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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - November 12, 1936, Mason City, Iowa                                NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME THE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH 10WANS NEIGHBORS HO ME EDITION VOL XLIU COPI ASSOCIATED PRESS LEASED WlRH MASON 12 1936 THIS PAPER CONSISTS OF TWO MOTIONS ONi NO 32 GHARST KILLED WHEN TRAIN HITS GAR LOCAL MANAGER OF OIL COMPANY MISHAP VICTIM Drives Auto Into Path of Gasoline Engine at Cameron William B Gharst 40 local man ager of the MidContinent Petroleum company since the early part of Au gust was instantly killed shortly before 10 oclock Thursday morn ing when he drove his Chevrolet coach directly into the path of an and St L gasoline engine at Cameron six miles south of Mason City onehalf mile east of highway 65 Company officials said Mr Gharst had left the city shortly af ter 9 oclock Poor visibility because of frame buildings near the track was be lieved by sheriffs officers to have been the cause of the accident The impact of the engine carried the car for onequarter of a mile and the body badly multilated was found about 100 feet from the scene of the accident Termed Accidental Coroner J E McDonald termed the fatality saying an investigation had proved to him that the train crew was in no way responsible for the accident He said no inquest would be necessary Dr McDonald said witnesses had told him the Gharst car was travel ing at a rate of 55 miles an hour the same speed at which the train was traveling Members of the crew said the train was traveling at such a high speed because it was 10 min utes late on its time schedule According to witnesses the train blew its whistle properly but Gbarstr apparently did not see the engine until he passed the buildings near the track Twenty feet from the tracks he apparently attempted to swerve his car northward wit nesses said but the car was struck broadside by the train Enroute to Rockford The local man was enroute Rockford where he had planned spend the day on business His c was demolished Members of the train crew wer J J Hayes conductor S S Swan son engineer andC D Gurney brakeman all of Marshalltown An other witness was Henry Diercks o Mason City who was doing car penter work on one of the nearb buildings Also witnesses to th crash were members of a sectio gang who were waiting for the ga engine to pass Mr Gharst was bora Aug 20 1896 at Greenup HI He had com to Mason City from Perry las August succeeding H E Godfrey who had resigned as local manage in the companys wholesale depart ment Survived by Family Mr Gharst is survived by his wife Ruth and three daughters Virginia Margaret and Betty al at home The family resides at 112 Ninth street northeast Mr Gharst had been employed by the MidCon tinent firm here four years ago in the capacity of salesman and was transferred to Perry In August he was again transferred to this terri tory At Perry as district salesman he was in charge of the Perry Boone Jefferson Adel Redfield Earlham Dexter Casey and Guthrie Center territories In addition to the Mason City territory Mr Gharst had charge of Britt Rockford and Sheffield dis tribution Funeral services will be held at the Patterson funeral home at Saturday morning The body was taken to the Patterson funeral home Picture Story of Fatal Crash at WLY Roosevelts Entire Cabinet May Resign According to Custom WASHINGTON Roosevelts entire cabinet may re sign before his second inauguration next Jan thatsjust an old cabinet custom With conjecture rife concerning the probable makeup of the next cabinet a white house attache ex pressed belief the 10 present cabinet officers would tender their resigna tions near the close of President Roosevelts current term as a mat ter of thus leaving him free to reappoint whom he de sired At the state department how ever experts on precedent said neither ambassadors nor ministers would submit resignations inas much as the election produced no change of administration William B Gharst shown lower left manager of the Mld Continent PetrdeBnPcompany was killed InSEzSrny1 wheiTTilsTcarr struck by an M and St L gasoline train at Cameron six miles south of Mason City At the top is shown the automobile wrecked in the ac cident and below it is a map of the scene of the crash Photos by Lock Map and Engravings by Kayenay HAS BETTER CHANCE Prospects for Ratification o Treaty With Canada Are Improved WASHINGTON studying the composition of the next senate friends of the St Law waterway said Thursday that rospects for ratification of a CanadianAmerican treaty ng for the project are much im roved A proposed treaty calling for in eraational cooperation to complete he deep water channel from Great cities to the Atlantic was re ected in 1934 by the senate of the eventythird congress But officials of the Great Lakes Lawrence Tidewater associa ion which numbers men from 21 tales among its membership say everal senators who opposed rati ication in 1934 will be missing from he next senate Moreover association