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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: August 31, 1936 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - August 31, 1936, Mason City, Iowa                                UIT 01 NORTH JOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME THE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS HOME EDITION VOL XLII Five CENTS copy ASSOCIATED PRESS LEASED WIRE SERVICE MASON CITY IOWA MONDAY AUGUST 31 1936 THIS PAPEJi CONSISTS OF TWO SECTIONS SECTION ONE NO 280 Vandenberg Sorry Now Might Have Worked Harder for G 0 P Nomination By CHAKLES P STEWAKT ASHINGTON CPA Plenty of politicians ven ture the guess that Senator Ar thus H Vanden berg of Michi 5 gan had he been able to look a trifle less than three monthsin to the future at the time of the republican con vention in Cleve land would have tried then con siderably harder than he did to win the G O P presidential nom ination for himself It is true that at that juncture it was a nomination which ap peared very much like a selection to be defeated to a practical cer tainty in November Nearly all the best judges repub licans included though they are ad mitting it only just thought so when the Cleveland gathering convened There was a slight re publican chirking up toward ad journment but it was no more than a weakish bluff until rather re cently Desired to Wait Vandenberg did not say so but it generally was assumed that he was as republicanly pessimistic as any one else On that supposition il was widely regarded as nalural in him not to care for a place not even first and certainly not second place on his partys ticket but to prefer to wait for a possibly better chance in 1910 If he had fought for it it is quite likely that he could have had the presidential nomination He was quite a strong at licked as everyone guessed How ever as e guessed the same way indifferent to say the least After Governor Landons nomina tion he simply was begged to go on the ticket as the Kansans run ning mate but would not accept That was deemed natural too there is no great credit in being beaten for the presidency still less in being beaten for the vice presi dency Scene Has Changed Today the scene has changed Governor Landon is reckoned to stand a fighting chance in Novem ber It may be a doubtful chance but it is one which Senator Van denberg probably would have been willing to take if he had realized last June that it would exist a bit later in the campaign Moreover it is the political con sensus that Vandenoergs chance had he accepted it would have been more substantial than the chance which Landon did accept That is to say Call Landons chance 4060 the best odds I would care to give if I were betting at all On that basis maybe Vandenbergs odds should be 4553 if he were the republican candidate Wasnt Good Enough At the opening date of the Cleve land convention one would have said that the republican nominees chances were about 1 in 10 Thut wasnt good enough for Vandenberg and no wonder Present republican prospects are not so but not too hopeless for a republican aspirant to take a flyer on If Vandenberg could but have foreseen Precisely what has changed the situation is immaterial I doni know what did it Nobody does Since as capable politicians as President Roosevelt and Senator Vandenberg were fooled I think I sscmd be par doned if I was fooled too Formidable Candidate Anyway it is politically agreed now that President Roosevelt who had a cinch at the beginning of June has a fight on his hand at the beginning of September that his republican rival who did not stand a show at the beginning of June is tolerably formidable at the begin ning of September It would be a corking good joke on Senator Vandenberg if the man to whom tie turned over the repub lican presidential nomination last June as not worth having think ing to have it four years hence more favorably should win this year and of course be the whole thing in 1940 U8 WARSHIPS WILL RETURN FIRE StepSon of Secretary Ickes Commits Suicide Proprietor of River Boat Under Arrest DAVENPORT Albert Irvin 42 proprietor of the Floaling Pal ace a river boat fitted into a bar room and dance pavilion was ar rested aflcr police and federal cgents raided Ihe boal Officers they seized 25 cases of beer In another raid on the Irvin apart ment police arrested Irvins wile Jennie 40 WIFE CHILDREN BOUNDFORHOIf WHEN INFORMED Pajama Clad Body Found in Bed 111 Health Believed Cause CHICAGO Ickcs 37 year old foster son of Secretary of the Interior Harold L Ickes was found shot to death Monday in his stepfathers suburban Winnetka home on the first anniversary of the death of his mother Mrs Anna Wilmarth Ickes Police Sergeant Harold Lewis of