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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: October 9, 1933 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - October 9, 1933, Mason City, Iowa                                TWO BIASON CITY GLOBEGAZETTE OCTOBER 9 1933 PIONEER NASHUA TEACHER BURIED Also Held for Brown for Whom Mrs Parish Was Instructor NASHUA Oct Morilla Parish one of the first teachers In Nashua who died Friday after an illness of several weeks was buried yesterday afternoon She was born in Jefferson county Wis Nov 20 1847 and came to Nashua in 1865 She was married to Warren Parish Nov 20 1866 whodied Jan 14 1913 Two sons were born to them Walter Thornton and Wilson who died Feb 23 1915 Mrs Parish came to Nashua when there was no railroad and few stores She often recalled the time when Lin coin was assassinated the news was brought to the town by the stage driver The funeral was Held at the Methodist church the Rev G C Lusted officiating An unusual coincidence is that the death of William A Brown which followed Mrs Parishs within a few hours was the same nature and that she was his first teacher Mr Brown the first whito child born in Freemont township Butler county was born near Plainfield May 25 1857 and lived all his life in this community Ha was married Oct 11 188B at Horton to Miss Mary Hastings who with the fol lowing foster children who were all adopted into the home at the name time survive Mrs Donald Patoude Land O Lakes WIs Earl Nashua Ray New Hampton The luneral will be held this afternoon at the home the Rev A S Wat son Plalnffeld officiating CharlesCityNews WATERLOO MAN HURT IN MISHAP Driver of Auto in Accident Near Floyd Not Found by Officers CHARLES CITY Oct A Anderson of Waterloo who was in jured in a car accident last evening near the Floyd cemetery was taken to Waterloo today by hia wife An derson was thrown out of the car and as found on the paving by passeraby He was brought to the Cedar Valley hospital for treatment Officers were called and Investiga tion made Glenn Vo gt o Waterloo have bean the driverof the auto could not be found Music Festival to Be Held in Charles City Schoolmasters Decide CHARLES Cm Oct was decided at a meeting of the School masters club of Floyd county to have a county music festival in Charles City May 11 1934 C A Fullerton of Cedar Falls met with the group to assist in planning the program In addition to the high school organizations which will par ticipate a chorus made up of fifth and sixth grades of the town schools and the rural school pupils will sing a massed group program The music supervisors met with the principals and superintendents in Nora Springs to work out the plan which was indorsed by Fannie EXPLORING THE HISTORY OF IOWA By JOHN ELY BRIGGS UNIT NO 2 HOW THE INDIANS LIVED This is the sixth venture in the series of thirtysix explora tions Into the history of Iowa One topic will appear in this paper each Monday during the school year 2 To Learn About the Indian Tribes of Iowa As short a time as 260 years ago no white man had seen the land that is now Iowa But the Indiana had been living here thousands of years before that Season after season they had hunted and fished along the streams and on the prairie they had chased the elk and the buffalo War parties had sallied forth from the villages and returned with the scalps of many enemies Squaws and their grandmothers before them longer than anyone could remember had planted seeds in the spring and in the fall had gathered the corn and pumpkins and beans Nobody knows what tribes they were The things that have been found in their mounds and on the sites of their vil lages show that they were of two different stocks Some spoke the deep throaty lan guage of the Sioux while others talked in the lisping manner of the Algonkians Tribes that belonged to bothof these great families were liv ing in Iowa when the white men came Who were the Indians of Iowa that the white men knew They were the ones from whom the United States government got the land to sell to the set tlers These were the tribes hat lived here from the time hat Julien Dubuque