux City bureau readings showed 1158 inches of precipitatiotfsincethe the moisture totalvtp inches more than the amount for the corres ponding period a year as sured farmers ofneeded subsoil Northwestern the ruins of Eibar one of SpanVs principal arms manufacturing towns Tuesday Occupation of Verriz vital communication center already had cut off Durango key city to Bilbao from Eibar which is a short distance to the east Durango is 13 miles southeast of Bilbao Sir Henry Chilton British am bassador to Spain now in Hendaye was ordered by London to protest toinsurgent Gen Francisco Franco against interference of hiswarships with British vessels which took foodto besiegedBU The Weather FORECAST IOWA Mostly cloudy Mon day nijrht and Tuesday prob ably light showers in central and cast portions Monday night continued frost Monday night should sky clear MINNESOTA Cloudy to part ly cloudy Monday night and Tuesday somewhat wanner Tuesday in west portion IN MASON CITY GloberGaiette weather figures for 24 hour period ending at 8 oclock Monday morning Maximum Sunday Minimum in Night 37 At 8 A M Monday 37 Rainfall 06 of an Inch Figures periodending at 8 oclock Sunday morning Maximum Saturday 48 Minimum in Nifht 34 Hainfall 18 of an Inch Last of Lilliputian Midget Troupe Dies of Age Loneliness FORT WAYNE Old age and loneliness have taken the last of the famous midgets who toured the American conti nent a half century ago as the AmericanLilliputian Opera Com pany Eliza Nestel 80 died Sunday night Her brother Charles 88 died nine days ago They were the last survivors of the famous Lilliputian troupe and had earned enough fame in their own right to winpersonal audiences with Queen Victoria and Presi dent Abraham Lincoln Only Friends With Invitations May Go to Millmari Funeral DANVILLE those friendswho receive printed jnvitationsmaythear Wade Mil man old farm Ms1 funeral services near here May Millmanplans to getinto a casketmade tree on Ms farmSand1 rideto his grave He has selected pallbearers and paideach in advance Monday heproudly told of his new tombstone and the funeral plans WATERS RECEDE AT JOHNSTOWN Fears of Major Flood Are Temporarily Relieved as Rain Stops waters from tworivers inundated homes of Johnstown Monday and then reached a sta tionary reliev ing fears of a major flood Waters coursed to a depth of Ub feet up the lower end of Main principal thoroughfare in this city and the scene of two disastrous floods in the past half century A heavy 48 hour rainfall stopped at noon A Two hours later weather ob servers reported the Stony Creek river had receded four inches and slowly was going down further Seek Higher Ground by the swift ly rising waters after an all night rain moved to higher ground Merchants in the downtown area some of whom sutfered heavy damage in 1936 St Pat ricks day moved their stocks to Business came almost to astand still while the city prepared for a possible emergency Schools closed Trolleys stopped Trains were rerouted because of washed out tracks of villages in rural were isolated The wa ters covered parts of numerous highways The big Lower Cambria plant of the corporation was closed after water seeped into the employed there Threat at Pittsburgh threat extended all along the vast watershedsjfrom Johnstownto Pittsburghand south to Wheeling W the same damageof in the disaster ofa year ago At rose out of its banks at noon and was a stagethat would flood low Mayor Daniel Shields of John stown ordered evacuation small part of theJohnstown busi ness district becauseof the rising waters r bao Franco in Protest Bell Telephone company manager at Des Monies said late Sunday night wires were Broken and 100 poles were down in the state AMinneapolis bus was stranded at Sioux Center Iowa Sunday night and no attempt was made to operate on the highways from Sioux City toward Sioux Falls S where the storm apparent ly Snow Emmetsburjr A light blanket of snowcovered Emmetsburg and surrounding ter ritory with a wind giving the storm almost blizzard The snow had melted by evening but the weather con tinued cold with light rain falling intermittently North Iowa farmers were clean ing up wreckage of buildings des troyed or damaged by wind Fri day night and early Saturday All the buildings except the houseon the Henry Rojness farm near Joicewere moved and the barn badly damaged ir the Fri day evening windstorm The barn at the Ole Tweed farm near there was moved about two feet and the garage at the Peter Tween farm wrecked Laurel Road Opened reopened highway No 20 from Laurel to Sioux City andnearly 200 motorists marooned in Laurel by the weekend snow storm left lor the Iowa city after having been housed and fed by Laurel residents for two days The highway from Laurel to Norfolk was open and snowplows were clearing the road tosYankton S Dak Aberdeen S reported snow up to six inches Observers described a dust storm in the vi cinity of Pierre as rivaling those of 1933 and 1934 A snowstorm in the Red River valley and western Minnesota marooned 200 school children and their parents