the suburb said Unquestionably it is suicide The official said a 310 automatic pistol was on Ickes1 chest Young Ickes recently learned he had tuberculosis interior depart ment officials said in Washington Winnetka police also thought he might have brooded over the death of his mother near Velarde N Mex when an automobile in which she was riding was overturned Secretary Ickes immediately boarded a plane at Washington for Chicago Notified of Tragedy Wilmarth Ickes wife the former Elizabeth Dahlman of Milwaukee was notified of the tragedy as she returned to Chicago from a lake cruise With her were their children Donald 12 Anna 10 and Barbara 6 The pajama clad body was found by Eric Magnuson gardener and caretaker of the elder Ickcses tate The cabinet member formally adopted Wilmarth after his mar riage to Mrs Ickes Wilmarths father Prof James Westphal Thompson then in the department of English at the University of Chi cago was divorced in 1909 Magnuson had been in the habit of awakening Wilmarth each morn ing Monday Magnuson said Ickes was stretched across a bed a pistol on his chest and a powder burned bullet hole through the right tem ple i Arrive in Chicago A few minutes later Mrs Ickes and the children arrived in Chicago and the caretaker told them by tele phone of the tragedy Ickes mother was an outstanding republican and had served several erms in the Illinois house of repre sentatives Besides his immediate family and his foster father Wilmarth is sur vived by a full brother and sister Xobert Ickes and Mrs Requa M Bryant of Evanston and a half nother Raymond Ickes the son oC he secretary and his wife Robert and Mrs Bryant were adopted children of the elder Ickes Capt Harry E Enault of the Winnetka police said his investiga tion would be confined to question ing Mrs Ickes and Dr Frank Blatchford the victims physician An inquest will be held Tuesday morning in nearby Evanston at an undertaking establishment to which the body was removed Suffered Bad Headaches While a statement issued at Sec retary Ickes offices in Washington said Wilmarth had notified his wife he was suffering from tuberculosis Dr Blatchford the victims physi cian said he had no knowledge his patient had that ailment He had suffered for 30 years from migraines severe Dr Blatchford said He had a par ticularly bad headache Friday morning and he called me to the home I gave him some medicine and he felt much better Saturday I told him to come to my office at LOOK INSIDE FOR B N HENDKICKs Riceville Attorneys Rites to Be Wednesday ON PAGE 8 Harris Gilpin Wins in 38Hole Legion Tussle ON PAGE 9 AllStars to Shine in Feature Football Tilt ON PAGE 9 Butter Theft Trials in Kossuth Chickasaw ON PAGE 8 Part Time Retail Sales Course Offered in H S ON PAGE 14 Look for Chapter 34 of Love Isnt Important ON PAGE 5 Hitler Takes Some of Headlines From Spam ON EDITORIAL PAGE WEATHER IN IOWA BACK TO NORMAL Highest Temperature Shown in State Over Sunday 89 at Atlantic DES MOINES weath er came back to normal over the j destroyer Kane off the Spanish PRESIDENT SEES RELIEF J08S IN WEST NEBRASKA In Touch With Capital on Spanish Situation Talks at Sidney SIDNEY Nebr Roosevelt said in a short informal address here today that summer fal lowing in the western Nebraska panhandle had proved a beneficial forward looking step in meeting the drought Leaving his special train for a tour of relief projects and farm houses in this area the president paused at a microphone beside his private car and spoke to several thousand persons from Nebraska and Colorado standing in a blazing sun The special train carrying the body of the late Geogrc H Dcrn of Utah secretary of war passed through as the Roosevelt special ar rived The Roosevelt train will go to Salt Lake City as the second section of the funeral train On Sad Mission 1 arn here as you know the president said on the sad mission to attend the funeral of a very dis Unguisned American Secretary of War George H Dern You all re member that Dern was a native of Nebraska Because of this mission I cannot with propriety make a speech to you I am taking this opportunity to look into the problems of Ne braska The president said he was trying to learn first hand what you have done in relation to summer fallow ing I understand you have taken the lead in this which has been re sponsible for making a per cent drop he said There are lots of sections in oth er parts of the country which have not had any per cent Cattle Buying Program He said he also wanted to see the progress of the federal cattle pur chasing program because all these things tie together in the drought relief program He concluded with an expression of hope he would find the same co operation with the government among local and state agencies