officials de lare they already have commit ments favoring ratification from a umber of the new sennte members nd they believe several others who ere swept into office with the tide votes which reelected President loosevelt will follow his leadership They are counting upon the presi ent to submit a revised treaty arly in the session Fire Destroys Offices DRAKESVILLE des troyed the Trakesville Lumber com offices and yards here Wed esday night causing damage esti mated by E B Hedricks manager t Fire companies of Ot umwa andjBloomfield aided in put ng out the blaze which at one time ireatened the entire town Centurys Dream Realized in Opening of New Bridge Warships Salute Whistles Blow at San Francisco PICTURE ON PAGE 2 SAN FRANCISCO ing a centurys dream the San Francisco bay long est over navigable its 8 mile length to the first auto mobile traffic Thursday The time for the go signal was p p m Central Standard given amid the fanfare of the two metropolitan cen San Francisco and whistles ters it links Oakland the din of ship and saluting warships President Roosevelt will press button in Washington at p m flashing on brilliant so dium vapor lights that make head lights unnecessary in night traffic The bridge cost and took three years to build First on the program was the cut ting of a golden chain by Gov Frank F Merriam on the Oaklanc side and later on the San Francisco side after the partys cross ing Not even amaritime strike para yzing marine commerce in this ma jor seaport reduced preparations or the celebration which found streets festooned and garlanded Today tomorrow and Saturday parades regattas and social festivi ies will continue as thousands of automobiles try the new traffic ar tery Tourist bureaus estimated 000 visitors were here the opening to witness FORECAST IOWA Generally fair Thurs day night and rising temperature In west and north portions Friday MINNESOTA Oenerauy fair Thursday nlghlk and Friday ris ing temperature Friday and in northwest portion Thursday night mMASONCITY GlobeGazette weather figures for I hQur period ending at 8a m Thursday Maximum Wednesday degrees Minimum in Night 30 degrees At 8 a m Thursday 32 STRIKE PARLEYS TO BE REOPENED Assistant Labor Secretary Says Maritime Walkout to Be Settled SAN FRANCISCO iate opening of peace negotiations in the maritime strike that has throttled Pacific coast marine com merce for two weeks was forecast Thursday by Assistant Labor Secre tary Edward F McGrady It is obvious the strike must settled he declared Both sides have assured me tha negotiations will be resumed a once I still thinkthere is a chance to settle this strike The official spent most of Wed nesday conferring with representa tives of workers the striking union whose walkout at mid night Oct 29 has len anestimated 178 ships strikebound in west coast ports and Hawaii and led to sym pathy action in Atlantic and gulf harbors Hearings Postponed Again Rear Admiral Harry G Hamlet representative of the federal mari time commission meanwhile an nounced that its hearings into the situation would be postponed for the fifth time this time indefinitely after a session Thursday afternoon The intended to allow study of material gathered was to be taken after Attorney HI P Melnikow representing sixr of the seven striking unions an opening statement and1 presented exhibits Employers ditf that several days ago Efforts to effect release by unions of bound vessels snagged Wednesday night The unions joint policy mittee criticizing a Los Angeles federal judge for ordering one such cargo removed resolvedthat no consideration be of perishable cargo until shippers withdraw the court Without In Los Angeles FederalMarshal Robert Clack previously had re orted inability without o remove a signment from the liner California as direc ted by Federal Judge Me Cormick who granted the orderon jetition of the consignees Spokesmen for both sides have am OBJECTIONS ARE TRIAL PENCE Schedule of Payments Proposed in Merger Is Introduced FORT DODGE A disput over admission of important testi mony and introduction of evidenc of the schedule 6f proposed pay ments of to former Modern Brotherhood of America official marked Thursdays session of the trial of four former officials of tb brotherhood and a Chicago insur ance broker on mail fraud charges in federal court here Albert Hass of Mason City for mer M B A president W Pingree Curtis of Chicago Frank Parnell o Willard Knight of Creek direc ors and Clarence Parks of Cffica go insurance broker are the five on trial The government charges iem with misuse of the mails in obtaining a commission for arranging the merger of the Mod ern Brotherhood of America with he Independent Order of Foresters of Toronto in 1931 Former Examiner Heard Arguments centeredon the testi mony N H Armstrong of Coif ax former examiner for the Iowa in surance who examined the books of the Foresters after the merger Thegovernment claims he saw the records of the transaction QiE paid the de fendants for arranging the Objection was also made by the defense to the testimony of James Hanley of Davenport