began mining lead until after Iowa Became a state During that rialf century no less than seven tribes were at home in the woods andon the prairies of owa and two others were here Eor a few years by order of the government It was in 1837 that some Pot moved from their home near liake Michigan to southwestern Iowa and three years later part of the Winnebago tribe was brought from Wisconsin into a strip of country between the Sioux and the Sauks and Foxes It ex tended 20 miles on both sides of a line from the mouth of the Upper Iowa river to the upper fork of the Des Moines river The Sioux or Dakotas as they called themselves lived in skin tipis on the prairies of northern Iowa Minnesota and Black Ha wit Foweshlek Mahaslca Wan eta farther west There they hunt ed and moved their villages where they pleased Often they made war upon the loways Sauks and Foxes They fought fiercely and died bravely Though very gay in their war paint and feathers they were also quarrelsome and cruel It was a band of Sioux led by the terrible Inkpaduta that killed the settlers at Spirit Lake in 1857 Unlike that wicked sav age Wabasha Waneta and War Eagle were friendly to the white people The greatest of these Sioux chiefs was the able arid powerful Waneta who once ruled all of northern Iowa Alongthe streams that flow intotKe river in southwestern Iowa there were three related Otoes Omahas and Missouris They also were of Siouan stock A hundred years ago the oldest tribesmen remembered an an cient tradition that their an cestors had come from the east The loways had stopped at the Mississippi but the others had gone on to the Mis souri giving their name to that river Later the Otoes moved farther north to live by them selves The Omahas came from the valley of the Ohio Trouble followed them all Grasshoppers ate their crops and their hunters returned empty handed Many died of smallpox and others were killed in battle Only a few were left when the white men came In the valley of the Des Moines lived the loways for whom the state was named Big and strong broadshould ered and deepchested they had enormous appetites It was fortunate that they were ex cellent hunters because they liked to eat meat But they were ugly in looks Their mputha were wide and they wore rings in their noses which were none too clean The men fastened on their heads a crest made of a deer tail and horse hair It was the sign of a war rior This fashion they may have learned from the Sauk and Foxes Though brave in battle many wars reduced their number so that they were often defeated and driven away from their hunting grounds but they never lost The noble Mahaska their best known chief and mightiest warrior made peace with the white men and kept his prom ise never to raise the torria iawk against them The Sauks and the Foxes who lived along the Mississippi river were friends For many years they fought together against the Sioux and the oways No one could stand against their savage attacks What they wanted they took Half of Iowa was theirs when the government bought the land for the settlers Though the Banks and Foxes were both Algonkian Indians and lived as neighbors they were not entirely alike The Sauks listened to good advice they thought twice before they raised the war whoop they usually traded fairly and they kept their word But the Foxes were every man for him self Many of them were so greedy that they were willing to cheat and steal In spite of their bad char acter however they were very religious and so were the Sauks Their idea of creation was much like the Bible story God they called Getci Mun ito who sent his son Wis aka to destroy evil and teacl men how to live He saved his uncles and aunts the Indians from a great flood and hav ingobtained fire tobacco ant other comforts for them he went far to the north where he still lives Some day they say he will return Pashepaho and Appanoose were leaders among the Sauks in Iowa but their fame was dim beside the fearless Black Hawk and proud Keokuk Poweshiek Wapello and Taima were the principal chiefs of the Foxes Since the Sauks and Foxes left Iowa they have lived aparl and their