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Mason City Globe Gazette: Thursday, May 21, 1936 - Page 1

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - May 21, 1936, Mason City, Iowa                                NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME THE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS HOME EDITION FIVE CENTS A COPT ASSOCIATED PRESS JUBASED W1MB MASON CITY IOWA THURSDAY MAY THIS PAJKEB CONSISTS OT TWO SECTION OKB NO 193 Can Italians Get Money In Quest of Foreign Loans to Exploit Ethiopia By CHARLES P STEWART A S H IN G T ON CPA Com merce depart m e n t officials hear that Pre mier Mussolini already has agents abroad seeking foreign loans to exploit Ethiopia That he will be able to r a i 3 e much money is spoken of as ex tremely doubtful In the United States it is right illegal to make financial advances to na tions which are In default on their obligation to Uncle Sam and Italy is 06ne of them The British and French slapped in the face by the Italian defiance of their objections to fascist activities in east Africa are deemedunlikely to favor a bankers policy calculated to aid the new empire in consolidating its position The Italian government not only has no ready cash of its own but probably has exhausted its domestic as well as its foreign credit while its taxation rate is so high now that it seems impossible it can squeeze out another lira by increasing it Ethiopian Outlaws And anyway it is semiofficially predicted that world capital will not consider the ItaloEthiopian em pire a safe field in which to invest Another complication threatens As was to have been expected al though Haile Selassie is gone Ethi opian outlaws continue to loot here there and everywhere Foreign sojourners lives ana properties are endangered and Italy has assumed the responsibility of protecting them Indications are that Italy will not be in a position to give this protection on into the indefinite future Mussolini may find that he has bitten off more than he can as one Washington diplomat speak ing in the American vernacular ex pressed it Made Wrong Guess H Duce to tell the truth went much farther than old world st ates manship had anticipated What it had hoped for encour aged by military forecasts was that the campaign delayed by guerilla warfare and rainy seasons would string out so long that the Italians would wilt under the financial bur den of it and have to compromise The big powers looked for a cut ting up of Ethiopia among them Or they thought Mussolini would be satisfied with a mere mouthful of the African kingdom leaving the remainder to Haile Selassie Might Have Resisted If they had sensed the danger that he would grab the whole thing unquestionably they would have re sisted him more ly maybe Even yet they do not believe that he counted on so com plete a conquest Pure blind luck they reckon was with him Diplomacy and militarism alike are skeptical that Italy has won anything in the long run worth They think that Ethiopia finally will prove to be a liability But momentarily from the stand point of prestige they agree that it is a huge asset Danger May Spread The United States is not immedi ately concerned It will be however Italy cannot get conveniently to its new dependency except through the Suez canal Britain can close it Technically it is not entitled to do in an emergency who cares for technicalities Today the Brit ish are mobilizing in the eastern Mediterranean Let a war start there and it will not be a war exclusively between the Italians and the British HUNDREDS DEAD IN EARTHQUAKES Extensive Damage Done and Natives Terrorized in Central China SHANGHAI China quakes killed hundreds in central China caused extensive damage and terrorized the superstitious natives reports reaching Shanghai Thurs day said Several hundred were killed and injured Saturday at pingshin Sze chuan province by a severe shock the reports said Sixty per cent of the buildings in Pingshin were lev Similar quakes occurred Wednes day in Chungking Szechuan prov ince and at Lanchow in neighboring Kansu province Death and damage from the later shocks was not re ported in meager and belated ac counts reaching here RAILS AND LABOR IN AGREEMENT DICKINSON GIVES FIRST CAMPAIGN SPEECH IN IOWA Raps Administration as Urging Acceptance of Socialism SHENANDOAH iff Senator Lester J Dickinson Wednesday condemned the national administra tion whose genial leadership and plausible platitudes have urged ac ceptance of socialism regimenta tion and planned economy in dis guished The Iowa Senator delivered what was heralded as one of his major addresses of a campaign for repub lican renomination before a Dickin son day farm audience here He is regarded as well as a dark horse aspirant to the partys pres idential nomination The republican party he said is taking the leadership in a national crisis in order to return the Am erican government to the American Trend Well Known The trend is well known to every farmer who has given thought to the direction in which this gov ernment has been moving in the past three he said The fanners individuality his freedom and his lands would have been swallowed up and controlled by a bureaucracy in Washington had those high in office in the na tions capital been able to achieve their Dickinson vigorous foe of the administration quoted George N Peek