in Nebraska as he had found in other states on his tour As Mr Roosevelt stepped from his train here 10 year old Barbara Radcliff presented him with a large basket of red roses ROOSEVELT CONCERNED OVER BOMBING OF SHIP j ABOARD ROOSEVELT TRAIN ENROUTE TO SALT LAKE CITY Utah over the at tempted bombing of the American Death at Barricade Fails to Halt Comrades One of their number lies dead in front of the barricade hut that fails to halt these volunteer red sol diers on the firing line in San Sebastian northern Spain The cameraman risked Ilis life to obtain this unusual picture In the heart of Spains bloody civil war weekend but the weather bureau said the western half of the state had above normal temperatures Monday morning The highest temperature reported by the weather bureau for the 24 hour period ending at 7 a m Mon day was 89 degrees at Atlantic which also reported the lowest 48 degrees Collide With Iowa Car CHICAGO and Mrs William Melhorn of Chicago suf fered injuries when the car in which they were riding collided with an other driven by John Eden 35 of Monticcllo Iowa Ihe start of this week for a com1 plete physical examination Dr Bittchford said Ickes may have been told of the lung condition by another physician Edzvards Yacht Smashes Into Bridge Little Hun ATHENS Greece King Edward on the deck the yacht Nahlin smashed into a bridge Mon day in the strait off Chalkis on the Aegean island of Euboea The yacht carrying the monarch on a carefree holiday in the Adriatic and Aegean seas apparently was not seriously damaged It proceeded on its way after a brief inspection The king was not perturbed He waved to a cheering crowd on the Chalkis bank after Ihe collision in which a motorboal on Ihe yachl was coast President Roosevelt kept in constant communication with Wash ington Monday as he travelled southwestward toward Salt Lake City to attend the funeral Tuesday of Secretary of War George H Dern His drought conferences will be interrupted until Thursday when he meets with Governor Landon re publican presidential nominee and the governors and senators of six other states at Des Moines Minnesota and Wisconsin gover nors who originally were to have conferred separately with the pres ident were invited Sunday night to the DCS Moines meeting postponed from Sept 1 to permit attendance at the Dern burial Word of Bombing The president received word of Ihe atlemptcd bombing of the de stroyer in a telephone conversation with Secretary Hull Sunday night at Rapid City S Dak soon after he had attended the unveiling high lip on Mount Rushmore in the Black Hills of Gutzon Borglums image of Thomas Jefferson Two hours before the train left Rapid City reporters were sum moned by Marvin H Mclntyre presidential secretary to receive an important announcement Dictating a summary of the bombing report 35 reporters gath ered around him in the dining car Mclntyre said the destroyer had not been hit The Kane fired her anti aircraft guns at the unidentified monoplane but no hits were report ed Off Spanish Coast The bombing he said occurred 35 miles off the Spanish coast At the same press conference Mclntyre announced the resignation of Mrs Ruth Bryan Owen Rohdc American minister to Denmark and crushed and the bridge was slightly damaged Reports reaching here indicated the bridge already had swung open to permit the Nahlins passage in choppy waters when the crash oc curred News of the Nahlins mishap fol lowed reports the yacht had been forced into shelter in Karystos bay on the south end of the island of Euboea by a storm Because of the bad weather King Edward had radioed to Athens sug gesting thai an escort of destroyers be withdrawn Accordingly the de stroyers lurned back lowafd Athens i its acceptance to permit Ihe daughnoon for a droughl conference HIGHWAY DEATH TOLL OP TO 304 Boy 5 Killed and Baby Brother Injured When Struck by Car By THE ASSOCIATED IUESS The last weeks entries in the highway death toll record pushed the total of lives lost so far this year to 304 Anthony Herbck 59 Cedar Rap ids janitor was a weekend accident victim He suffered a fractured skull and broken neck when he rode his bicycle into the side of an auto mobile driven by John Myers of Davenport Near Washington Mr and Mrs Ed Duvall of West Chester Iowa were killed when the automobile in which they were riding smashed into a bridge ahead Frank Wilson of Albert City was killed when the ear in which he was riding collided with another Herbert Trimble 56 was another Cedar Rapids victim A WPAJ worker he died when he was thrown from a truck as it plunged into a ditch Lincoln Marshall 72 Newton farmer was a collision Iatalily Freddie Hart 5 was killed and his brotherJames 21 months was severely injured Sunday afternoon when