former su preme vice president of M B througn which the sought to introduce in evidence a special contract of employment with the X 0 F and a schedule showing payments officers and employes of the M B A were to receive over a period of years following the mer ger The government claims these contracts were not in fact agree ments wtih the I O F but were made by the defendants to cover cheiq trails in the secret commis sion transaction Schedule of Payments Hanley testified he first heard of the secret commission about six months after the merger when he received from the Canadian insur ance commission a schedule of pay ments the I O F was to malce of ficers and employes of the brother hood On this schedule he said he found listedthe payment to the defendants This shedule listed proposed payments of more than he testified Under the schedule Curtis would have receiv ed over a period of four years Hass Parnell and Knight each and Parks 000 These sums included their span of the secret commission and thi salaries of which the M B A membership had knowledge he tes tified However payment was not car ried out after the secret commission was paid and settlements made on the socalled special contracts the government contends Met in Chicago Hanley a meeting in Chi cago in Junef 1932 at which he an the defendants were present and a which secret commission and other payments were discussed Judge George Scott said he would rule later on the admissibility of the testimony The prosecution Wednesday intro duced copies of checks totaling which it claimed was paid to the defendants as a secret com mission The checks for and were drawn on the Canad an and made payable to Clarence Parks one of the de fendants Deen pessimistic concerning re sumption of negotiations Strikers claimednearly 250 ships were tiedup by sympathy walkouts in Atlantic and gulf ports 79 Vessels Held In New York wheretheySaid 79 vessels were de clared 22 ships cleared Wednesday Fivehundred members of the In dustrial Union of Marine and Ship rard Workers of America voted Wednesday night on strikingv for ugher wages recognition n San Pedro CaL The men areem ployed by the Bethlehem and Los Angeles shipyards where some becauseof the maritime trike are0 drydocked for overhaul and repairs Would Keep Big Powers Over Money WASHINGTON W Treasury officials rhinted Thursday that the administration will ask congress to continue indefinitely its present far reaching monetary powers A bill will be of the first few days of the high the gov ernments authority to maintain the stabilization fund and special powers to vary the gold content of the dollar Both are scheduled to expire Janu ary 30 under present law The official asserted itvhad not been finally determinedwhetherthe would be or some fixed period or indefinitely but add ed that the prevailing opinion of treasury experts favored unlimited continuance In New Agreement This was was said Because of this countrys participa tion in the new monetary agree ment with France and England Under this accord the three na ions are pledged to use appropri ate available resources to prevent sharp fluctuations in their curren cies Although any nation may with draw from the agreement if its in ternal economy isadversely affect ed no such withdrawal is in sight now Since the understanding seems ikely to continue for an indefinite period officials said it appears de sirable to extend the lifeof the stabilization fund indefinitely to as sist the United States out its part of the It is riot knownexactlytorwhat extent Secretary Morgenthau has used con nection with the tripower uhder Wins Nobel Prize EUGENE ONEILL he isclosed the purchase pf about pounds to halt what he ailed a Russian effort to drive own of sterling Taken FromFund A total of has been aken from the fund for use as a working balance in international xchange dealings with OO still available if it is needed In dditioh to the original 00 the treasury has chalked up ome profit from international ex change but the amount f this is not known The presidents power to vary the old content of the dollar is closely ed up with operation of thestabil ation fund because it gives him Jdedt control over the nations cur ency in relation to currencies of her countries At present the dollar is fixed at bout 59 per cent of its former gold alue Under existing law Mr oosevelt could further reduce it to per cent of the former value LOOK INSIDE FOR OSSIE SOLEM Oze Simmons Back in Hawkeye Team Lineup ON PAGE 15 Hancock County Sets Early Corn Show Date ON PAGE 5 Jury Says Contested Iwers Will Genuine ON PAGE 2 PLAYWRIGHT IS NOBEL WINNER ONeill Second American to Receive Honorary Award in Literature STOCKHOLM Sweden gene ONeill the play wright Thursday wasawardedthe 1936 Nobel7 prize for letters The prize ONeillwill receive will approximate The amount of which was not awarded has been added to the 1936 sum Interest from the be quest of the late Alfred B Nobel dynamite inventor is used for the prizes Thrice winner of the Pulitzer only American dramatist to hold that triple ONeill by Thursdays award