first administrator of the fixing socialized farming as the objective of the administra tions agricultural policies Begin to Wonder Today he said people of both political faiths are beginning to wonder they have seen tried and true principles of orderly govern ment threatened by extinction and supplemented by costly experi mental programs to satisfy the whims of bureaucracy The question is Shall we live under a bureaucracy or under a democracy shall we live by experi ence or shall we live by experi ment Visits Experimental Farm Dickinson visited the soil erosion experimental farm near here and the Tarkio river watershed soil erosion projects during the morning In his address he stressed what he said was the importance of such projects for agriculture He outlined his own proposed six point farm plan of which soil ero sion prevention with federal aid and under state supervision is a plank Federal soil erosion control he said had its inception in a study for which he and other congressmen were instrumental in obtaining funds in 1929 ON THE INSIDE CLAUDE BEAVERS Beavers Caught Only 2 Fugitives at Large ON PAGE 2 Draft Lehman Move Pushed by Democrats ON PAGE 2 Conservation Success Is ON PAGE 8 June NoAccident Drive Launched in Mason City ON PAGE 17 Townsend Denies Using Mails for Fraud Former Local Lawyers Son Named Judge CHARLES S DOUGHERTY Attorney Charles S Dougherty ace prosecutor on the staff of three states attorneys at Chicago was appointed judge of the municipal court of that city to fill a vacancy by Gov Henry Horner Thursday at was learned here Mr Dougherty is the son of Mrs Anna W Dougherty of Chicago and the late Patrick J Dougherty who practiced law in Mason City for 30 yearsbefore his death in 1913 is the fee late Daniel Dougherty who founded the town of Dougherty in Cerro Gordo county in 1858 and a nephew of the Rev Edward J Dougherty well known Iowa priest who is now pastor in Waterloo He was formerly rector of the cathedral in Dubuque He is a brother of Sister Mary St Gerald B V of St Raph aels convent Dubuque and of the Rev P Gerald Dougherty O S M Mr Dougherty has prosecuted many of Chicagos most important murder cases He is 44 years old and served 17 months overseas He aas been active in American Legion circles having been first com mander of Norman Cornwall post serving for five years He Vas reared in Dougherty where he has many relatives RAINlRlCTED IN IOWA FRIDAY Clouds to Drift Over West and NorthCentral Part of State DES MOINE3 the weatherman said Thursday will drift over Iowa Friday possibly bringing showers in the west and northcentral portions He expected warmer tempera tures in the east section Thursday night and cooler in the northwest Friday Burlington reported 86 for Wed nesdays high temperature Forest Citys 54 was the low Charles City measured 25 of an inch of rain during the last 24 hours There was a trace at Des Moines FORECAST IOWA Partly cloudy to cloudy possibly local showers in north west portion Thursday night and in west and north central Friday somewhat warmer In east Thurs day night and in extreme east Friday cooler in northwest Fri day MINNESOTA Unsettled thun der showers probable in east and south portions Thursday night and Friday and In northwest Thurs day night somewhat wanner In northeast and cooler In Red Riv er valley Thursday night cooler in west and warmer In northeast Friday IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather figures for 24 hour period ending at 8 oclock Thursday morning Maximum Wednesday Minimum In At 8 A SAYS HE DID NOT KNOWOF APPEAL MADE FOR FUNDS Tells Probers He Made No Effort to Stop Contributions By SCOTT HERSHEY Associated Press Staff Writer WASHINGTON JVAn asser tion immediately denied that the Townsend old age pension organiza tion used the mails to defraud was made Thursday before a house in vestigating committee James R Sullivan committee counsel declared that was raised for a congressional fund by an appeal to Townsend clubs sent through the mails in the form of Did you make any effort to stop these contributions Sullivan asked Dr F E Townsend after reading a Townsendgram appeal for funds Dr Townsend replied We were after Did you do anything to stop this use of the mails to defraud snapped Sullivan Doesnt Concede It I dont concede it was use of the mails to said Dr Town send Sullivan contended the Town sendgrams contained fraudulent as a basis for tfte plea for moneyl Dr Townsend who was on the stand for the third day denied knowledge of the appeal until aft er it was He added he did not believe the mails were used to Sullivan said that prior to the Townsendgram appeal the organ ization raised to defray ex penses of seven men brought to Washington in January 1935 to draft the McGroarty bill embody ing a form of the Townsend plan and work for its passage Used Before Appeal Dr Townsend disclaimed knowl edge of Sullivans assertion that only of the was used before the Townsendgram appeal was made for additional funds The witness explained he had little or nothing to do with the raising of money and his province was the philosophical and economic aspect of tie movement He said Robert E Clements for mer national secretary and cofoun der and others in the business of fice handled the financial end of the program The Townsendgram appeal lor funds carried the name of Clements and Charles H Randall of Los