old friendship is al most forgotten A few of the Foxea returned many years ago bought some land near Tarna and there they are stil living much as their grand fathers did v ACTIVITY HINTS 1 How many Indian names can you find on a map of Iowa 2 Make a map of Iowa show ing where the different tribes lived 3 Tell a story relating to the life of an Indian chief in Iowa 4 Eead more about the In dians of Iowa in the February 1928 number of The Palimp sest TWO BARNS NEAR PROTIVIN BURN rigin of Flames Unknown Insurance Covers Loss of Structures PROTIVIN Oct fire de troy ea two large barns at the home f L S Pecinovsky six and one alf miles northwest of here When Ije Protlvln fire department arrived t was Impossible for the firemen to ave the barns How the fire orig nated is unknown Hay and feed also destroyed The loss of the arns Is covered hy insurance The ire occurred Friday night Howell county superintendent of schools Plans were also made for a series of constructive meetings for the discussion educational subjects at intervals during the school year The date of the anBua basketball tournament was set for te last week in February Among the officers who attended Supt D R Roberts Floyd resident Supt Envin Larson klarble Rock vice president Fred arson athletic coach Nora prings Supt W I Sayre Rock ord treasurer FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST SCIENTIST MASON CITY IOWA ANNOUNCES A FREE LECTURE ON CHRISTIAN SCIENCE By John Randall Dunn C S B BOSTON MASSACHUSETTS Member of the Board of Lectureship of the Mother Church the First Church of Christ Scientist ia Boston Massachusetts MONDAY EVENING OCTOBER 9 1933 HIGH SCHOOL AUDITORIUM AT OCLOCK THE PUBLIC IS CORDIALLY INVITED TO ATTEND ongregational Church Plans for Anniversary CHARLES CITY Oct are being made to observe the sev ntyfifth anniversary of the First Congregational church Nov 9 10 and 12 The church was organized jy the Rev J H Windsor father nlaw of Roger Leavitt pioneer banker of Cedar Falls and Water oo The Rev Mr Windsor also or ganized the church at Crcsco which celebrated its anniversary Gus Meros Has New Shoe Repair Shop Its the MODEL SHOE SHOP 106 South Federal north display window of room occupied by ModelUnique cleaners Gus has a fine new repairing equipment Several ma chines light green trimmed and each is modern in every respect For 16 years Gus has rebuilt shoes in Mason City Now he has the finest type of equipment and will repair your shoes the very way using fine quality ma terlals Take your shoes to tho MODEL The job will be expertly done and Gus just starting in business will greatly ap preciate your patronage MODEL SHOE SHOP GUS MEROS Proprietor 106 South Federal Tractor Is Taken to Worlds Fair CHARLES CITY Oct standard model of the HartParr tractor left here this morning for Chicago to be exhibited at the Cen tury of Progress The tractor will be on display at the Firestone ex hibit in a glass case The model A machine was equipped with pneumatic tires and chrome plated iccessories were added that the model might be a credit to the trac tor division or the Oliver Equipment Teeth The lowest I have made on Dental Work In fifteen years Silver Fillings As Low As 50c GOLD RUBBER PLATE Teeth Extracted SlOO Flates repaired In my own laboratory while you wait Jacob EHynds DENTIST Over Palola Royal Corner North of Dime Stor OPEN EVENINGSSDNDAY A ompony The HartParr company as the distinction of making the rst tractor in the world CHARLES CITY BRIEFS CHARLES CITY Oct A Beardmore went to Allison oday to begin the regular term of ourt A hundred boys of the safety chool patrol were guests of Jack of the Gem theater Saturday morning They were also treated vlth candy by Harley Vastine and Harry Schafner At a business meeting before the show in the po ice office in the city hall the boys ilected George Nlckerson president A E Regel and J C Graves have jcen apolntcd general agents in northeastern Iowa for the National Guardian Life Insurance company of Madison Wis and have opened offices in the room formerly occu pied by the late Dr McCray in the Ellis building Robert McGeeney was taken to the Cedar Valley