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Mason City Globe Gazette: Thursday, October 8, 1936 - Page 1

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - October 8, 1936, Mason City, Iowa                                NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME THE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH 10WANS NEIGHBORS HOME EDITION FIVE CENTS A COPY ASSOCIATED PRESS LEASED WISE SERVICE MASON CITY IOWA THURSDAY OCTOBER 8 1936 THIS PAPER CONSISTS OF TWO SECTION ONE 313 EUROPE GRIPPED BY NEW WAR SCARE BRITISH ACTIVE AFTER RUSSIANS PUBLISH THREAT Complete Breakdown of Nonintervention in Spain Seen LONDON foreign secretary Anthony Eden suddenly broke off a Monte Carlo holiday Thursday and turned back toward London to take charge of the for eign office in the grave atmosphere created by a soviet ultimatum threatening Spanish intervention Captain Eden enroute home will confer in Paris Friday with Premier Leon Blum of France concerning AngloFrench action in the new crisis Adding to the dangers of the situ ation it was reported other coun tries in addition to Russia are ready to raise the qusstion of breaches of the international Spanish neutrality pact at Fridays meeting of the non intervention committee British Officials Silent V British officials maintained the most discreet silence concerning the affair pending Fridays meeting Apparently they had recovered from the initial shock of the outspoken Russian communication which flat ly accused Italy Germany and Por tugal of giving military assistance to the fascist insurgents in Spain Dates of the alleged breaches of the nonintervention accord listed in the soviet communication were expected to prove most important during the committee deliberations The question was raised whether some arms shipments mentioned in the note might not already have been on the seas enroute to Spanish destinations when the noninterven tion pact went into effect Note Mentions Dates The soviet note in detailing al leged German and Italian war ship ments to Spain some of them through Portugal mentioned dates between Sept 10 and Sept 29 The first meeting of the nonintervention committee was held in London on Sept 9 although Germany and Italy with other nations previously had agreed to stop such shipments Observers pointed out a ticklish situation might arise in Spanish eastern waters should the soviet union decide to withdraw from the neutrality pact and openly seek to aid the Madrid government Any attempt by soviet ships to visit Barcelona Valencia and Ali cante now held by the Madrid gov ernment would result in retaliatory action by the insurgents and would raise a serious threat of open hostil ities these persons said Ships May Withdraw It was anticipated British naval vessels now lying off the three ports might withdraw to avoid be ing drawn into international com plications League of nations officials at Geneva described the situation as of the deepest gravity They pon dered its effect upon the socialist French government and Premier Leon Blum who has been besieged his leftist supporters to aid their popular front brothers in Spain In Berlin the propaganda minis try categorically denied Russias charge that Germany was delivering war material to the Spanish fas cists and asserted it was adhering strictly to the agreement Informed Italian sources denied Premier Mussolini had violated the hands off agreement Since Portugal Eas refused con sistently despite strong British rep resentatives to participate in the committees work it appeared an almost hopeless task to achieve a genuine workable neutrality FASCISTS TIGHTEN UNES ABOUND MADRID By The Associated Press On the war front fascist insur gents tightened their lines around Madrid at many points and de manded immediate surrender of the capital under threat of destruc tion by bombardment from land and They were within striking dis tance of Madrid Madrids weary militiamen fought on to defend their shrinking terri tory with unflinching stubborn ess In the rolling countryside about 25 miles southwest of the capital they held commanding but hardbatter ed positions Stories from the fascist lines in the Sierra de Credos mountains near San Martin de Valdeiglesias told how insurgent cavalrymen in difficult terrain leaped from their horses to iight their way from one government ambuscade to another on foot Hanlon Retires as President of P G and E Johnson Brigham 90 State Librarian Dies Veteran of Civil War Had Served in Post Since 1898 DES MOINES Brigham 90 state librarian since 189S died here Thursday morning less than two days after he suf fered a cardiac embolism an ob struction in his heart Brigham had been confined to his home most of the last year but was not seriously ill until he suf fered the stroke Tuesday night He was only partly conscious Wednesday Death ended his brilliant career as editor publisher diplomat au thor and state librarian During his last years