struck by a car driven by Henry Swan near Numa sever miles west of Centerville The chil dren were walking along the road with their mother and each ran a different direction when they saw the car approaching James in a Centerville hospilal is expected to lecover Anthony Hrbek 59 was killed Sunday afternoon at Cedar Rapids when the bicycle he was riding col lided with an automobile driven by John L Myers of Davenport The accident happened at the crest of a hill where Hrbck and Myers both headed the same direction swerved lo avoid a car approaching from Ihe opposite direction ter of the late William Jennings Bryan campaign as a private citi zen for the reelection of Mr Roosevelt Stops at Sidney Enroute on his sorrowful mission at Salt Lake City the presidential special early Monday passed through Chadron Crawford and Al liance Nebr before stopping at Sidney for the drought tour The train is due in Salt Lake City early Tuesday Following the funer al services and interment at 4 p m the president will leave late in the day for DCS Moines via Julesburg Colo Twelve hours will be spent in Des Moines where the train is due at noon central standard time Thurs day Friday he vill dedicate a bridge across the Mississippi at Hannibal Mo at 10 a m then reboard his train at Barry III arriving at Springfield III early that after Norway May Keep Trotzky Permanently OSLO Norway cabinet decided Monday night to keep Leon Trotzky the Russian exile in isola tion under special guard Without disclosing where Trotz ky and his wife will be interned Ihe government officially announced passage of an orderincouncil es tablishing special rules regulating Trotzkys movements and his inter course with other persons Earlier officials indicated ihey mighl keep Trotzky permanently in Norway despite Moscow protests He may receive visitors only af ter he has received permission in each case from the government of fice of passports the official an nouncement staled He may not use the telephone and his mail and telegrams are to be under supervi sion Following a cabinet meeting steps were taken to find suitable quarters for the Trotzkys now un der guard in their home at Hoene foss Informed sources suggested the government might buy an iso lated house where supervision would be simple and inexpensive William F Whiting Member of Coolidge Cabinet Dies at 72 HOLYOKE Mass Failfield Whiling 72 former sec retary of commerce died at his home here Monday after a long ill ness One of the countrys leading pa per manufacturers Whiting was appointed to succeed Herbert Hoov er when the laltcr resigned as head of Uic commerce department He served in Prsidcnt Calvins Cool idge s cabinet from Aug 21 1928 lo March 1 1929 FORECAST IOWA Mostly cloudy Monday night and Tuesday warmer in east and south portions Monday night MINNESOTA Mostly cloudy Monday night and Tuesday warmer in cast portion Monday night cooler in north portiou Tuesday IN MASON CITY Weather figures for 24 hour per iod ending at S a m Monday Maximum Sunday 8 degrees Minimum in night 5B degrees At 8 A M Monday fil degrees Weather figures for 21 hour per iod ending at 8 a m Sunday Maximum Saturday 74 degrees Minimum in night degrees At 8 ii In Sunday 61 decrees CONFESSED BOY MURDERER CALM 15 Year Olds Confession to Slaying of Crippled Widow Studied CHICAGO Munroe 15 year old choir boy maintained an unruffled calm Monday as olfi cials studied his confession to the hammer slaying of a crippled widow in a robbery that yielded worth of jewelry Assistant States Attorney Rich ard Devine said the red haired pris oner confessed he beat Mrs Agnes Roffeis 155 to death Saturday night at her home The prosecutor quoted Ihe youlh as observingwithout remorse I dont think theyll convict me though Im too young Devine said the boy apparently held the belief he had committed a perfect crime but after four hours of questioning declared tell you She died part ly by accident and I killed her be cause I didnt want her to suffer Went o Apartment Munroe related how he went lo Mrs Roffeis apartment to collect for newspapers he had delivered She brought out a box containing an old watch several rings and a cross and sought his advice about sellingthem She suddenly rose from a sofa and attempting to walk without her cane fell to the floor The prosecutor quolcd him as saying While she lay there the thought entered my mind that if I knocked her out I could get all the jewelry I grabbed a hammer and hit her Iwice on Ihe head The third time I missed The hammer hit the floor and the handle broke Then I grabbed her cane and hit her five or six times with the crooked part I used both hands in swinging it I got a wire and wound some of it around her neck The prisoner was quoted as say inp he went to