attending a music festival at Worthington A dust storm in northeastern Oklahoma cut visibility to 400 feet at Forgan in the panhandle Funeral Is Held for Smuggled Gigarets MARSEILLES France COP coffin arrived fronr Corsica safely Janded wasreceived by 12 mourners garbed in iuner al black A procession1 wasfonned andthecortege startedtlor a cem etery Analert customrguardbo ticed that there wereno women in the Hejstopped it and ordered the coffinchinsealed The coffin with British the mourners had hoped4to get through the customs The mourners wereheld Monday on crfargesjandsthe coffin wag impounded J Britairibecause Hood Britains mamrn6fa battle cruiser protected the food ships pp to the three mile limit last week Britain isdetermined to prevent interfer ence with her shipping outside this limit which is the extent of Spanish territorial waters But Franco contends the territorial limit is six miles Fifteen persons killed when insurgent guns again pound ed Madrid Four died in Sundays bombardment ofthe city Twelve deserters from the in surgent garrison at University City northwest Madrid suburb straggled into the They said the garrison cut off from com municationwith other insurgent was suffering from thirst hunger and a crumbling morale LOOK INSIDE FOR WALIJS SIMPSON Curator of Baltimore Museum Fears Worst PAGE 2 Investigation Bureau STATED PAGE Mark Byers Considers World Economic Parley PAGE 4 Coach Use Linebacks at S U L SEOKTSPAGE 300 Bankers Expected at Group Meeting Here PAGE 18 ALESCH ISSUES ULTIMATUM TO END STALLING rogress Toward Cleaning Up Rest of Sessions Business Slow DES MOINES a ireat by an Iowa farmer member f the house of representatives to take a walk and lead other farm members with him the lower hamber finally puUed itself out f a parliamentary complication Monday Rep Gustave Alesch of tfarcus smarting under repeated ttempts of two republican mem ers to thwart action on a minor ommission bill delivered the walkout ultimatum Im not Alesch shout d pointing toward the desks of Leo A Hoegh R of Chari on and Rep Earl R of Shehandoah Call of House Tiled The two representatives had iled a call of the house on a sen ate resolution for the formation of a committee of 15 to serve dur ng the legislative interim as a jroup under the council of state overnments to consider prospec ive legislation Filingof thecall and subse uent motions placed an obstacle efore the lower chamber which recluded all attempts to consider other legislation as the house trove to wind up its work Im not Alesch termed at the house I meaiv what I say Ill walk out of this house and Ive got a following of farmers that will go with me if tactics of this sort are far asthe two members werecon cerned but in at the speakers desk between republican and democratic leaders the call was hastily dissolved as Speaker a Mar Foster ordered The house will proceed with jtrx Immediately the house voted 84 o 35 to adopt the senate resolution vhich empowers creation of a committee of live from eachiouse lus five more including the state officials and private citizens cooperate with other states in drafting uniform laws The house also adopted a reso ution urging the postal depart ment to issue in July of 1938 arr centennial stamp Cleanup Paintup and FixupCampaign Opens PAGES Tll Slakes Little Progress The house had made littieor progress in acting upon remaining senate bills providing ment of claims and other odds ends before the legislature finally call it quits andj The senate cleared its slate late Saturday and recessed tomeetv Monday afternoon for a service after which it recessed il Tuesday morning to consider several minor appropriationbills Despite the determination of many in the house to forestall any further legislation a move was un der wayto compel last minute con sideration of a seriesof social welfare bills already passed by the Whether this bloc could muster adequate strength to bring upthe welfare program remained to be seen Refuse it Debate Bill The house refused Monday morning to take up a icnate bill devised to prevent the bootleg ging1 of cigarets to evade the 2 cents state Though presented asa measure to add yearly to the house declined to take it up House members Monday were very plainly tiring from the strain of the extended assembly Tempers were short and one flareup followed another At one juncture Representative Leroy S Mercer D threatened to clear the Tiouse of clerks the press andeveryone else unless quiet was maintained Cedar Falls Band You can so move at any Speaker Foster advised the mem ber The house passed senate file 465 permittingCedar Falls to levy up to onehalf milHor main tenance of in struction fund and also approved senatefile 533 legalizinga 700 Clayton county warrant Is sue toReplace the high school building and contents burned st Elkader It previous vote by whicjj a sen ate resolutibriauthorizing the gov ernSr to to formulate Towas 1938 territorial centennial celebration and adopted the centennial reso lution by acclaim   

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