he looked back with mellow perspective on a history he helped make then wrote and preserved as author and li brarian Mr Brigham is survivd by two daughters Mrs Mary Brigham Johnson and Mrs Hartley both of Washington D C His wife died in 1930 A daughter Mrs Ida Storms died in Mukden Man churia in 1933 State Owes Him Much The state of Iowa owes much to Johnson W Brigham for the preser vation of its history He not only was the author of several important historical works but his duties as state librarian were marked by a zeal in maintaining an ever in creasing group of pioneer records Brigham However was mora than a historian for he was in fluential in moulding the activities of his adopted state As editor ol the Cedar Rapids Republican from 1S81 to 1893 he was a prominent figure in Iowa journalism As chair the Linn county republican committee fifth district congres sional committeeman and president ofthe Iowa Republican league the later in 1893 he was a leading ad visor ia the circles of his party Brighams service extended also to the national government In 1883 he was United States consul to AixlaChapelle Germany He returned to Iowa find in 1898 was appointed state librarian Toured at 80 His advancing years failed to daunt Brigham in his passionate desire to extend his vista of knowl edge and his contact with current affairs On the eve of his eightieth birthday in 1926 be and his wife started on a tour of the world re turning to Des Moines the foDowing year Again in August 1929 they made another trip to China to visit their daughter and her family Mean while the librarian had completed an account of his roundtneworlU journey as a climax to his literary career Although he spent most of his life in the middle west Brigham was a native of New York He was born at Cherry Valley March 11 1846 the son of Phineas and Eliza Johnson Brigham Graduated From Cornell His elementary education was re ceived at the public schools of Wat kins an Elmira N after which he enrolled in Hamilton college He remained there for only a year 1867 and then completed his course at Cornell university He became a member of Alpha Delta Phi frater nity Entering newspaper work Bng ham became editor of the Hornell N Daily Times and later held the same position on the Fargo Daily Republican In 1875 he married Antoinette Gano at Watkins N and a daughter Anna Gano Brigham was born to them Mrs Brigham so6n died and after her husband came to Cedar Rapids he married Lucy H Walker Dec 20 1892 Her father was W W Walker who built the Chicago and North Western rail road from Cedar Rapids to Sioux City Two daughters Ida W and Mary were born to them Editor at Cedar Rapids Brigham served as both editor and publisher of the Cedar Rapids Republican On his removal to Des Moines he edited the Midland Monthly for four years until he ac cepted supervision of the state li braries As a librarian he was prominent in organizations of his colleagues At one time he was president of the National Association of State Li braries and of the Iowa Library association Societies of the Unitar ian church also held his Interest and he served a term as president of the Des Moines chamber Of com merce His state office also carried the president of the Iowa Library com mission During the World war he served as Secretary Newton Bakers library council In charge of the JOHNSON W BRIGHAM TWO INJURED IN AUTO COLLISION Horse Killed When Truck and Car Meet at Crossing Before Noon men were badly injured shortly before noon Thursday when a truck and car crashed about 5 miles east and 2 miles south of here The truck was driven by Cleav M Stanton truck er of London car by Vernon Kuhlman farmer residing southeast of Northwood Mr Stantons skull was crushed and Mr Kuhlman received internal injuries The men were taken to where they were given first aid treatment and then taken to a hospital at Albert Lea Minn Three horses were in the truck when it was overturned One of the horses was killed The truck and car were badly damaged Young Woman Attacked CEDAR RAPIDS 51 Police said a 26 year old Mount Vernon woman reported that she had been criminally attacked by a motorist who picked her up as she hitch hiked from Cedar Rapids where she is employed to her FORECAST IOWA Fair in northern Iowa possibly unsettled in southern portion Thursday night and Fri day not so cool in northwest and north central portions Thursday night MINNESOTA Fair in south increasing cloudiness in north Thursday nijjht and Friday somewhat cooler Friday in north portion IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather figures for 24 hour period ending at 8 oclock Thursday morning Maximum Wednesday 66 Minimum in Night 36 At 8 A M Thursday 48 Iowa drive for books for soldiers he collected volumes Health Was Good Brigham retained exceptionally good health His most serious illness before his last was during the Civil war He enlisted in the union army at the age of 16 years At Alexan dria he