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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - May 22, 1933, Mason City, Iowa                                I H iiLOri L ri H I 3 W U A 3 0 C I OF I 0 rt A OCS UOTNES i North Iowas DAILY PAPER for the Home If VOL xxxix FIVE CENTS A COPY ASSOCIATED PRESS LEASED WIRE SERVICE THE NEWSFAPEU THAT A1AKES ALL NORTH 1OWANS NEIGHBORS HOME EDITION MASON CITY IOWA MONDAY MAY 22 1933 THIS PAPER CONSISTS OF TWO SECTIONS SECTION ONE NO 196 Rumors Stir Washington Soviet Recognition Subject Is Back to Fore By HERBERT PIAJMMER WASHINGTON May 22 grim stately old mansion on Six teenth street in the capital almost within sight of thewhite house is being regarded with more than casual interest since President Roosevelt d i s patched his peace message to the nations of the world Its the old Hussion embas sy now for years boarded up and without a sign of life except the r presence of a caretaker who lives in a little house in the rear And the reason for this interest is that President Roosevelt included Russia among the nations that re ceived his plea for disarmament peace and good will Quick in Denial The white house was quick in its denial that the fact one of the mes sages was addressed to Russia had any significance Russia was sim ply on the list of those nations par ticipating in the disaramament con feernce it was explained Nevertheless the impression was in some quarters that it did have significance that in effect it was technical1 recognition of the So viets by this country The presidents message was in terpreted as the most important gesture toward world peace since the KeiloggBriand pact It was hailed in some quarters as the most important document since President Wilson promulgated his celebrated 14 points at the conclusion of the World war Clash Threatened In 1929 when the KeiloggBriand pact was invoked by this country to prevent a threatened clash in the was de v viin 77 t instance coniniuhica tloii was direct between President Roosevelt and President Kalinin of the allunion central executive com mittee The question then arises in the minds of political observers here as to whether the fact that the com munication was direct implies a technical recognition of Russia or 3s it the first step looking toward formal recognition by the Roosevelt administration The fact that Senator Joseph T Robinson democratic leader of the senate after thinking the thing over said It appears to me it may have that effect only increased the speculation Happened Before However it was pointed out that this is ont the first instance that Washington and Moscow have com municated under the soviet regime President Wilson sent a message to Jacob Sverdloff Kalinins prede cessor in 1918 concerning the nego tiations which Soviet Russia was making at BrestLitovsk for sep arate peace with Germany In 1921 and 1923 cables were sent Presidents Harding and Coolidge by the soviet foreign minister concern ing recognition The latter however were replied to by public state ments delivered to soviet represen tatives in Estonia Moon and Cowin to Direct Repeal Drive DES MOINES May 22 Iowa repeal for prosperity com mittee named E G Moon democrat of Ottumwa and R N Cowin oi Waterloo republican cochairmen at an organization meeting AUNT HET By Robert Quillen Of course shes a good Christian an she believed Tom went right to Heaven but you cant act that cheer fuJ at a funeral without makin folks suspicious THREE FOUND SLAIN AT AUSTIN COUNCIL ASKED TO PUT HOPKINS BACK IN OFFICE Reports by Engineering Firms on Appraisals Made at Meeting E H Crofoot city water super intendent who for several weeks has been acting manager was ap pointed permanent city manager by tha city council Monday morning The vote was tliree to two Mayor J T Laird David Olson and J J Burns balloting in favor of the ap pointment and H M Knudson and W J Pagenhart in opposition Voting on the motion to appoint Mr Crofoot came at the conclusion of one of the most spirited argu ments that has come up in the city council this spring taking neaily half the time of the three hour ses sion Further reports on the pro posed utility appraisals were heard but consideration of them was post poned to a future meeting Present Petition Precipitated into the midst of the discussion of the motion by Mr Olson and second by Mr Burns to make Mr Crofoot the permanent manager was a petition containing 3112 names asking the council to appoint P F Hopkins who held the position of city manager for six years up to April 1 This was pre sented by John Senneff while Mrs iWV Slnnptt and Mrs J R Hoi man joined him in support of the proposal the latter speaking chiefly oh the need of an actual city man ager under this form of govern ment As soon as the motion for Mr Crofoots appointment was present ed Mr Knudson opened the argu ment that all councilmen should have a right to consider all the ap plications for the job before action was taken Wanted Consideration Mr Mayor he said you have In your possession a number of ap plications for city manager from various people As far as I know the