An geles chairman of the Townsend national strategy committee Name Was Forged Sullivan introduced testimony taken by a subcommittee in Califor nia in which Randall said he signed the original appeal for the congres sional fund but denied he signed the Randall Sullivan said testified he had nothing whatsoever to do with the sending of the Townsendgram adding that Randall claimed his name was forged to those Town The in addi tion to an appeal for money re ported several notable victories for the Townsend cause Asked about these victories Dr Townsend said he supposed what is meant was that some congress bmen had been approached and were more cognizant of our Went to Clubs The Townsendgrams were dated March 22 1935 Sullivan brought out that the ap peal went to clubs and with urgings to suggested a quota of 15 cents a member He read a number of letters from various Townsend clubs acknowl edging the request for funds and noting inclosure of contributions Sullivan contended the congres sional fund had a balance of about when the Townsendgram appeal was made How do you know that Dr Townsend asjted We know it and have the rec Sullivan replied Read Into Record Dr Townsend denied the appeal was discussed in the presence of O Otto Moore Denver and other Townsend leaders and that Moore protested the appeal and said he would prosecute those who made it Sullivan read into the record Dr Townsend Quizzed on Old Age Pension Plan Dr Francis E Townsend author of the old age pension plan is pictured ellteJ flo underwent questioning by a house committee investigating the pension plan in Washington r Townsend to Ms onetime partner Robert E Clements in which such statements as You and I by the tall on a downhill putt were read bringing giggles from the packed Inquiry room a TamTge of questions Dr Townsend said that people throughout the country a pretty good opinion of NATIONAL UNION OF IOWA TO MEET Members Lack Agreement With Coughlin on Three Congress Candidates DES MOINES mem bers of the Rev Charles E Cough lins National Union for Social Jus tice will gather here Sunday for their state convention lacking agreement with Father Coughlin on indorsement of three Iowa congres sional candidates The Detroit priest through L M Peet his Iowa supervisor disclosed he favors renomination of Repre centative B M Jacobsenby second district democrats renomination of Representative Otha D Wearin by seventh district democrats and nom ination of A former Iowa representative by third dis trict democrats Based on Records Peet said Father Coughlins pref erence for these three is based on their and in the case of Jacobsen and Wearin on their votes for the FrazierLemke District social justice union con ventions previously indorsed George Koob over Jacobsen Charles E Petty over Wearin and W A Reed over Willford District conventions and Father Coughlin agreed in in dorsing seven other congressional candidates State convention delegates Peet said probably will consider the di vergence in indorsement Sunday Over Expected We expect an Peet declared of more than of the social justice union mem bers in Iowa They will lay plans for supporting favored candidates and hear both those indorsed by district conventions and by Father Cough lin if they wish to United States Senator Elmer Thomas of Oklahoma is scheduled to address the convention at p m Peet said Thomas address will be broadcast by a national ra dio chain from to 3 p m Decrease in Number of lowans on Relief Noted April Shows Drop of1 testimony taken by a sirocommit tee in Los Angeles from Moore Moore testified he left the Town send organization in April 1935 after about six months member ship Representative Collins a subcommittee member objected to the hearingof Moores testimony on the ground it already was a part of the record Chairman Bell overruled the objection and was sustained by the committee Moores testimony generally was critical of the Townsend organiza tion and its method of operation From March Total DES MOINES Iowa emergency relief administration re ported Thursday persons re ceived direct unemployment relief during April a decrease of persons on relief during March In terms of cases which include both families and single persons the decrease was from to Aprils cases is a decrease of from the high point of March 1935 when the IERA grant ed relief to cases More Farm Government work projects cou pled with an increasing number of jobs in private industry and on farms the IERA said is bringing about a marked reduction in the re lief load as the spring advances During April relief costs amount ed to not including money spent on subsistence gardens whichtotaled Thia com pares with the high point of Iowa relief expenditures in January 1935 Polk County High Polk county was high in number of cases during April with Woodbury came next with and Dubuque third with 897 Scott county had 860 cases Linn 734 and Pottawattamie 730 Polk countys cost was highest Woodbury was next with and Dubuque third with Scott county spent Pottawattamie and Linn county Twentynine counties spent less than a thousand dollars Fortyfive counties had less than 100 relief cases Biermanns Bill for Clayton State Park Reported Favorably WASHINGTON tive Biermanns bill to grant Iowa 454 acres of federally owned land in Clayton county for a state public park has been reported favorably by the house agriculture