became seriously ill but was nursed by a southern wo man who succeeded in curing him While primarily interested in liter ary endeavors Brigham maintained several business connections includ ing the vice presidency of the Farm Property Mutual Insurance com pany of Des Moines His books included The Life of James The History of Des Iowa Its History and Foremost An Old Mans and The Sinclairs of Old Fort Des On his eightythird birthday Brigham took occasion to express his views on literature He denounc ed modern sex and plead ed for a return of interest in the classics Declaring he had read more than books he said he was particularly fond of the works of Louis Bromfield and Edith Whar ton STRICKLAND TO SUCCEED HIM IN LOCAL COMPANY New Utility Chief Vice President of United Light Power The retirement of Frank J Han Ion from the positions of president of the Peoples Gas and Electric company and general manager of the Mason City and Clear Lake Railroad company was announced Thursday afternoon Mr Hanlon will be succeeded by Charles Strickland vice president of the United Light and Power com pany Mr Strickland who has been with the utility company since 1930 will arrive in Mason City Friday to take over the active management of the properties Mr Strickland is well known in the community having made fre quent visits here in connection with his office as vice president He en tered the utility field from that of banking in which he was engaged for several years in western Kansas Denver and Cleveland Born in Kansas Mr Strickland was born in Junc tion City July 2 1892 In 1914 he was graduated from the University of Kansas from which he entered the banking business He is a veteran of the World war hav ing served as a lieutenant of infan try and later as captain in the re serves He is a member of the Phi Pappa Phi and a number of other fraternities the Masonic lodge copal church plar and Shrine He was the first outoftown member of the Euchre and Cycle club in Mason City As soon as convenient Mr Strick land plans to move his family con sisting of a wife and three daugh ters to Mason City He has one daughter in junior high school one in the seventh grade and the est in the kindergarten Active Here 40 Years Mr Hanlon who has been active in the affairs of the utility company here for 40 years is making plans for an extended vacation to re cuperate his health Under his management the prop erties of the utility company have grown from a small plant to one of the most modern in the country capable of handling the needs of an expanding industrial community He also became active in other in dustrial and business institutions to the extent that he was elected a member of the boards of the First National bank and the Northwest ern States Portland Cement com pany and president and general manager of the Mason City Brick and Tile company Helped Found In the last 25 years of Mason City progress the helping hands of Mr Hanlon have been in many places They helped found the Com munity Chest and carry it on They helped found the Mason City Social Welfare league They helped build the beautiful building of the Young Mens Christian association They helped carry on the Chamber of Commerce as a director and chair man of its important committee on industrial promotion And they have helped so many good causes and events with time with money with kindly courageous and keen advice that the list would include nearly every community undertak ing of the last quarter of a century As he has laughingly remarked at times he has pounded out many miles on the sidewalks of Mason City in the interest of these many causes Those who have known him best love and appreciate him best for all that he has meant to them and to this community to which he has given so much of his life Got a Month Mr Hanlon got liis start in the business world when as a boy he began working for a month as office boy for the Mason City and Fort Dodge railroad now a part of the Chicago Great Western system He was born inWells Aug 12 1878 When he was 7 years old the family moved to Lyle Minn His father Thomas Hanlon was an engineer on the Great Western railroad and when the division point was changed to Mason City in 1890 the Hanlons moved here His duties as office boy included carrying coal up two flights of stairs for the large stoves that heated the building Then In the afternoon he had to carry the huge bags of railroad mail down to the Great Western station and from there to the Milwaukee station and Retires From Active Business then to Iowa Central the present M and St station Evenings during this period were spent in studying textbooks at night and the next spring he took the final examinations and was graduated with high grades with his class from the Mason City high school Became Stenographer His next move was to the posi tion of stenographer in the gen eral freight department He then became stenographer in the general superintendents office on the