council has given no consideration to these Might it not be wise to consider these other applications be fore we select a city manager You have said on a number of occasions you want to select the best man That thought I believe represents the majority on this council I want it to be known this is no slight on the present manager but I feel that in fairness to the citizens of Mason City and all members of the council the other applications should be considered in an open council meet ing Apparently taking the statements of Mr Knudson as a plea for the return of Mr Hopkins Councilman Burns argued that there was no point to considering a man who had resigned and who had not put in fin application for the job I know there is a petition out for Mr Hopkins but I dont think we should consider the petition of a lot of soreheads he said Praises When I spoke of applicants for the council I was not referring to any one person Mr Knudson re plied The fact is not one of many applications that have been made liave come before the council nnd as a member of the council and as a citizen I have the right to consider the others Mr Olson then spoke in favor of bis motion In Mr Crofoot we have a man who is absolutely capable for the Ll Crofoot Chosen Permanent City Manager AGED FM PAIR THOUGHT KILLED Turn to U Column Z JAPAN CAVALRY HEARS PEIPING 30 American Missionaries at Tungchow in Path of Advance PEIPING May 22 reaching the United States lega tion stated today that Japanese cav ilry patrols had penetrated to with n five miles of Tungchow which Is 13 miles east of here Thirty American missionaries at Tungchow were remaining at their posts anticipating a peaceful turn over of the town today PERMANENT MANAGER E H CROFOOT 4 Big Powers of Europe to Sign Mussolini Pact Responsible for Peace or War Italian Official Declares ROME May 22 four big powers of western Europe are res ponsible for peace or war in Eu rope and In the world undersec retary of foreign affairs Fulvio Su vich told the chamber of deputies today in a discussion of Premier MuBsolinlsfcmr power peace pact That pact now is befqre England Germany Prance and Italy for formal signature Informal agreement to a revised version of the four power pact first proposed by the premier in March was given yesterday by the four nations Its main points 1 Collaboration among the four powers to preserve peace for 10 years without intention to impose any solution on any smaller nations Treaty Revision Possible 2 The statement that post war treaties revision is a possibility but only under article 16 of the cove nant of the league of nations 3 The mention of disarmament only as a desirable necessity with out specific recommendations 4 An agreement to abide by article 10 of the covenant protect ing territorial integrity and inde pendence of league members against external aggression The preamble stated the pact was rrnsed on the league covenant the BriandKellogg pact and the four power no force agreement of last December which guaranteed Ger man arms equality after a serious misunderstanding in the disarma ment conference The league cove nant was not specifically mentioned in the form of the original past Hailed ns Hnppy Augury The agreement hailed as a happy augury for the disarmament confer ence and the world economic con ference may be initialed today at Geneva Formal signing was ex pected to take place here later with the honor of formally notify ing the world of the understanding reserved for n Duce himself Expectations were this formal no tification might follow the meeting of the fascist grand council tonight Inclusion in the agreement of the MacDonald disarmament plan as suggested in a British memorandum on the pact during the two months of its negotiation was not made This was considered in view of the move by the big pow U S WILLING TO CONSULTEUROPE Davis Statement Seen as Offer to Abandon Isolation Policy GENEVA Switzerland May 22 Roosevelts peace message was translated into apro gram of action at the disarmament conference today when the United States virtually offered to abandon its traditional policy of isolation Norman H Davis American am bassadoratlarge told the nations of the world that his government would consult with them when peace is menaced If the United States agrees with the other coun tries concerning the identity of an aggressor nation he promised that Washington will refrain from any action of a nature to hinder collec tive efforts to restore peace Leave Traditional Policy This doctrine considered by league of nations circles as an abandonment of Americas tradi tional policy of isolation was an nounced by Mr Davis to the dis armament conference in an eagerly awaited speech this afternoon The doctrine was taken to mean that when the nations take punitive measures against an aggressor the United States if it agrees to the identity of the aggressor will not therightspfneutrality of the ileaguocifiatibas interpreted the DaVig statement to mean that the United States would respect a blockade by league pow ers against a nation responsible for an outbreak of war Mr Davis also announced