hospital for treat ment of Brights disease following a siege of tonsilitis Mrs Millard Smith is recovering from a sprained ankle received when she fell last week Mr nnd Mrs J F Buckman went to Cedar Rapids to visit their son Verle and family and see their new randson bom Oct 5 Russell McMalns Clyde Dobbs and Kenneth Coacher went to Iowa 3ity Saturday to see the lowaBrad ey football game Mr and Mrs J P Jensen of Corning are guests of their daugh ter Mrs H A Moldenhauer and family Russian Flyer Sets New Airplane Mark NEW YORK Oct 3 on egged Russian flyer who lost th eg duringaerial combat in th Vorld war has taken a place wit rorld aviation record holders Ma Alexander P De Seversky flew a mphlbian of his own design 1777 miles an hour to a record for tha ype craft yesterday at he natlona harlty air pageant at Roosovel ield Judge Desort to Hear Olds Divorce Action CHARLES CITY Oct R F Desort will hear the divorce suit of Russell B Olds in superio court in Chicago this week Olds who asks the custody of three chil dren charges his wife Dorothy J 38 with an offense in Chicago las March 3 The couple has not Hvei together since Mrs Olds hod file suit in Charles City asking that he husband be restrained from tryin the suit In Chicago on the ground that neither resided there Mrs Gardner President CHARLES CITY Oct fficera of the Rebekah Relief so iety were elected as follows Mrs ieroy Gardner president Mrs An on Nies secretary and Mrs Wa er Scott treasurer Mrs Ra Inch and Mrs Mark Young serve uring the social hour which fo owed the business meeting At Mason City THEATERS Although only a few of Holly woods numerous actors are billed under nicknames rather than their real monickers all six of the men in the filmusical Too Much Har mony now at the Cecil theater ave Iven screen credit with their nick names They are Bing Crosby Jack Oakie Skeets Gallagher Harry and Sammy and Lily an Sreen Ned Sparks lohen Judith Allen Tashman also have important roles Barney Fagan famous frco wheeling aoft shoe dancer who re vives his original stage hit num ers in Broadway to Hollywood1 Metros big parade of Broadway anc Hollywood stars currently showing it the Palace estimates that in his ong career before the footlights he has danced 108500 miles Others who appear in this dazzling aggre ation of celebrities Include Alice Irady Jackie Cooper Jimmy Dur ante Frank Morgan Madge Evans Eddie Quillan and Fay Templeton 3 a fc Marlon Davles will bo seen start ing Monday at the Strand theater in Peg O My Heart with Onslow Stevens As the little Irish girl who nherits an ancestral estate in Eng iand and falls in love Miss Davies s considered to have given the finest performance of her entire ca It will make you laugh and cry at the same time See this sweet simple tale of love and romance The Columbia picture Thats My Boy an adaptation by Norman Krasna of the novel of the same name by Francis Wallace author of Huddle and Touchdown is he feature this week at the Iowa Jieater Roy William Neill direct ed the production which features Richard Cromwell Dorothy Jordan and Mae Marsh Though not tho f Irs t of its type Boy will leave a far more lasting im press ion than any of the previou football pictures Here is a trulj believable story produced with th advantage of the knowledge ot tin weaknesses of other grid films Such weaknesses have been successfully avoided in Thats My Boy Its a Shame to Tako tho Money thats what 25 screen kiddief thought while they were being pai for riding the ferris wheel and merry go round in scenes for One Sunday Afternoon Gary Coopers latest starring picture coming t the Cecil three days starting Wed nesday It is claimed that this pic ture will prevent 5000 divorces Duke Ellington and his band ar also on the program in A Bundle o Blues t t Kicardo Cortez has finally shake off the bane of every thespiana ex danger of bein typed For years regarded in Hollywood as the Latin lover typi he was groomed to fill tho shots o Rudolph Valentino But during th last year he has demonstrated hi versatility by convincingly playln the part of a doctor In Symphon of Six Million a tabloid columnis in Is My Face