Iowa Central railroad at Marshalltown from which position he was pro moted to chief clerk in the same office In 1897 Mr Hanlon came back to Mason City to stay receiving a position as auditor of the Mason City and Clear Lake railroad Later when the Mascn City Elec tric company bought out the rail road he was made general man ager When W E Brice soldout the utility property to the United Light and Power company Mr Hanlon was made president of the Peoplels Gas and Electric company which position he held up to the time of his retirement Mr Hanlon has always been at the forefront of those who have be lieved Mason City was headed for future expansion Look at the he once said At one time we were much smaller than the towns we have since passed Location for Growth We have an ideal location for growth Northern Iowa can be di vided from the rest of the state by the Illinois Central railroad Along that line acrossthe state then are a number of good sized towns But above that line Mason City the only town of its size and there is no reason why we should not pass some of the southern towns in size Once when queried as to the rea son for his achieving success he answered At the risk of speaking a plati tude and I know it sounds like one I will say that work is now and al ways has been a requisite for suc cess It is impossible to keep a man down that works If he gets too big for his job there are always places open for one of his caliber We have had numerous instances here in our own of men that were too good for what we had to offer them And they in spite of the present modern philosophy were Body of Man Found in River Identified CLINTON of a body foundSunday In the Missis sippiriver north of here as that of Steve T Yohe 58 La Crosse was made Thursday by Frank raert a relative BANDIT SEIZES PAYROLL Bookkeeper at Baking Firm in Muscame Slugged Over Head MUSCATINE 3 Slugging Mrs Eva Simpson bookkeeper at the Kautz Baking company here early Thursday afternoon a lone masked bandit seized a payroll of more than and made his escape The bandit masked and attired in white overalls entered the office by a back stairway Mrs Simpson believing him to be a Halloween prankster obeyed his gestures or dering her to enter a side room Peeking through the door she saw him rifling the cash drawer and as she attempted to stop him he struck her on top of the head with his revolver inflicting a deep scalp wound Apparently believing he had floored her he fled while she has tened to a phone to summon police Glimpsed by Mrs George Lane who lives in a flat in the bakery building the bandit ordered her out of his way and threatened her with the gun when she screamed None of the other 59 employes of the bakery saw the man enter or leave the building Lawler Man Receives Burns in Contact With Electric Transformer NEW E Eick hoff Lawler merchant who was knocked unconscious late Wednes day night when contact with a short circuit in a volt trans former knocked him from a tele phone platform to the ground 16 feet below was expected to be re leased from a New Hampton hos pital Thursday afternoon He was brought here shortly after the accident for treatment of severe burns on his left arm Three other men on the platform escaped Negro Gets Life for Des Moines Killing DBS MOINES district court jury here found Lyman Ta tum 37 year old Negro guilty of the first degree murder of Earl Hughes another Negro Thursday Tatum was sentenced to life im prisonment He was charged with stabbing Hughes to death Sept 1 during a fight F R Starts Trip to Get Wests Vote First Lady on Train Which Will Stop in Iowa First ABOARD ROOSEVELT TRAIN ENROUTE WEST Roosevelt speeded westward Thurs day to renew in his second major campaign trip his drive to win votes for four more years of his ad ministration The western swing will take the chief executive into 11 states and as far west as the Rocky mountains His special train pulled out of Washington about noon with stops scheduled first in Iowa Friday where at Dubuque and Oelwein the president planned to make the first of a score of appearances on the rear platform of his private car Details of his itinerary still re mained to be perfected and white house officials said Marvin H Mc Intyre the presidents secretary would advance daily from the train the full schedule for the following day Has Two Conferences The president held two minor con ferences in the last few minutes be fore he stepped into a white house limousine to drive to the Union sta tion in Washington Those who joined the official party at least for part of the tour in addition to Mrs Roosevelt and the presidents daughterinlaw Mrs James Roosevelt were Secretary Wallace Senators OMahdney of Wyoming Pittman of Nevada and Wheeler of Montana Breckinridge Long former ambas sador to Italy Judge and Mrs Sam uel Rosenman and Mrs Gilbert H Hitchcock Widow of Senator Mrs Hitchcock is the widow of the former senator from Nebraska and is to make the trip only