that the United States advocates a sys tem of control and supervision of armaments and said that American readiness to participate in meas ures for this control would be ef fective automatic and permanent Oppose Bruslc Revision Inferentially opposing a brush revision of treaties the American ambassadoratlarge urged the maintenance of the territorial status quo He revealed that his country de fines an aggressor as one whose armed forces are found upon for eign territory in violation of treat ies He also announced that the United States is opposed to the re armament of any nation and de clared in favor of the abolition of offensive arms He reiterated American accept ance of Premier Ramsay MacDon Tllm ID Fngc 2 Cnlumn 3 WEVE FOUND IT AT LAST I FOLKS pVj LODK TOATO JUST AROUND THE CORWERl Turn to Pnjre 2 Column 3 Former Editor and lowan Convicted of Constables Slaying EUGENE Ore May 22 Llewellyn A Banks former editor was convicted yesterday by a circuit court jury of second degree mur der for the death March 16 of George Prescott Mcdford consta ble Edith Banks jointly tried with rier husband was acquitted Banks 62 made and lost mil lions in fruit growing and packing in Iowa and California turned news paperman and was defeated for a seat in the U S senate He shot and killed the constable who sought to arrest him on a bur Iglary charge witnesses said Screams of Boy Thwart Kidnaping of His Sister DENVER May 22 he saw a woman clad only in irpflms a ui1 screams of a brother thwarted the ODel by a woman described by the children as nearly nude and a man entirely unclad Continuing their investigation of be abduction attempted early Sunday morning while the larents of the children were assert idly away at a party officers said hey believed the woman was men tally unbalanced or the leader of nudist cult Elwood U told police he was awakened by someone tearing a screen from a Win321 He arose and went into a hallway where he bloomers and with black hair in dis order hanging about her shoulders creeping toward his sister room Too frightened to cry aloud he said he watched until the woman with the child clasped to her breast left by a rear door He screamed As he ran to the door he report ed he saw the woman and a nude man flee down an alley leaving the girl on the ground Police summon ed by neighbors aroused by the youths cries found no trace of the pair but reported finding prints of bare feet in the yard The girl has a bruise on her neck where some one apparently had clutched her CHILD RECEIVES SKULL FRACTURE Portland Sisters Injured as WeekEnd Accidents Take Toll in Iowa Loretta ICrapp 11 injured when the automobile in which she was riding was crashed between a Mil waukee passenger train and a string of sidetracked boxcars nnar Portland Sunday morning received a fractured skull an examination by physicians revealed Monday morning Physicians at Park hos pital where she was taken said her condition was fair Monday after noon Miss Cecelia Krapp 21 a sister injured at the same time was able to leave Park hospital Sunday night Injured when the car in which they were riding was crushed be tween a Milwaukee passenger train and a string of sidetracked boxcars near IV nd Sunday forenoon Loretta i ja at Park hospi tal wher condition was report ed satisfy ry Monday morning and her sister Cecelia Krapp 21 was able to leave the hospital Sun day night Loretta Is suffering from cerebral concussions and possibly other Injuries The girls parents Mr and Mrs N S Krapp who live on route 3 southeast of Portland jumped from the automobile ard escaped serious Injury although Mr Krapp ivas knocked down by the car as it was hurled down the track following the crash Automobile Demolished The automobile was demolished and pieces were strewn along the tracks where they were torn from the machine as it was dragged be tween the cars The side and top were torn off wheels crushed and the motor torn loose Ambulances and physicians were promptly summoned by Milwaukee officials but the injured were taken Community Day Will Be Wednesday Goods Are Offered at Lowest Prices in 50 Years Elaborate preparations by mer chants the march of events under the stimulus of the new deal nnd the certainty of rising prices In the future are expected to make the Mason City community day annual spring sales event the outstanding occasion of Us kind here for years according to those in charge Community day is a citywide merchandising event for all North Iowa in which merchandise pur chased at the lowest prices in 50 years will be offered at sales prices in the face of a rising market Prices Marked Down It Is generally recognized that when merchants come to replenish the stocks that will be sold out at this event higher prices will be paid In fact a number of mer chants have stated the community day price level Is almost certain not be duplicated in Mason City for years to come Eager however to make this community day an occasion that will definitely mark the turning point toward prosperity merchants are exerting every effort to whet the appetites of the buying public by tempting offers They have