Ihe home nf an old gold buyer to sell the at 8 by found him abed Shows and TlihiKS NOT TO SUBMIT TOM ATTACKS ON SPAIN COAST Neither Destroyer Kane Nor Spanish Plane Hit in Clash WASHINGTON offi cers scanning reports of the at tempted bombing of the destroyer Kane indicated a belief Monday that American war vessels in Span ish waters would answer with re newed gunfire any further attacks which might endanger them Whether such action would be necessary remained to be seen The American government startled by Sundays attempt to sink the de stroyer off the Spanish coast al ready has made swift and emphatic protest to the Madrid regime and the rebels calling on them to pre vent another such incident Although manifestly hopeful that no new incident of that character will occur navy department at taches said a commanding officers first consideration was the protec tion of his ship and crew and that he had full discretion to proceed in any manner he sues lit to insure that protection Has Full Authority Should the judgment of any of the commanding officers of the five ships now in Spanish waters be that use of the ships guns is necessary in an emergency ho has fullauthor ity to resort to such procedure It was said authoritatively that no hard and fast instructions have been sent along these lines to the vessels now in Spain the depart ment relying wholly upon the dis cretion of the commanding officers to carry out their assignment of evacuating Americans from the rev olutionary area The commanding officer of the Kane was said to have acted on bis own judgment in returning the fire of the unidentified plane which dropped bombs near his ship and officers here generally praised his action as highly creditable Incident Not Serious Speculation was stirred in offi cial and unofficial circles over the possible attitude of he United States government had the Kane been hit and damaged by of the bombs but officials declined to comment publicly There were pri vate exprcssiona or belief that the incident was not as serious as it might have been State department corridors wjiere lighU burned late Sunday night as officials under the personal direc tion of Secretary Hull prepared and dispatched a strong protest to both sides in the Spanish civil war over the attack on the Kane had as sumed their normal quiet Monday Thus far the embassy at Madrid has not reported concerning the protest it was directed to make to the Spanish government nor has the American consul at Seville who was instructed o make similar rep resentations lo the commander of the rebel forces advised the depart ment as to the outcome These re ports were expected lo be forthcom ing momentarily Meanwhile the government contemplated no fur ther immediate moves 300 REBEL PRISONERS EXPOSED TO AIR BOMBS Ciuiyrishl J936 by The Aunciitlcd IrcsO IRUN Spain govern ment defenders of Irun brought 300 rebel prisoners into the bombarded city Monday night and announced they would be exposed at the most dangerous points lo insurgent air bombs The prisoners were brought by truck from Fort Guadalupc after a tlozcn projectiles had burst in the city evacuated except for gov ernment fighters and thoir Two women were blown to bit All old women old men am chil dren of republican families pent across the French frontier The reason he wanted the money government leaders announced bill Devinc said was for shows and things Devine expressed the opinion Munroe could be tried in Ihe crim inal court and that the death pen alty could be imposed It may first be necessary he added to arrange a sanity test His parents Mr and Mrs Roland Munrce Sr disclosed the prisoner had recently been examined by a psychiatrist because he had been acting queerly No report on the case had been returned however Police learned young Munroe had been regarded as reticent by his high school teachers He sang in the junior choir at a church but de voted much of his time to reading lurid crime fiction Investigators said he admitted association with a youthful band ensagcd in petty i thievery families of suspected rightist sym pathies were forced to remain All antirepublican prisoners they added would be exposed to the bombardment when the rebels at tempt to carry out their threat to reduce Irun to ashes Up to Monday night however1 the insurgents had not carried out this threat and the bombs which they dropped were said by the de fenders to have caused no impor tant material damage A combined land sea and air bombardment was believed immi nent however REHEI BOMBS TKAIt TWO TO KITS By the Associated Press Rebel bombs tore two women tr bits in the northern Spanish city of Irun Monday while the United Slates government stunned by tho   

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