as far as Omaha The morning conferences were with a group of Lutheran ministers presented by the German ambassa dor and with Jesse Jones RFC chairman The nine day drive will carry him through much ofthe agricultural midwest into the Rocky mountains and back to populous New York state The president was primed for two major broadcast appeals to the from Omaha on the night of Oct 10 the other from Chicago the night of Oct 14 To Invade Kansas The democratic candidate will in vade the home state of his repub lican opponent Gov Alf M Landon of Kansas Beside the major ad dresses he will make more than a score of rear platform appearances during the trip and will speak at Denver the morning of October 12 and at Detroit the afternoon of the fifteenth Returning to his Hyde Park N home a week from Saturday the president plans later to make a swing into New England particu larly where the re publicans have been reported very active LOOK INSIDE FOR DAYTON DEAN Confessed Black Legion Triggerman Gets Life ON PAGE 2 Red Cross Disaster Relief Work Outlined ON PAGE 10 0 R Latham Talks at I S T C Anniversary ON PAGE 3 ALLEN CHARGES RELIEF WASTE IN LOCAL ADDRESS Declares Landon Would Take Politics Out of Social Security Sixty cents out of every relief dollar is spent in political adminis tration leaving only 40 cents for the person who is supposed to be assisted Such was the charge made Wed nesday night by former Senator Henry of Kansas in an ad dress at a republican rally in the Y M C A auditorium A continuation of prodigal spend ing with outgo more than twice as much as income he warned can mean only one new depres sion and absolute bankruptcy Under an administration by his fellow Kansan AlfIiaxidon he said both relief and social security would be administered by civil service rather than as a political racket Example of England We have the example of Eng land to guide he declared re calling his study of relief adminis tration in that country Back in the days when there was what he called a studied attempt to increase employment there the re lief cost was 50 cents out of every dollar And after the task had been transferred to civil he add ed that 50 cents out of every dollar had been reduced to 4 cents America can and will do the same under a sane Mr Allen was introduced by At torney John Senneff fourth district member of the republican central committee Mr Allen said that tie had found from that period when the country was giving the president a chance and Senator Dickinson and himself were stand ing out against the administration The recompense for our blind faith has been a debt of some 25 odd billion he declared Charges Waste Weve always been an expensive country but we have developed a gieai country I was glad there fore when President Roosevelt said It will be my aim to reduce gov ernment expenses 25 per But who was he to criticize our expend itures for 125 years In that time we spent in develop ment fought four wars and paid pensions and in the past 3 years we have spent a billion more dollars than was expended in the 125 years previous To have poured this out without waste would have been impossible Nobody would have anyone starvfe Nobody resents relief What we do resent is that 60 cents out of every relief dollar spent has gone to polit ical administration to 40 cents for relief Im challenging the administra tion to show me the books Show me the books of the PWA The president has got to show me some thing more than smiling words when he talks about are still unemployed Be fore he makes me believe recovery is here he has to button up the gaps When the NRA stopped coercing business he said he was giving iw a breathing spell No recovery baa come with the laws passed by the new deal The laws that affect busi BSS now are about the same as be fore the new Increased Taxes Mr Allen warned his that increased taxation is inevitable He discounted statements made H the effect that taxes will be paid by those who can afford to pay by showing that the consumer pays the bill in hidden taxes When you soak the rich you drown the said Mr Allen On everything you buy from tne cradle to the grave there ia a hid den tax There are even 78 hidden taxes on an ordinary For the last fiscal year Mr Allen pointed out the per capita tax in England was During the same period the federal government alone in the United States spent per capita England spent 10 per cent less running her government for one year that the United States spent running the federal government We have passed from the lowest to thefchighest taxed government on theworld When you spend twice what you make you are on the road to The reelection of President Roosevelt Mr Allen prophesied would mean depression No 2 bankruptcy communism or fascism and a loss of the last vestage of Unemployed In spite of the crowd of people on the payrolls of the unemployed the speaker said there was a abort   

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