sharpened their lead pencils and marked down price levels that al ready were down to depths unbe lievable a few years ago in order to make their bargain festival a his tory making event Should Buy Now The sale will give North Iowa residents an opportunity to buy for present needs They are also ad vised to anticipate their needs for the next few months and make FARMERS MAKE STORM REPAIRS Swaledale Reports Damage of Was Caused by Windstorm SWALEDALE May ors in this vicinity who suffered losses from tornadoes were today cleaning up the debris and making preparations for rebuilding struc tures which were destroyed Only minor damage was reported in homes but several barns were blown over or badly damaged by the storm late Friday A survey made showed damage would reach a total of 525000 Lewis Kruggle who lives five miles north of Swaledale aaid he saw four funnels at one time which were working down from the clouds They were a few miles away at that time however In Swaledale trees were blown down and minor damage reported A barn on the Jake Jontz farm was destroyed and two head of horses killed and six Injured A garage was taken off its foundation At the Carl Derry farm 160 trees were pulled out by the roots but none of the buildings damaged At the Jules Nlcholet farm a barn was demolished and the gran ary with several hundred bnshcla of corn destroyed Small buildings at the John Tracy farm were blown down and damage was reported at the Sherman Swanson farm All buildings but the houses were demolished at the Orie Infclt and Mike Dcvvey farms A barn was des troyed at the Phillip J Pitzenberger farm House IH Damaged THORNTON May storm Friday evening was especially severe on the Jules Nlcolct farm northwest of Thornton The roof of Ihe barn and brooder house was car ried off Boards fell Into the Nicolet house damaging It Debris was scattered everywhere BYTHEIRSON38 van Clark Described as Queer Believed Suicide Victim AUSTIN Minn May larently slain by their own son the todies of Mr and Mrs Marvin each about 70 were found oday in their bed ami the body of son Ivan Clark 3S was foiind a road nearby It was believed he latter committed suicide after hootinghis parents Acting Coroner B C Rebman ihysician to the family 20 years aid Ivan was a quiet and peculiar icrson who sometimes showed a violent temper Dr Rebman said he believed Ivan lad slain his parents and then him elf He thought the three died arly today Autopsy Is Performed The fact that two bullet wounds vere found in the body of the son me in his heart and the other In iis head was investigated this aft ernoon by officials It was said here was a remote possibility bat a fourth person was involved An autopsy was being performed determine whether or not the wound In the sons heart would have been instantly fatal or if he could have shot himself In the head after a bullet had pierced his body Preliminary examination physi cians seemed to think indicated that he would have been able to shoot himself In the head alter wounding himself with a tnille near his heart Farm Well Mr and Mrs Marvin Clark re sided on n farm eight miles eas and two miles south of Austin or about three miles northeast of the Rose Creek community They had lived there for many years and owned 80 acres of what was con sidered amongthe best land in the county Their farm was well im proved The double slayingand suicide theory was substantiated officials loinled out by the fact that no noney and no valuables in the muse had been touched Evidence also indicated that the elderly couple made no struggle aiul died nstuntly their bed clothes being latural but slightly disturbed Nc igns of a struggle were found in he house Mother Shot S Times Mrs Clark was shot twice in the brain and once in the heart Clark vas shot once In the brain The hree had been living alone Dr Rebman said the son lind vidcntly nursed a grudge against Turn In rage 2 Column B mil Oberhoffer of Symphony Orchestra Fame Dies on Coast SAN DIEGO May 22 Emil Oberhoffer 68 one of Ameri as foremost musicians who organ zed and conducted the Minneapolis Symphony orchestra for 19 ears lied today at a hotel here He had ecn ill with cancer for several months IOWA WEATHER Scattered filiowern In northeast nnd cast central portions Monday night showers Tuesday followed hy cooler in extreme west portion LOCAL STATISTICS GlobeGazette weather figures for 21 hour period ending at 8 oclock Monday morning Mjixlmum Sunday 715 Minimum In Nlffht At 8 A M Monday 01 Rainfall 10 of an Inch Figures for 24 hour period end ng at 8 oclock Sunday morning Muxlnmm Saturday 74 Minimum In Night f3 Rain on 15 of the first 22 days of the weather story Ma on City will have to tell about this month The longest rainless period three days and it occurred near he beginning of the month Only nee since that time has there been wo consecutive days without pre Ipltation Sundays addition to the Hay precipitation came in the afternoon cimcneo ncr Tnrn rage 2 3 Tum scattered everywhere afternoon MASON CITY ANNUAL SPRING COMMUNITY DAY WEDNESDAY MAY 24   

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