committee The grant would be dependent upon operation of a free park The land is located near McGregor in the upper Mississippi wild life and fish refuge The Iowa democrats bill further provided that would protect life within the park and promote the growth and devel opment of its natural growth ASKS DUEL WITH BEAN BLOWERS Editor Claims Curtis Stole Leadership of Drive for Nightshirt OTTAWA challenge to a duel with bean blowers at 5C yards was issued Thursday to Tom B Curtis of Atlanta by L M Doc Davis Ottawa editor who declared he was the originator of all movements to organize wearers of the oldfashioned nightshirt The other day Curtis told what he called his plans to form the old fashioned nightshirt the managing editor of the Daily Repub licanTimes said Its pure plagiarism Tom is my southern deputy and is taking ad vantage of the distance between us to claim authorship of the plan which I laid down as long as five years Davis dragged out dusty news paper files to show his editorial page columns of half a decade ago in which he heaped calumny upon lame brained pyjama an recited the comfort of the good old nightshirt with generous vents up the Davis articles resulted in forma tion of local No 1 of the nightshirt club It now boasts several hundred members in this community of 15 000 persons Dust Storm Plays Tag With Rain and Wine LAMAR dust Strom played tag with rain and strong wind over broad rtretche of the black blizzard country con tinued early Thursday with viai bility near zero The affected area apparently was limited to sections of southeastern Colorado the Oklahoma Panhandl and extreme western Kansas PROTECT THOSE LOSING JOBS IK CONSOLIDATIONS Senate Group Arrives at Compromise on Levy on Corporations WASHINGTON UP A volun ary agreement between railroad management and labor to vrotect workers dismissed in consolidations tood out in a busy capital day Thursday It was reported by the negotia tors to President Roosevelt who ast March urged auch an agree ment and said if it were not reached and legislation is sought as the only solution I fear harm to the ailroad The agreement provides a scale yf dismissal wages ranging up to ne years salary for employes who lave been in service 15 years or onger If they preferred workers ould take partial salary payments ver a period of months Faces Heavy Program Freed of the possibility of being Called to intervene in this problem congress still faced a heavy pro gram before adjournment Flood control proposals held house and senate floors while the senate finance committee sought to weed out some of a dozen different ax plans and a house committee ressed an investigation of the ownsend pension plan Whipping all but one member nto line the senate finance com mittee reached agreement on a compromise plan for increasingjjor poration taxes but scuttled a pro at the loss of considerable revenue for boosting the normal in come tax rate ter days of delay the commitfee thuBTeached accord on the vital part of the rev enue bill Flat 18 Per Cent The compromise would call for a flat 18 per cent tax on corporation ncome a fiat 7 per cent on income withheld from distribution exemp tion of if income from the 7 er cent tax for corporations mak ng no more than a year and retention of the present capital stock and excess profits taxes Before the Townsend committee an assertion was made and immedi ately denied that the organization o pay a month to everyone jast 60 had used the mails to de raud Other developments President Roosevelt signed the Norris bill authorizing expenditure of over the next 10 years for rural electrification Force House Caucus Twentyseven representatives orced a caucus of house democrats n an effort to get the house udiciary committee to approve anti ynching legislation Secretary Morgenthau said the reasurys midyear financing plans would be announced on June 1 If taxes and next years appro priation cannot be acted upon be fore the June political conventions leaders believe a recess may be tak en with the legislators returning to their labors afterward Congress wondered whether the leaders would seek to press the new Guffey control bill substitute for the one invalidated by the supreme court to passage this session labor Provisions Introduced Wednesday by Senator Guffey it calls for price fixing but omita the wage hour and other labor provisions outlawed bv the high court John L Lewis United Mine Workers president urged that it be passed this session to maintain the equilibrium of the industry pending further study President Roosevelt stayed up late Wednesday night to confer with Senators Norris Wagner DN Schwellenbach D Wheeler Minton Shipstead and LaFollette and Felix Frankfurter Senators said it was just a general chat covering ev erything from the Guffey act to the effect of spots on the Cruiser Vincennes Launched by U S QUINCY U 8 cruiser Vincennes a ton ves sel named after the city of Vin cennes was launched Thurs day at the Fore river plant of th Bethlehem Shipbuilding corpora tion Mrs Roosevelts Condition Reported to Be Excellent HYDE PARK X condition of Mrs Sara Delano Roosevelt 82 years mother of the president who Injured in a tall was excellent Thursday by attending physi cian Dr Scott Lord Smith of poughkeeptie The physician said the injury would have no permanent   

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