Red and a do tective in Thirteen Women An now In the Big Executive comln to the Palace Wednesday he po trays the big businessman as ex emplliled by Wall street The cas also includes Richard Bennet Elizabeth Young and Sharon Lynn o c Robert Montgomery nnd Sally ilers come to the Strand theater yand Thursday In Made Broadway a drama of New ork life from Battery park to Har m Montgomery is said to have lother highspeed comedy role as wiseguy and debonair gambler ho hoodwinks society and reaps a arvest on Broadway A rlpsnortln railroad romance ith more than its share of thun ering thrills wild rides on run way trains plus a delightful rex mance is Dangerous Crossroads he Columbia melodrama which pens at the Iowa theater Wednes ay Chic Sale Jackie Searle and lane Sinclair appear in the prin pal roles of the production direct d by Lambert Hillyer It is full of ction and from beginning to end Detains laugh after laugh largely ecause of the homely and likeable haracterization of an old engineer resented by the ever popular Chic ale W1U Rogers and Louise Dresser vill be reunited again in the new roduction starring the comedian hiloaopher Doctor Bull although his time Miss Dresser will not he is wife Vera Allen recent impor ation from Broadway has been ast for tho leading feminine role Doctor Bull is the new title of The Last Adam recent bookof thc month club selection and curren est seller The film with Marian Andy Devine Rochclle Hud on and Ralph Morgan opens a four lay engagement at the Cecil theater Saturday Tho spectacular carryingson o a wild madcap family members o he idle rich who suddenly becom the nouveaupoor are told in a gay light hearted manner in Thre Cornered Moon starring Claudett Colbert Richard Arlen and Marj Poland coming to the Palace nex Saturday 40 8 American Legion TO END CONTEST At eight oclock tonight Monday nite the con testants will come on the floor to remain until one couple is declared the winner Walkathon Marathon No No Rest Until the Contest Ends Be Out for the Finish ELAPSED TIME 762 HOURS 6 COUPLES REMAIN ADMISSION IOWA Now and Tues Mat loo Eve 30o Child lOc Tht cheers of the mob deafened this grid to the heartoil of tfie two women who loved him I California l Football Ttainl EXCELLENT VARIETY OF SHORT SUBJECTS Rites Held in Church at Duncan for Stupka Who Died in Wisconsin GARNER Oct serv ices for Martin Stupka Sr 82 were held Saturday morning at St Wenscelaus Catholic church in Duncan with the Rev Francis Ko pecky in charge Mr Stupka died at the home of his son Anton at Owen Wis Wednesday He was preceded in death by his wife 6 years ago Surviving are seven sons Martin of Garner Louis of Nora Springs James of Bradford Joseph of Col fax Frank of Stay ton Ore Albert of Badget and Anton of Owen Wis and three daughters Mrs Lena Stanek of Cowrie Mrs Rosie Marz of Eagle Grove and Mrs Mary Young ot Gilbertson Ore Thirtyseven grandchildren survive Mr Stupka came from Bohemia 47 years ago and settled at Fort Dodge where he lived for 20 years when he came to a farm northwest of Garner He made his home with his children since the death of his wife Electric Alarm Installed DUMONT Oct electric firm alarm for the town of Dumont was installed by Roy Bwlng The siren will blow each noon and for the regular monthly meeting of the fire company the first Thursday of each month The Surprise Hit of the Year LAUGHS THRILLS AND HEART THROBS 15c Mat Eve STARTS WEDNESDAY Robert Montgomery MADE on BROADWAY GALA NIGHTS GLORIOUS DAYS THE SAGA OF THE GAY WHITE WAY Its a dozen rolled Into one BROADWAY to HOLLYWOOD ALICE BKADV JACKIE COOPER JI3IMY DURANTE FRANK MORGAN MADGE EVANS EDDIE QUILLAN RUSSELL HARDIE nnd 300 Dancing Beauties CARTOON PARAMOUNT PICTORIAL LATEST NEWS NOW PLAYING GECIIJ TODAY ITJS1C IN THE AIR DANCING FEET GIRLS STARS SONGS BING CROSBY JACK OAKJE SKEETS GALLAGHER Judith Allen Hurry Grtm lilvan Tathman Hid Sparlu Starts Wednesday GARY COOPER in ONE SUNDAY AFTERNOON FAY WRAY NEIL HAMILTON ROSCO KARNS STARTS SATURDAY WILL ROGERS DOCTOR BULL COME OVER ANY TIME YOULL ALWAYS FIND A GOOD SHOW AT THE CECIL   

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