be came Americas second Nobel prize winner in letters Sinclair Lewis was the One of First Idols At 48 ONeill joins the company of Anatola France Thomas Mann Tagore Maeterlinck and Rudyare Kipling one of his first literary idols A product ofBakers famous 4 Workshop at Harvard and of th American Little Theater movement ONeill first won the Pulitzer prizi with his play Beyond the Horizon in 1920 Anna Christie in 1922 and Strange Interlude in 192i gained the award for him twice more t Working on Saga He was last reported working on an encyclopedic saga of American cycle of eight plays chron icling the 125 year drama of an American family through five gen erations In announcing the stupendous task the Theater Guild called it the most ambitious and the most inter esting ever undertaken by any mod ern The saga the announcement said would portray the family from 1829 to 1932 in New England NeW York the Pacific coast and the middle west 4 Clinton Boys Who Ran Away Are Held by Police m Chicago CHICAGO boys who ran away from their homes in Clin ton were held by Chicago police Thursday pending arrival of their parents Arthur Anderson 13 told police he and his companions came here to visit his uncle a Mr first name and address he did not know The boys were taken into custody soon after they from a North Western road freight train in suburban Proviso Besides Ander son theyare Merle Hood 13 Albert Otto 14 and Marvin Hegberg 13 lowan Kills Jfeself by Slashing Throat CENTERVTLLE committed Tuesday night throat a butcher knife in the yardof his home RalpttTalbot who called to the homeby yelled to stop but the act Talbot could reach him Despondent cy was givenas the suicide The widow and four children1 survive BATTLE TO TAKE SPAINS CAPITAL HEARING CLIMAX Madrid Defenders Expect More Reinforcements From Barcelona By ALEXANDER H UHL MADRID Madrid war command asserted late Thursday that government forces in a sudden flank movement from the west had recaptured Getafe eight miles south cf Madrid The announcement said the cap ture followed a short battle and that the government troops found the suburb occupied by only a few fas cist troops These were captured with quantities of arms and ammu nition the government leaders add ed Getafe site of an important air drome Ues behind the lines of the fascist armies at present besieging 6 Heavy Artillery Fire Heavy artillery lire broke out Thursday night after a lull of sev eral hours Most xjf the insurgent shells were directed at government battery positions at the city gates but several fell in the center of the capital tearing large holes in roofs and injuring an undetermined num ber of persons The insurgent armies meantime struck at Madrids most vulnerable approach ina driving rain They attacked TTniversity City on tie northwest apparently the key to their whole advance joulsJdrts is Jnot defended by the Manzanareu river which has been a barrier to Madrid from the southwest Reinforcements Expected Buenaventura Dirruti command er of the Catalan shock troops told the Associated Press that ad ditional Catalan reinforcements wotUdreachMadrid Friday and Sat urday bringing to the fight ers from that autonomous province who are aiding in the Madrid de The noted anarchist who has re fused military rank of any kind said he was well satisfied with developments Moving up through Casa del Campo the former game preserve across the river on the west the in surgents met a violent artillery bar rage Cannon roared throughout the night Machine gun and rifle fire broke the sudden silence when the big guns cease Struggle Nearg Climax The bitter struggle for est road into the capital was rapid ly approaching a climax The rain and the low ceiling kept warplanes out of action but the ri val guns kept pounding positions spotted by lightning flashes during the night Several fires set off by the ar tillery bombardment in the city were put but by the rain The clatter of horses hoofs and the tramp of thousands of feet gave evidence the government was pour ing reinforcements into strategic points as rapidly as possible Reported Trapped Among the many unconfirmed re ports was one that a thousand in surgents had been trapped in Casa del Campo Official sources did not bear out the report A close observation of the sector moreover show heavy fighting in no indication the in rear lines had been cut University Cityitself was under to the Fascist commanders halted an earlier surprise attackin the north west the drive resistance from an international legion blocking the entrance through northern Univer sity Down The onslaught started shortlyrbe ore midnight but died down a few Although fascist ocialiatguns diminished fire there he roar of insurgent cannon still As shells crashed into Madnd rom othergun em jwere jvacatea and the moved front line trenches around river bridgeonNlie muziles otfSM oivSOCfyardr themf Government labored fev ishlyjo return the vengeful fire WhiteJiot shells from the socialist streaked across the darX sky while ied glares from unceinnj   

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